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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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NINETEEN HUNDRED SIXTY FIVE 



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BOSTON COLLEGE • CHESTNUT HILL • MASSACHUSETTS 



URRI 



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Since it was first published in 
1913, the Sub Turri has chron- 
icled the ever shifting patterns 
of hfe at Boston College. Imagi- 
native presidents and distin- 
guished professors have been 
recognized on its pages; students, 
some determined, others indiffer- 
ent, have become the bulk of its 
volumes. 

But the tolling of bells is still 
to be heard beneath the tower. 
Time announces flux, yet people 
remain; and it is these people of 
Boston College — the individuals 
who in nineteen hundred sixty- 
live combined to form this uni- 
versity — whom the fifty-third 
edition of the Sub Turri recog- 
nizes as outstanding. 



Underclass 128 



James G. Hartnett, Editor-in-Chief 
Eugene J. Donahue, Business Manager 

Color photography by the Editor. 



All rights reserved. Reproduction or use 
of the whole or any part of this volume 
without written permission is strictly 
prohibited. ,™. 



Copyright © MCMLXV Suh Turri 




Academics 17 



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Activities 




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Sports 



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Graduates 28S 



Senior cheerleader Peggy Bianchi intently follows the closing minutes 
of play at the Air Force game. Moments later the victorious Eagles 
wrapped-up a 13-7 win over the Academy. 





Eagles down hut far from out. 




An argument at West Point 
did not change the score. 




The Lewis Memorial Drill Team in a salute to John F. Kennedy. 



Our people and our milieu are in ferment. The 
peaceful self-assurance of the past has fled today 
and left uncertain tomorrows in its wake. Old tra- 
ditions lie decayed and impotent and need to he 
erected anew upon the rough-hewn pillars of 
principle. 

In times such as these, when man is pressed by 
hate and violence, great men emerge with lasting 
words that probe our lives for reason, love, and 
brotherhood. A quarter of a century ago the fearless 
voice of Winston Churchill buttressed such an age. 
This is what he said: 



"When great causes are on the move in the 
world . . . we learn that we are spirits, not animals, 
and that something is going on in space and time, 
and beyond space and time, which, whether we like 
it or not, spells duty." 



We can no longer afford to live in 
suspended animation. Whether we like 
it or not it is our duty to commit our- 
selves, to join the ranks of a march- 
ing generation. For us, indifference is 
impossible. 

". . . if the only form of tradition, of 
handing down, consisted in following 
the ways of the immediate generation 
before us in a blind or timid adherence 
to its successes, tradition should posi- 
tively be discouraged. We have seen 
many such simple currents soon lost in 
the sand; and novelty is better than repe- 
tition. Tradition is a matter of much 
wider significance. It cannot he inher- 
ited, and if you want it you must obtain 
it by great labour." 

"Tradition and Individual Talent" 
T. S. Eliot 




]ohn Fiore winds it up with the thirty-five pound weight. 



The Eagles' first National Invitational Tournament — first All-American. 





Don Moran takes a hand-off from quarterback Ed Foley. 





A Ski Team member runs the gates. 



Larry Marzetti on the move at the West Point game. 




"I refuse to accept the idea that man is mere 
flotsam and jetsam in the river of life which sur- 
rounds him . . . I have the audacity to helieve that 
people everywhere can have three meals a day for 
their bodies, education and culture for their minds, 
and dignity, equality and freedom for their spirits. 
I believe that what self-centered men have torn down, 
men other-centered can build up. I still believe that 
one day mankind will bow before the altars of God 
and be crowned triumphant over war and over blood- 
shed, and nonviolent redemptive goodwill will pro- 
claim the rule of the land." 

Dr. Martin Luther King 
Nobel Prize Speech 
December 10, 1964 



A moment's meditation before a final exam. 



Student artist Irene Manzi in a creative mood. 





The Underclass element at Boston College is well represented by a member 
of its sophomore class. Miss Patricia Podd. Youth and loveliness make the 
trials of any day seem lighter to the male students. 



The Skating Club of Boston's Ice Chips presented this year at 
McHugh Forum. 




". . . Christ called upon the young -people 
of his day to he non-conformists. A Christian 
is a constant rebuke to the standards of the 
world. The early disciples turned their world 
upside down, because they were willing to he 
non-conformists. 

They did not conform their faith to match 
the world, but they changed the world to 
match their faith. They had the truth and 
they refused to water it down. They dared 
buck the tide of public opinion and be differ- 
ent. They dared to believe what other men 
doubted. They were willing to risk their lives 
for what they believed . . . and in due time, 
they turned the philosophical, the social, the 
political and the religious worlds of their day 
upside down." 

Rev. Dr. Billy Graham 
Boston Crusade 
October 8, 1964 



Rev. Dr. Billy Graham is received by His Eminence, Richard Cardinal 
dishing, at his Brighton residence. 




10 



■^''^t''. 



The cast of the "Fantasticks" in a rehearsal situation. 





Franz Reynders, noted pantomimist, 
performs for the Humanities Series. 




A scene from the sophomore class' winning production in the Education Skits. 



11 




In keeping ivith the recent tradition and current theme of this edition, the 
editors of the Suh Turri have chosen Miss Judith Anderson as their queen 
for the nineteen hundred sixty-five issue. 



12 




Homecoming Queen Miss Elizabeth Michalski. 



"In the time of your life, live — so that 
in that good time there shall he no ugliness 
or death for yourself or for any life your life 
touches . . . Be the inferior of no man, nor of 
any man he the superior. Remember that every 
man is a variation of yourself. No man's guilt 
is not yours, nor is any man's innocence a 
thing apart. Despise evil and ungodliness, hut 
not men of ungodliness or evil. These, under- 
stand . . . In the time of your life, live — so 
that in that wondrous time you shall not add 
to the misery and sorroiv of the world, hut 
shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery 
of it." 

Prologue, The Time of Your Life 
William Saroyan 




Queen of the Junior Prom, Miss Marcia Lee. 



13 




The Madison Square Garden marquee. B. C. and the N.I.T. winners. 



14 




Between scenes with the stars of 

the Dramatic Society's "Taming 
of the Shrew." 



The incomparahle Fats Domi 



The Eagles' Baud performs at the Forum. 





Lionel Hampton at the Junior Prom. 




"We, the peoples of the United- 
Nations, determined to save succeeding 
generations from the scourge of war, 
which twice in our lifetime has brought 
untold sorrow to mankind, and to re- 
affirm faith in fundamental human 
rights, in the dignity and worth of the 
human person, in the equal right of 
men and women and of nations large 
and small . . . and to promote social 
progress and better standards of life 
in larger freedom, and for these ends to 
practice tolerance and live together in 
peace with one another as good neigh- 
bors . . . have resolved to combine our 
efforts to accomplish these aims." 

Charter of the United Nations 



15 



Seven years ago, in the fall of 1958, the Very Reverend Michael 
P. Walsh, S.]., became the twenty-second President of Boston College. 
Today, as has no other individual, this congenial Irishman from South 
Boston has converted the cam-pus Gothic personality into what prom- 
ises to he the most modern Catholic university in the country. 

In his determination to prove that a Catholic university can he a 
fertile ground for scholarship and Catholic intellectualism, Father 
Walsh planted the seeds of the future during his very first months 
in office. Among his inaugural projects was the initiation of a nation- 
wide student recruiting program to accommodate the new influx of 
talented students, and the facidty was increased hy more than half. An 
ambitious ten year, seventy million dollar building program was launched 
by him early in I960. That was five years ago. Now three new dorm- 
itories, the Carney Facidty Center, and McElroy Commons stand 
completed. Construction on the new science building is already well 
advanced, and a women's dormitory, a University library, and a Fine 
Arts Center are scheduled to follow. 

But ivho, we may well ask, is this priest, this businessman who 
has boldly set his sights on a truly unique conception of Catholic edu- 
cation? He is a soft spoken Jesuit for all of his dynamic accomplish- 
ments, and his warm personality and ready wit quickly dispel the awe 
which his office tends to inspire. But there is no mistaking that Father 
Walsh is a pragmatic architect of the future and his sound business 
policies will carry Boston College to nexv heights. 



16 





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Rev. George L. Drury, S.J. 
Executive Assistant to the President 






LlilifLrlJ 



UNIVERSITY 
ADMINISTRATION 



Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 
Secretary of the University 




Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 
Academic Vice President 




Rev. Thomas Fleming, S.J. 

Financial Vice President and Treasurer 



,jiW^ 








Rev. Edmond D. Walsh, S.J. 
Director of Admissions 




20 



Rev. John F. Fitzgerald, S.J. 
Registrar of the University 




Rev. John E. Murphy, S.J. 
Business Manager 



Rev. Brendan C. Connolly, S.J. 
Director of Libraries 





Henry J. McMahon 
Assistant Dean 



Rev. John R. Willis, S.J. 
Acting Dean 







\ f "P^T^ 




nil nil 



Weston M. Jenks 
Director of Guidance 



COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 





Eileen M. Tosney 
Registrar 



Rev. John A. Hinchey, S.J. 
Dean of Men 



Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J. 'f^-< 

Student Counselor l||» 





Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, SJ. 
Dean 




COLLEGE OF 

BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 



Christopher J. Flynn, Jr. 
Assistant Dean 




24 





Rev. Gregory R. Roy, S.J. 
Spiritual Counselor 



Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 
Dean of Men 



Rev. Alfred J. Jolson, S.J. 
Associate Dean 





Rev. George F. Lawlor, S.J. 
Director of Guidance 




Julie A. Bain 
Registrar 



25 






Rev. Robert F. Hoey, SJ. 
Assistant Dean 



Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 
Dean 




26 




SCHOOL 

OF EDUCATION 





Rev. Francis X. Weiser, S.J. 
Spiritual Counselor 



Raj'mond J. Martin 
Director of Student Teaching 



Elizabeth A. Strain 
Registrar 



Mary T. Kinnane 
Dean of Women 





27 




Rita P. Kelleher, R.N., M.Ed. 
Dean 



Pauline R. Sampson, R.N., M.Ed. 
Administrative Assistant to the Dean 



28 




Catherine M. Doyle, A.B. 
Registrar 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Rev. James F. Geary, S.J. 
Student Counselor 




29 




Rev. Charles M. Crowley, S.J. 
Dean 



EVENING SCHOOL 



Katharine M. Hastings, A.M. 
Registrar 




30 




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DEPARTMtNTS^%i>^ 



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James O. Dunn, M.B.A., C.P.A. 



ACCOUNTING 

Usually regarded by business students as one of 
their best departments, the Accounting Division of 
the College of Business Administration rests its 
reputation on a progressive curriculum which has 
kept abreast of the yearly transformations in the 
business world. According to Department Chair- 
man Arthur L. Glynn, these changes are neces- 
sary in order to fulfill the department's main goal 
of providing business students with a "better con- 
cept of quantitative problems." At the elementary 
level, visual aids are used to acquaint students with 
current business practices, and the experimental 
"Control" course, inaugurated two years ago to pro- 
vide instruction in the handling of quantitative 
data, has now become a mandatory subject for 
sophomores. Still another recent innovation is the 
senior course in "Controllorship" for students inter- 
ested in industrial accounting. 

The department also encourages its members to 
obtain as much practical accounting experience as 
they possibly can. As a result a department tutorial 
program was developed in which upperclassmen 
aided underclassmen with their accounting prob- 
lems. Members of the Accounting Academy were 
also sent to the United Fund Headquarters to assist 
the organization with its accounting tasks. 




32 



Arthur L. Glynn, M.B.A., C.P.A. 
Chairman of the Department 




Walter J. Fimian, Jr., Ph.D. 



Rev. William D. Sullivan 
Chairman of the Department 




BIOLOGY 



Because of the extended opportunities which the 
biological sciences offer to undergraduate majors, 
the Biology Department is faced with the task of 
preparing its students for at least four essentially 
different careers. This requires a basically flexible 
curriculum designed to meet not only the needs of 
those who will do graduate work in research biology, 
but also the men who are preparing for dental and 
medical schools. 

A further consequence of this diversity of under- 
graduate interest is the large enrollment which has 
made the crowded conditions felt by most of the 
other science departments particularly acute here. 
It is, therefore, no surprise that Rev. William D. 
Sullivan, S.J. has expressed eager anticipation for 
the new Science Center which should ease the 
strain on the department's overcrowded facilities 
and allow a larger research program to be under- 
taken. Fr. Sullivan also looks forward to the devel- 
opment of a doctoral program in the near future. 



33 



Chai Hvun Yoon, Ph.D. 




BIOLOGY 




^ ^^-j 





James J. Gilroy, Ph.D. 




Robert M. Coleman, Ph.D. 




34 



Yu-chen Ting, Ph.D. 



BUSINESS LAW 

A man in the business world, whether he be a 
member of a large corporation or an independent 
merchant, cannot afford to be ignorant of the legal 
system which regulates our nation's commerce. In 
order to accomplish its objective of training future 
leaders for business and industry, the College of 
Business Administration must provide its students 
with at least a practical knowledge of the basic 
legal problems which confront the businessman in 
his day to day operations. 

The Department of Business Law offers under- 
graduates both general survey courses of legal busi- 
ness problems and more specialized courses in such 
areas as insurance, and labor and real estate law. 
"C.P.A. Law" is a particularly valuable course for 
those who are preparing examinations for certifi- 
cation in accounting. The first course in Business 
Law also includes an introduction to the nature 
and sources of law with particular emphasis on the 
United States Constitution and recent Supreme 
Court rulings. 

William B. Hickey, LL.M. 





James E. Shaw, LL.M., M.B.A. 
Chairman of the Department 




Phillip F. Garity, LL.M. 



35 




Robert F. O'Malley, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 



George Vogel, Ph.D. 



CHEMISTRY 




36 




David C. O'Donnell, Ph.D. 




The dark, cluttered hallways with a hint of sulphur mark 
rather precisely the Chemistry Department in the labyrinth 
of Devlin Hall. They are also indicative of the campus con- 
ditions under which the faculty and students must work. 
But Chairman Dr. Robert F. O'Malley is already busy 
making remodeling plans to be executed after the physics 
and biology departments have vacated their laboratories for 
the new Science Center. 

Dr. O'Malley's formula for the future? An increased 
emphasis on undergraduate research was his immediate 
reply. The additional space in Devlin will significantly ex- 
pand the research facilities of the department and make the 
present laboratories in Devlin Hall more efficient for in- 
struction. The purchase of specialized equipment such as 
the Moss-Bauer effect analyzer should also add impetus to 
student-faculty research. Furthermore, the installation of 
the IBM 1401 machine in the University Computer Center 
will vastly increase the potential of the department's 
research data processing. 

The research interests of the faculty span almost the en- 
tire horizon of the ever-developing field. Dr. O'Malley is 
himself researching the chemistry of nitrogen-fluorine 
compounds. In addition to his duties as moderator of the 
undergraduate journal of science, The Cosmos, Dr. Andre 
J. deBethune has been doing research in electrochemistry 
for the Department of the Interior and the Middle East 
Technological University in Ankara, Turkey took advan- 
tage of the services of Dr. Raymond F. Bogucki during his 
leave of absence last year. 



37 



Andre J. deBethune, Ph.D. 





Joseph Bornstein, Ph.D. 

CHEMISTRY 




Francis Bennett, Ph.D. 




Rev. Robert F. Healey, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 



CLASSICS 



Malcolm McLoud, A.M. 




Every body, whether poHtical, social, or 
individual, needs a head, and in this case it 
is Oxford and Harvard educated Rev. Robert 
F. Healey, S.J. Ever since his rather inaus- 
picious arrival several years ago, Fr. Healey 
has become the symbol, if not the very stan- 
dard bearer, for almost every liberal idea at 
B.C. The jolly, pipe-smoking priest is fond 
of his Oxford accent, but his intellectual 
achievements and scholarly publications 
have made him a highly-respected classical 
philologist in anyone's language. But above 
all we praise him for the compassion and 
human understanding which has more than 
once kept his office lighted into the small 
hours of the morning. To this rare indi- 
vidual we wish to express our appreciation. 

Each year the Classics Department itself 
graduates a small number of scholars who 
have done extensive work with original 
texts and advanced background materials. 
Most of these students study classics to pre- 
pare themselves for graduate school, though 
there are some who seek this background 
for professional careers in law and business. 

Rev. Oswald A. Reinhalter, S.J. 




39 



Rev. Robert J. McEwen, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 



ECONOMICS 



Harold A. Peterson, Ph.D. 






Leon Smohnski, Ph.D. 




Undergraduate majors in Economics at Boston 
College study the entire process by which men earn 
a living. This requires knowledge of diverse areas 
of our free enterprise system and of finance and 
trade on the international level as well. Therefore, 
elective courses span the range of basic economic 
theories from supply and the uses of labor and 
capital, to finance on national, local, and private 
levels. In fact, a recent revision of the curriculum 
now enables freshman economics majors to begin 
their studies in the field earlier, so that they can 
take advantage of this vdde spectrum of electives. 
Rev. Robert J. McEwen, S.J., Chairman of the 
Department, points with pride to the department's 
year to year improvement which, he says, has been 
evidenced by the excellent placement record of 
recent graduates in their chosen graduate schools 
and business positions. 

Because Economics is the largest department on 
campus, it has been able to attract a proportionately 
large faculty with widely varied backgrounds and 
interests as well as many grants and research proj- 
ects. At present, Boston College is the headquarters 
for the Catholic Economic Association, and Fr. 
McEwen serves as Secretary-Treasurer of the organ- 
ization, while Dr. Alice E. Bourneuf is the editor 
of the group's "Review of Social Economy." An- 
other member of the facult}'. Dr. Edward K. Smith, 
returned to his teaching position this year after 
serving for two years as Deputy Director of the 
Area Redevelopment Agency in Washington, D.C. 



Karl A. Wesolowski, Ph.D. 




Joseph P. McKenna, Ph.D. 



41 




H. Michael Mann, Ph.D. 



ECONOMICS 



Donald J. White, Ph.D. 





Conrad P. Cahgaris, Ph.D. 





Vincent C. Nuccio, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 



EDUCATION 



WiUiam C. Cottle, D.Ed. 





Sister Mary Josephina, C.S.J. 



43 




EDUCATION 



This is indeed the time for self-examination in 
the many schools and colleges of Boston College. 
The Education Policy Committee of the School of 
Education is entertaining several proposals concern- 
ing curriculum changes. Presently under considera- 
tion is a cutback in the number of required courses 
to five. Maintenance of a proper balance between 
professionally-oriented and liberal arts subjects 
presents several problems at a Catholic university. 
Undergraduates in the School of Education have 
in their four years at Boston College thirty credits 
in philosophy and theology combined, of which 
three are in the Philosophy of Education. An addi- 
tional thirty hours are devoted to electives in the 
major field, and an average of twenty hours are 
given to the professional sequence. The remainder 
of course hours are occupied with the central hu- 
manities core. 

Dr. Vincent C. Nuccio, Associate Dean of the 
School of Education reports that the M.A.T. and 
M.S.T. programs have been expanded and are going 
well at the present time. Dr. Nuccio is providing 
vigorous leadership in furthering the excellent repu- 
tation of this department by using its facilities for 
the optimum advantage of the university and the 
community. 



Katherine C. Cotter, Ph.D. 



Pierre D. Lambert, Ph.D. 





William M. Griffin, D.Ed. 



lohn F. Tra\ors, Jr., D.Ed. 




45 





Richard J. Bath, M.Ed. 



Robert P. O'Hara, Ph.D. 



EDUCATION 



Brian K. Marron, M.Ed. 



46 





John L. Mahoney, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 



ENGLISH 




Richard E. Hughes, Ph.D. 



47 




ENGLISH 






An English Department which places emphasis on the educa- 
tion and stimulation of its students, rather than exclusively on the 
scholarly research of its faculty is indeed a rare gem in the ocean; 
and Boston College is luckily a Mother-of-pearl. 

But this is not to deny the need for scholarship, because it is 
impossible to animate students without a prior facility with the 
subject-matter involved. Still, a professor who fails in the class- 
room cannot recoup his losses no matter how many books he 
publishes. The hand-to-hand contest in the classroom is decisive. 
In view of this. Department Chairman Dr. John L. Mahoney, 
and the members of his fine faculty have admirably succeeded in 
establishing a challenging curriculum taught, for the most part, 
by eminently qualified professors. 

Indicative of the department's reputation was the return this 
year of Sean O'Faolin as writer-in-residence at Boston College. 
During the second semester the famed Irish author counseled a 
creative writing group in cooperation with Dr. Leonard Casper, 
and conducted public lectures at Bapst Auditorium. Senior semi- 
nars, limited to a small group of superior students, were initi- 
ated by Dr. P. Albert Duhamel and Dr. Casper, while a new and 
successful art of the film course was also given a trial run in CBA 
this year by Miss Paula Vadeboncoeur, opening an entire new area 
in criticism to B.C. undergraduates. 

The future looks just as bright. New courses have been sug- 
gested by Dr. Mahoney in the fields of drama. Renaissance and 
American Literature, and in view of the past we can expect 
nothing but the best. 



Joseph A. Longo, Ph.D. 



Andrew Von Hendy, Ph.D. 



48 





Leonard R. Casper, Ph.D. 





Maurice J. Quinlan, Ph.D. 




John F. McCarthy, Ph.D. 



Thomas P. Hughes, Ph.D. 



49 



FINANCE 




by Carlo M. Flumiani, Ph.D. 




Rev. John J. L. Conins, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 



John A. Humphrey, M.B.A. 




Capital is a key term in the discussion of 
our system of free enterprise or, for that 
matter, in the discussion of any economic 
system. The availabihty and prudent man- 
agement of revenue is the cornerstone of 
any successful business organization. That 
alone justifies the existence of CBA's Fi- 
nance Department. But more than that the 
department investigates the sources and con- 
rol of revenue which is of vital interest to 
bankers and corporation executives alike as 
a basis for sound fiscal management. 

Financial management presupposes at 
least a basic knowledge of investments and 
the tax structure, so that the profit neces- 
sary to maintain a business can be accurately 
calculated. For a business engaged in inter- 
national trade, still further problems are 
encountered because of the discrepancy in 
international monetary systems and foreign 
exchange. All these are pertinent fields of 
inquiry covered by the Finance Depart- 
ment's curriculum. 



FINE ARTS 



A new member of the departmental fac- 
ulty this year is Mrs. Eleanor Carlo, who 
teaches courses in the History of Art. Dr. 
C. Alexander Peloquin, director of the Uni- 
versity Chorale, was named Composer-in- 
Residence. 

The Artist-in-Residence program has also 
become an integral part of the university 
life. For the first time this year, under the 
guidance of Allison Macomber, students 
participating in this program received a 
semester's credit for their accomplishments. 
This endeavor stresses appreciation in art 
through proficiency in the many modes of 
artistic expression and is highly regarded 
by the student participants as a means to 
attain intellectual satisfaction through self- 
expression. 

Originally conceived to provide a back- 
ground in the history of art for seniors at 
Boston College, the Fine Arts Department 
is currently developing its elective program 
in order to oflPer courses that will truly com- 
plement a liberal education at all levels. 
Already the classroom facilities have been 
consolidated, and a slide room is now avail- 
able to house the department's collection. 




Ferdinand L. Rousseve, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 




Mmmm t mn Josephine Von Henneberg, D. es L. 



51 



GEOLOGY 



Part of the attraction of a small, demanding 
department such as Geology is the close personal 
guidance which each faculty member is able to 
afford the students working under him. The depart- 
ment itself offers highly specialized courses with 
supervised field research. This research gives ample 
opportunity for a healthy exchange of ideas and 
techniques between master and apprentice. 

Much of the student-faculty research must of 
necessity take place during the summer months. 
During the past summer Rev. James W. Skehan, 
S.J., Chairman of the Department, participated in 
the American Geological Institute Writing Con- 
ference which is engaged in the preparation of a 
textbook for secondary schools. In addition, Fr. 
Skehan is involved in several tectonic projects sup- 
ported by the government. Professor George D. 
Brown, Jr. supervised student research on a geolog- 
ical survey last summer in Indiana. 

A uniquely important part of the facilities of 
this department is the Boston College Earth 
Sciences Research Center at the University of 
Colorado. This center affords undergraduates an 
opportunity for geological research during the sum- 
mer months. The success of this energetic under- 
taking is indicated quite forcibly by the enviable 
record of recent undergraduate majors attending 
some of this country's finest graduate schools. 





Emanuel G. Bombolakis, Ph.D. 




52 



Rev. James W. Skehan, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 



George D. Brown, Jr., Ph.D. 




HISTORY 



John R. Betts, Ph.D. 



The quality of an academic department is often mis- 
takenly judged by the number of doctoral degrees listed in 
the college catalogue, as if a mere number could ever 
express the scholarship and selfless dedication of a college 
professor. A college professor is a strange creature, to be 
sure. His manner is humble and retiring by nature, but 
his office is always open to our problems. Even if we have 
to wait our turn, his quick smile and helpful suggestions 
always send us away encouraged and determined. He is an 
intellectual, too. The History Department has many such 
men, but next year there will be one who is missing. For 
Dr. Paul Michaud is gone, and we wish him all the best 
of luck. 

Chairman Dr. Thomas H. O'Connor is looking forward 
to at least some improvements next year. Survey courses 
will be limited with emphasis put on elective courses in- 
volving more intensive study of shorter historical periods. 
The history courses which are presently required of A & S 
students in the sophomore and junior years will be shifted 
back to first and second years. Also students who give 
promise of exceptional achievement in the field of history 
will be chosen in their junior year to begin a research proj- 
ect under the direction of a faculty member. It is hoped 
that these projects will lead to honor theses.. 




Thomas H. O'Connor, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 



53 




William M. Daly, Ph.D. 



Raymond T. McNally, Ph.D. 




HISTORY 




Joseph T. Criscenti, Ph.D. 



54 



INTER-DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 



A modern university cannot afford to ]imit its 
scope to the culture and country in which it exists. 
We are coming to the ever increasing reahzation 
that we live in a world of men, not of nations. 
Consequently, the understanding of other peoples 
and their culture and our relations with them has 
become a more necessary part of a liberal education. 
The Inter-Departmental Program of Study was con- 
ceived with this exact idea in mind. The program 
offers appropriate courses selected from all the 
departments in the university and makes them 
available to any interested undergraduate. 

Inter-Departmental studies stress the areas of 
Asia, Latin America, Russia, and Linguistics. Each 
of these areas is organized under an administrative 
committee of which the Dean is Chairman. Secre- 
taries for these committees are outstanding men in 
their field such as Dr. Paul M. Michaud of the Asian 
studies, Dr. Lawrence G. Jones for Slavic studies, 
and Dr. Joseph T. Criscenti for Latin-American 
studies. In each field of concentration, the courses 
have been organized to give the student a com- 
prehensive idea of the history, language, literature, 
and societies which prevail in that particular part 
of the world. 




Joseph T. Criscenti, Ph.D. 




Paul M. Michaud, Ph.D. 




Lawrence G. Jones, Ph.D. 



55 



MARKETING 



The complexity and variety of goods now being 
produced in this country requires a careful scientific 
investigation of available markets. Marketing re- 
search relies heavily upon the studies of consumer 
attitudes by behavioral scientists, and anticipates 
future needs dictated by fluctuating economic and 
social conditions. Statistical analysis is also an inval- 
uable tool for determining the extent of any market. 

Consequently, the methodology of the marketing 
specialist must, of necessity, be oriented toward 
influencing consumer habits. Effective advertising 
presentations, implemented by the extensive use of 
mass media, represent perhaps the single most im- 
portant factor in successful marketing. Sales and 
retailing management are also vital for the co- 
ordination and control of marketing strategy. 

Therefore, marketing courses attempt to acquaint 
the business student with the many sophisticated 
tools of the marketing profession by demanding 
student research into actual industrial needs and 
policies. Experience gained in this manner makes 
the Marketing major all the more valuable to the 
business world which awaits him. 




Joseph E. Devine, M.B.A. 



Gerald F. Price, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 




Henry P. McDonald, A M. 




56 



Joseph D. O'Brien, Ph.D. 




MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics has almost universal significance 
in any academic community, both as a discipfine 
in itself and as an invaluable tool to the other 
sciences. Because of the extent of its applications 
in the analysis and processing of data, the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics must play a particularly 
challenging role on the college campus. The diverse 
involvements of the department are evidenced by 
the many faculty interests. Dr. Joseph A. Sullivan, 
Associate Chairman of the Department, has re- 
cently published Intermediate Analysis of which 
he is a co-author. Presently, Drs. Rene Marcou and 
Rose Ring are working under U. S. Air Force Re- 
search Grants, while Dr. Samuel Holland, Jr. is 
doing research with the support of a National 
Science Foundation grant. 

The Mathematics Institute, under the direction 
of Rev. Stanley J. Bezuszka, S. J., Chairman of the 
Department, is involved in the application of com- 
puter techniques. The university facilities have re- 
cently been augmented by the acquisition of an 
IBM 1401 computer and accessories. The Institute 
is also involved in the administration of the N.S.F. 
summer training program for secondary school 
teachers. 



Rev. Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 



Joseph A. Sulhvan, Ph.D. 



*' 



Paul T. Banks, A.M. 





Samuel S. Holland, Jr., Ph.D. 



MATHEMATICS 



Robert J. LeBlanc, A.M. 




Rene ]. Marcou, Ph.D. 




Colonel John L. Murphy, U.S.A. 
Chairman of the Department 




Captain Floyd J. Schafer, U.S.A. 




MILITARY SCIENCE 




S/Major William L. Cote, U.S.A. 




Captain James W. Clark, U.S.A. 

In the affluent American society, college students are 
often accused of being wild and weak willed. But the 
Boston College R.O.T.C. Brigade and its Military Science 
program are ample proof that at least some of us have the 
ability and courage to be leaders of men. 

During the war years, the R.O.T.C. program was 
founded at the Heights to train intelligent young men as 
officers to aid in the war effort. The tradition of those 
early recruits is still with us today, and every year Boston 
College graduates an average of seventy-five men who 
receive their commissions together with their diplomas. Of 
this number approximately ten become career officers in 
the Regular Army. 

The new Chairman of the Military Science Department, 
Col. John L. Murphy, formerly of the Army General Staff 
in Washington, D.C., characterized the present year as a 
transitional period. The new administration brought \'\ath 
it new concepts which will need time to take root. For 
example, the government is presently negotiating a con- 
tract to establish Military Science scholarships. Also under 
consideration is a provision to enable transfer students to 
complete their previous R.O.T.C. training at B.C. Col. 
Murphy also emphasized the close cooperation between 
the Army and the University administration. Such collab- 
oration is vital for the success of a joint program, embrac- 
ing not only academic but Military Science courses as well. 



M/Sgts. Toplvn, Matney; SFC. Budgell 

Hi Hi-* 





Paul A. Boulanger, Ph.D. 



Normand R. Carder, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 





Hilda Calabro, A.M. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



If the Common Market experiment is any indication of a 
modern trend, we may some day have a universal language serving 
a world brotherhood. But until the advent of that Golden Age, the 
study of linguistics will still be the first condition for communi- 
cation and understanding among the cultures of the globe. For 
this reason there can be no excuse for a second-rate Modern 
Language Department at Boston College. 

The Modern Language Department is at least planning. Among 
the many new offerings now anticipated by the department's new 
Chairman, Dr. Norman A. Cartier, is the creation of an Italian 
major, as well as Master of Arts programs in German and Italian. 
In addition, a pilot course in Portugese is now being organized by 
Dr. Norman Araujo, a new faculty member this year. 

Such ambitious plans for expansion will necessitate department 
members fluent in their chosen language and knowledgeable of the 
customs and literature of the people. The encouragement of a 
sympathetic administration and the scholarship of the present 
faculty should certainly provide a beginning. 



Norman Araujo, Ph.D. 




Robert L. Sheehan, Ph.D. 




NURSING 




Dorothy R. Bagnell, R.N., M.S. 



Eileen M. Ryan, R.N., M.S 





Marie Cullinane, R.N., M.S. 




Jane Bender, R.N., M.S. 



62 






AUce Dowd, R.N., M.S. 




Joyce Dwyer, R.N., M.S. 



A Student nurse at Boston College receives not 
only the finest professional training at some of the 
nation's leading hospitals, but also a liberal educa- 
tion in the finest tradition of Jesuit academic dis- 
cipline. In a singular effort to maintain these stand- 
ards of excellence, Dean Rita P. Kelleher has 
worked during the past year to bring the nursing 
program into line with the curriculum revisions 
suggested in the Self-Study Program initiated by the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Furthermore, the 
clinical faculty was enlarged to preserve the low 
ratio of students to supervisors, a prerequisite for 
superior professional training. Also for the first 
time. Registered Nurses were admitted into the 
basic program with the possibility for advance 
standing. 

Several factors clearly point to the growth of the 
B. C. Nursing School's distinguished reputation. 
At present over half of the students in the school 
are resident students whose homes lie outside New 
England. Several members of the school's faculty 
are currently engaged in a research project in co- 
operation with Brandeis University. A follow-up 
study is being made of 1 500 aged persons who were 
discharged from metropolitan hospitals and return- 
ed either to their own homes or to nursing homes. 




Mary C. Kirk, R.N., M.S. 



63 




Phvllis Bromwell, R.N., M.Ed. 




Teresa J. Mould, R.N., M.Ed. 




Florence T. Brickett, R.N., M.Ed. 



NURSING 





'-^ ^ - *^-... 




Ruth Monroy, R.N., M.S. 



64 




Priscilla M. Andrews, R.N., M.S. 




Anne Marie McPeak, R.N., M.S. 





Eleanor F. Voorhies, R.N., M.A. 
Marguerite F. Fogg, R.N., M.S. 



M. Evelyn Sheehan, R.N., M.S. 




65 




Rev. Frederick J. Adlemann, SJ. 
Chairman of the Department 



The position of philosophy in a CathoHc univer- 
sity was originally conceived as an integrating 
one — a bond of unity between the various 
academic disciplines and the Christian historical 
tradition. Although this idealized conception has 
never been fully realized in the past, revisions 
inspired by the A&S Self-Study Program are now 
guiding the Department of Philosophy towards 
becoming a more effective force in the core 
curriculum. 

Significant changes which have been introduced 
this year are the reduction of the freshman phil- 
osophy requirement to one semester and the devel- 
opment of a course entitled "Christian Moral 
Issues" as an alternative to the second semester 
senior course in "Ethical Problems." "Christian 
Moral Issues" discusses traditional moral problems 
in view of both ethical principles and Christian 
Revelation . 

Congratulations are certainly due to the de- 
partment for the extensive program of electives in 
the History of .Philosophy made available to seniors 
for the first time this year. A course in the "Phil- 
osophy of Art" was offered in addition to several 
graduate courses to be elected by qualified majors 
and non-majors. It is hoped that this pioneering 
spirit will be a stimulus to further changes in the 
philosophy curriculum, perhaps patterned after 
courses now in the Honors Program. 

Rev. Alexander G. Duncan, S.J. 



66 





PHILOSOPHY 



William J. Haggerty, Jr., Ph.D. 





Norman J. WeDs, Ph.D. 



Stuart B. Martin, Ph.D. 



67 





Idella J. Gallagher, Ph.D. 



Thomas J. Owens, Ph.D. 





PHILOSOPHY 



Rev. Francis P. Molloy, S.J. 



Donald A. Gallagher, Ph.D. 




I 




Rev. Richard T. Murphy, S.J. 



69 



PHYSICS 




Rev. Francis A. Liuima, SJ. 



The growth of physics in the world today is as rapid as the 
passing of time; and the apphcations of the laws of physics are as 
vast and limitless as the far reaches of space itself. In order to 
prepare its majors for future study and to provide the capabilities 
necessary to approach the unknown problems of tomorrow, the 
Department of Physics stresses a deeply-rooted knowledge of the 
fundamental principles of classical and modern physics, as well 
as a facility for developing the intimate interrelationship between 
the physical laws and their precise mathematical expression. 

Faculty members in this department are actively engaged in 
theoretical and experimental research. Under grants fi'om the U.S. 
Air Force, Dr. Joseph H. Chen and Rev. James J. Devhn, S.J. are 
currently at work on projects in solid state physics and spectros- 
copy, respectively. Dr. Robert Carovillano, presently on leave of 
absence, is also engaged in an Air Force research project. In addi- 
tion, Dr. Robert L. Becker is doing research in neutron physics, 
supported by a grant from the Atomic Energy Commission. 



Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 

Acting Chairman of the Department 




70 




Joseph H. Chen, Ph.D. 




Darryl J. Leiter, Ph.D. 



Edward V. Jezak, Ph.D. 




71 




Edgar Litt, Ph.D 



Paul T. HefFron, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 





Peter S. H. lang, Ph.D. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Politics, like taxes and the weather, is one of the 
most popular topics in every-day conversation. But 
in actuality the common man knows far less about 
the rules and regulations of American political life 
than is ordinarily assumed, let alone the pohtical 
structure of Asia or even Europe. To instill a 
basic knowledge of the governmental forms which 
have been and are now guiding the nations of the 
globe is the guiding principle of the Political Sci- 
ence Department of Boston College. Special empha- 
sis is, quite naturally, placed on our own political 
system at the local, state and national levels, and, 
although the historical approach is primary, most 
courses are taught with an eye toward future prob- 
lems which might beset our rapidly-expanding 
nation. 

During the past year, the Political Science De- 
partment was fortunate to have Dr. Peter Odegard 
as visiting professor from the University of Califor- 
nia at Berkeley. Pierre-Michel Fontaine, who has 
special interests in Latin American Governments 
and Politics, also joined the faculty as lecturer. Two 
members of the present faculty, Dr. Paul T. 
HefFron, Chairman of the Department, and Dr. 
Gary P. Brazier were on leaves of absence. Dr. 
HefFron did research for a forthcoming book, while 
Dr. Brazier, working under a Ford Foundation 
grant, served as special assistant for reseaixh to 
Boston Mayor John Collins. 



PRODUCTION 

The successful organization and efficient 
operation of a financial enterprise are the 
primary concerns of Production students. 
Majors in the Production Department mas- 
ter skills in business management while 
acquiring an appreciation of and insights 
into the complex engineering problems 
involved in today's industry. Courses in 
"Personnel Management" and "Production 
Controls" are aimed at providing students 
with basic facts and policies for future top- 
level management decisions. Special con- 
sideration is given to the value of statistical 
analysis and the use of electronic data pro- 
cessing for the determination of optimum 
production conditions and a consequently 
sound business organization. 

Student participation in actual operations, 
research of simulated problems in the field, 
and more extensive application of mathe- 
matics to the problems of production are 
encouraged. During the past summer Dr. 
Charles H. Savage, Jr. of the department's 
faculty made trips to Peru and Colombia 
where he supervised studies in industrial 
locations. 






Justin C. Cronin, M.B.A. 
Chairman of the Department 




Edgar F. Huse, Ph.D. 



Albert J. Simone, Ph.D. 



73 




PSYCHOLOGY 

The Department of Psychology is another of the 
many departments on campus with a program of 
electives designed to meet the heeds of both majors 
and students who wish a basic understanding of 
human behavior to supplement some other major 
field of study. Psychology majors are required to 
take both general and more specialized courses 
within the department including "Experimental 
Psychology" and "Statistics in Psychology." Majors 
are also urged to take courses in biology to fulfill 
their science requirements. To meet the needs of 
the increasing number of majors, the department 
has undergone a sizeable expansion of its physical 
facilities. Several classrooms have been added, and 
animal experimental laboratories are available to 
undergraduate and graduate students. 

The departmental faculty was also increased 
with the appointments of Instructor Harold N. 
Kellner, and Dr. Marc A. Fried who is studying the 
significant contemporary problem of redevelopment 
and mental health. Other members of the depart- 
ment are also engaged in research. Dr. William P. 
Pare is investigating aging and stress, supported by 
a grant from the National Institute of Health; and 
Rev. James F. Moynihan, S. J., Chairman of the 
Department, is studying the screening of applicants 
for religious life. 




Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 



WilHam P. Pare, Ph.D. 



John M. vonFelsinger, Ph.D. 




Buford Rhea, Ph.D. 



John D. Donovan, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 




SOCIOLOGY 

The motivating aim of the Department of Soci- 
ology is the presentation of the fundamental struc- 
ture and problems of American society, and more 
basically, to provide courses which probe deeper into 
specialized areas in the field. Majors in sociology 
are trained in sociological analysis, research, and 
theory as a basis for a career in social work or for 
graduate study. Top majors are urged to participate 
in honors seminars and in the preparation of an 
honors thesis. 

This year the department increased its academic 
depth with the appointment to its faculty of Dr. 
Frances D. Powell and Madeleine D. Giguere. 
Miss Giguere has interests in demography and the 
sociology of medicine; Dr. Powell in social structure 
and personality. Dr. John D. Donovan, Chairman 
of the Department, indicated that the Institute of 
Human Relations should provide help for recruit- 
ing new faculty as well as for the broadening of 
research and course subjects, particularly for gradu- 
ate students. 

At present, the members of the department are 
associated with diverse writing and research pro- 
jects. Dr. Donovan, in addition to his own books, is 
serving as the editor for a proposed series entitled 
Contemporary Vrohlenis in Sociology. Dr. Buford 
Rhea is designing research proposals for study in 
the sociology of education. Dr. Powell is developing 
research proposals on the relationship between men- 
tal disorders and social classes. 



75 



SPEECH 



The success or failure of a businessman is often 
due to his ability to formulate his ideas and opinions 
logically and, even more importantly, to express 
them clearly and forcefully. The courses offered bv 
the Speech Department are aimed at developing 
this oral facility through mastery of effectual public 
speaking techniques. 

While it is, indeed, one of the smaller depart- 
ments on campus, it is ensured an increasing role 
in the academic life of Boston College. The courses 
are already over-subscribed, and the reduction of 
the required curriculum in the College of Arts & 
Sciences should permit still more students to choose 
this valuable elective. Presently, undergraduates in 
both CBA and the School of Education receive in- 
struction in the department, in the hope that their 
professional competency might be enhanced and 
allow them to be more effective in their presenta- 
tions, be it at a business meeting or in the classroom. 




John Henry Lawton, Ph.D. 
Chairman of the Department 



76 




J. Paul Marcoux, Ph.D. 



Rev. Joseph M. Larkin, S.J 



THEOLOGY 




Rev. Robert T. Ferrick, S.J 



Rev. James J. Casey, S.J. 
Chairman of the Department 




Rev. Edward T. Douglas, S.J. 





Rev. Joseph P. Carew, S.J. 



The important position of theology at a Catholic uni- 
versity has never been underestimated at Boston College, 
and under the guidance of its Chairman, Rev. James J. 
Casey, S.J., the department is presently designing changes 
to make it a more effective part of the Christian academic 
community. These changes were prefigured some years ago 
with the development of a series of lectures with visiting 
speakers of many different persuasions for senior honors 
theology. This year the department finally inaugurated a 
new twelve-credit program to replace the sixteen-credit 
program of previous years. According to Fr. Casey the 
department has also adopted faculty-student recommenda- 
tions for courses in ethical philosophy, particularly as 
regards the relationship of ethics to both supernatural 
revelation and human reason. This decision resulted in the 
creation of a new course in "Christian Moral Issues." 

Members of the Theology Department have also been 
engaged in the ecumenical movement outside tTie univer- 
sity. Fr. Casey was invited by the Newman Club of Sim- 
mons College to deliver lectures on biblical theology. 
Rev. Robert T. Ferrick, S.J. attended courses on ecu- 
menism at Boston University; he later conducted seminars 
under Dr. Nils Ehrenstrom in several parts of the country. 
Also in the department. Rev. Anselm Murphy, O.S.B. 
has been dividing his time between teaching and investi- 
gations in education. Rev. Paul J. Murphy, S.J. has studied 
the adaptation of the social encyclicals to the role of Catho- 
lics in contemporary society. 




Rev. Maurice V. Dullea, S.J. 



THEOLOGY 





Rev. Miles L. Fay, S.J. 



Rev. Joseph J. Connor, S.J. 




Rev. Patrick J. Ryan, S.J. 



79 



to 



Elegantly dressed in top hat and tads, ■ the smding master oj 
ceremonies strode confidently to the center of the stage. He -paused for 
a moment to rally his thoughts, and then, in his own gay, nonchalant 
style, proceeded to lift his audience into the colorful world of myrth 
and entertainment. Thus began Junior Week, 1964 and the personal 
triumph of Ronald Paid Nief. 

Ron Nief is a very capable young man, and although his vision is 
impaired, the handicap has never hindered him from having a more 
than usually active life. The senior English major taught himself to 
play the piano and bass viol even before he came to B.C., and the large 
rhythm instrument has been almost identified with him ever since his 
arrival here. Moreover, Ron's excellent voice has made him an outstand- 
ing member of the University Chorale to which he has devoted most 
of his energy while at the Heights. This year he was elected vice- 
president of that organization. 

But Ron's greatest moment at Boston College was Junior Week. 
His agile imagination carried him into almost every phase of the week's 
activities. For the Junior Show, Guys and Dolls, the good-natured dorm 
student conducted and played in the orchestra, not to mention his brief 
characterization on the stage. At the Junior Prom and the Chad Mitchell 
Concert, Ron also entertained the entire class as master of ceremonies, 
and the enthusiastic response he received is evidence enough of his great 
success. 

These, then, are the components of a memorable personality , and 
though in the years to come, we will probably remember him towering 
over Lionel Hampton, still his active envolvement in university life and 
accomplished musical ability have made all of us appreciate the many 
talents of Ron Nief. 



80 




KTi 



< 



Elegani 
ceremonies 
a niomcy' '■ 
stvle. y 
an 
tri 

in: 



p Jiat ancL 



[U'l nui^tvr of 

ii'^rj for 

hi ^^.^_, . i^n halant 

/ world n^^jjjmwth 

and the peMinial 

■'''Wiigh his visit 
i'lU. having a tkon 

'aiwfmS^fir-f'ii 
I'lmi ith fm^^ f\ sinc^ k 
h I snnnl^lkiM' n ' i mlfTtai' . I 
Inch Wcn^'ih^otedpu'K.i 
electMhice- 



'r^ 



' ,•- Jiiniar Week. 
of the week's 
ed dorm 




80 




w^^. 





The Campus Council was established in 1959 as an 
aid to student government in coordinating campus-wide 
activities. This job has become increasingly difficult as 
the University has grown in size and scope, creating 
new kinds of organizational problems. 

John Hodgeman has provided dynamic leadership and 
foresight in attempting to solve these problems during the 
past year. His trip to Washington as representative of 
Boston College at the Student Leader Conference called 
by President Johnson is an indication of his personal 
stature. Under his guidance, the Council set up two new 
groups to meet the challenge of our expanding University. 
The Student Congress was founded as a forum for student 
opinion on University matters. The Council also organized 
the Activities Committee to facilitate its own operation, 
and, for the first time, a long needed Student Directory 
was completed. 

These progressive steps are matched by several more 
still in the planning stages. The Judicial Systems Study 
Committee is investigating the possibility of inserting a 
student court in the governmental structure. The Aca- 
demic Affairs Committee hopes to initiate student par- 
ticipation on the Academic Boards of the various colleges 
of the University. 

All these innovations are only a part of the far-reaching 
activities of the Council which affect every student every 
day. From the orientation mixers to the Billy Graham 
lecture, the Campus Council has earned our highest praise. 



"I knew I would regret not taking shorthand. 



82 





STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



"Quiet! I'm thinking. 




"For the last time, six from ten is four." 



83 



The student government organization at Boston 
College also includes a separate and independent 
Student Senate within each college. 

In the College of Arts and Sciences the Student 
Senate conducts a varied program of academic and 
service activities. The Maurice J. Tobin lectures 
bring renowned figures in the area of international 
affairs to Boston College. Lectures in the past have 
featured Arnold Toynbee, Clement Atlee, Henry 
Cabot Lodge, and other famous personalities. The 
A&S Senate points with special pride to its Tutorial 
Program. Students in need of academic assistance 
are provided with a volunteer tutor in their major 
field. Chairman of the Senate, John Griffin reports 
a 50% decrease in dropouts since the inception of 
the program. 

Among the many projects conducted by the 
Senate in the College of Business Administration 

is the Sullivan Award Banquet. The senior who, in 
the eyes of his classmates, best typifies the business 
school student is honored at this event. 

In addition. Chairman William Drummey has 
initiated an investigation into the role of the day 
student in university-wide activities. It is hoped 
that a number of helpful proposals will result, 
facilitating the coordination of activities between 
commuting students and those that live in campus 
residences. 








The School of Education Senate, under the 
chairmanship of James SulHvan, started a number 
of new programs this year. A lecture and film series 
was conducted during the Spring term, while a 
Dean's Advisory Council was organized to facilitate 
communication between the Administration and 
the student body. These, together with the peren- 
nial responsibilities of the Education Senators such 
as the Skits and Christmas Assembly, comprised 
the bulk of the group's responsibilities. 

The Women's Council is a governmental orga- 
nization representing the women of the School of 
Education. The Council, led by Marie Brescia, acts 
as an advisory board to the Dean of Women 
and sponsors the annual Mother-Daughter Fashion 
Show and a lecture series. 

Student government of the School of Nursing 

actively pursues a double purpose: to direct intel- 
lectual, social and spiritual activities among stu- 
dents and to represent the student community 
before the faculty and administration for the pro- 
motion of college and university interests. President 
Betsy O'Neil organized a wide field of activities 
ranging from the annual Winter Whirl to the 
presentation of distinguished speakers experienced 
in nursing. The Nursing Senate also initiated an 
Intercollegiate Nursing Day which brought rep- 
resentatives from all collegiate nursing schools in 
New England to Boston College. 








The Evening College Student Council, on the other 
hand, is of necessity isolated from the undergraduate divi- 
sion. But this did not hinder President Dennis Corkery 
from organizing his night-time scholars for the annual 
Christmas party which carried Christmas "good will" to 
many an underprivileged child in the Boston area. The cold 
north winds also brought the relaxing ski-weekend. 

The newest thing at the student government roundtable 
these days is the Graduate Nursing Senate. The young 
graduate nursing program brought novel problems of 
orientation and readjustment, and Chairman Eileen Calla- 
han and her fellow officers have worked earnestly to 
matriculate the Graduate Nurses into University life. To 
achieve this goal, professional and social events were 
planned, where the Nurses found both knowledge and 
enjoyment. 

Reorganized this year into a separate committee, the 
Nursing Dormitory Council devoted most of its energy 
to representing the large number of basic nurses who live 
in the many off-campus residences maintained by the Uni- 
versity. The Council worked closely with Mrs. Marion 
Mahoney and Fr. Edward J. Hanrahan, S.J., directors of 
Women's and Men's Residences respectively, so that com- 
plaints and improvements could be acted upon as quickly 
as possible. The Council also was instrumental in the plan- 
ning of last February's Winter Weekend. 

The Council of Resident Men made its usual signifi- 
cant contributions to the life of the University this year. 
Under the presidency of Jerry Rafaniello, the Council con- 
ducted the Freshman Orientation Program last September, 
organized the intramural football season within the dorms 
(Fitz-3 garnered the coveted Mud Bowl trophy as they 
swam to victory early in December) and "Shindig," the 
Council's wonderful winter weekend. 





k^ \ K^Ot 





89 



UNIVERSITY SODALITIES 




"We bought this typewriter with the coupons. 
"I wonder how much we could get for this typewriter?" 





You can use them for wallpapter too 




"My group had 36% fewer cavities 



"My group had the other 64 % . 





Marlboro Country 




"Now read this copy! 



The Sodality Tradition, founded by the Belgian 
Jesuit, John Leunis, more than four centuries ago, 
has as its ukimate purpose "the development of 
informed and mature Cathohcs, men and women 
spiritually and intellectually competent to cope 
with the challenges of their day." 

.The B. C. Women Sodalists were equally active, 
perhaps less spectacularly, but nevertheless impor- 
tantly. Prefect Dottie Jewell's Nursing Sodality 
sponsored activities for patients at the St. John of 
God Hospital in Brighton, while Carol Milan's 
Education group tutored at the Denison House in 
Roxbury in cooperation with the Men's Sodality 
Apostolic Tutoring Program headed by Carmen 
Fucillo. 

Aiding the Sodality in its program of Catholic 
Action is the Saint John Berchman Society. 

Founded three years ago to provide assistance at all 
religious functions in the Dormitory area, the 
servers have become increasingly important in view 
of the new liturgical changes in the Church. Dur- 
ing the past year, Gerald Burke opened a program 
of instruction to educate new members in the real 
art of assisting the priest at the sacrificial altar. 




"There's a flv on the ceiHng." 




Service to God 



93 



"I dare you to thay that again!" 




BOSTON COLLEGE EAGLES' BAND 



Cool music at the Forum. 






There is one group of students in which the 
B. C. spirit never dies — the Boston College 
Eagles Band. Win, lose, or draw, these ardent and 
talented musicians are always there, always rooting, 
always "For Boston". Their precision marching on 
the football field and impromptu performances at 
basketball and hockey games have always been a 
boost to sagging morale. Their all-around ability as 
a marching band is recognized year after year in 
competition throughout the east. In the annual 
St. Patrick's Day Parade in New York City, the 
band always brings home top honors. 

Most are aware of the marching side of the 
Eagle's band but few are conscious of its more 
subtle aspects. Mr. Peter Siragusa waves the group 
from the familiar "rah-rah " music to the more 
sophisticated with a flick of the wrist. In their 
annual spring concert, the Band once again proved 
its ability in a selection of delightful and spontane- 
ous melodies ranging from the Beatles to Beethoven. 



Band Color Guard. 




"Before Ringo, I was. 



Band in Boston. 





Chorale in concert 



C. C. and Ginger 





"Anxiety personified." 



UNIVERSITY 







1965 University Chorale Officers. 



CHORALE 




The Boston College Chorale is a highly skilled vocal 
group which has provided many enjoyable hours of cultural 
entertainment throughout the year. The men and women 
are under separate supervision, but the able hands of 
C. Alexander Peloquin moulded these opposites into a 
delicate and precise harmony. Presidents William Kelly 
and Kathy Edwards demanded a great deal from their 
choruses, but the results were rewarding both for the 
participants and the audiences. A student at B.C. has 
missed an enriching and entertaining experience if he or 
she has never attended a concert. The Chorale's repertoire 
covers a wide range, and there is always one concert that 
will appeal to any student's tastes — spiritual, pop, or 
classical. From the inspiring themes of Vivaldi's Gloria 
to the folk-song rhythms of Orff's Carmina Burona, the 
Chorale's mellifluous strains have spread throughout New 
England, and this year the group was honored by invi- 
tations to perform at many universities and before a wide 
diversity of groups. For the benefit of the students, the 
Chorale extends similar invitations to other universities, 
but none has equalled our own. The Chorale is certainly 
an invaluable contribution towards the achievement of 
a cultural atmosphere on the University campus. 



97 



Lewis Memorial Drill Team. 




98 




Rifle Team. 




Nineteen Hundred Sixty-Five was a year of 
change for the Boston College R.O.T.C. Unit as 

PMS Lt. Col. John Wood, Jr. departed for active 
duty in Korea, and Col. John Leo Murphy arrived 
to assume his new administrative duties at the 
Heights. In typical Army style, the transition was 
smooth and is a tribute to the discipline of the 
Brigade and its able Commander, Cadet Colonel 
John T. Browne, Jr. As proof, we need only men- 
tion the smart marching exhibition of the entire 
Unit at the Detroit Football game in November, 
and the Military Mass and Review in the Spring. 
The Lewis Drill Team, commanded by Cadet 
Colonel Peter Olivieri, also continued its impressive 
performance at contests in Massachusetts and along 
the entire east coast. 

But even soldiers need recreation. The long to be 
remembered parties at the Officer's Club at the 
Boston Army Base, the Nazareth Day festivities in 
the spring, all were functions organized by the 
Cadet Officer's Club. The social highlight of the 
season, however, was the Club's annual Military 
Ball in February. Here the cadets and their dates 
danced to the music of Ken Reeves and his orches- 
tra, then looked on as the 1965 Mihtary Ball Queen 
and her court were presented to the invited guests. 



R.O.T.C. Military Mass. 



C.O.C. Officers. 






1965 Key Holders. 



Often referred to as the Professional Usher 
Society of Boston College, the Gold Key shoulders 
an undeserved share of student criticism. Dedicated 
to the service of the University, the Key performs 
many of the tasks which bear little or no glory, and 
yet are vital to the functioning of the school as 
a whole. 

Backed by a strong tradition of twenty-five years, 
this year's president, Joseph Cutcliff ably assisted 
by his fellow officers Paul Connelly, Dick Cullen, 
and Neil Harte, continued to provide important 
assistance at all college events. The Key is a unique 
activity in that it is concerned not with itself, but 
in offering help to the other activities on campus. 
It serves as a means of setting up and coordinating 
all events of the University. Perhaps the labor is 
menial but, more important, it is meaningful. 

In addition to supporting the events of other 
activities, the Gold Key sponsored the Syracuse and 
Holy Cross rallies, a closed retreat at the Gloucester 
Retreat House, and the Cotillion Dinner-Dance. 
The Gold Key and the departing Keyholders de- 
serve congratulations and thanks for four years of 
spirited service. 



Question? 




"Now, we've been getting dumped on . . ." 




GOLD KEY SOCIETY 



Answer! 




The key opens the door. 




101 




''Methinks she's dead.' 




DRAMATIC 




"Five and five is ten — you get it?" 



102 




Dramatic Society Officers 



SOCIETY 




In its ninety-ninth season, the Boston College 
Dramatic Society displayed agility uncommon in 
a near-centenarian. To celebrate William Shake- 
speare's four hundredth anniversary, President Ed 
McDonough and moderator Fr. Joseph Larken, S.J. 
decided on a comedy-tragedy festival, selecting the 
humorous Taming of the Shreiv and the more soul- 
searching drama Othello. 

Under the direction of Dr. J. Paul Marcoux, half 
the company explored the understated intricacies 
of Othello. Frank Romer created an imposing Moor 
and Paul O'Brien's crafty, possessed lago carried 
the show. 

Very much at home in comedy, the society's 
moderator. Father Joseph Larkin, directed The 
Taming of the Shrew. John Teter (the director of 
the Junior Show) played Petruchio to Janice 
Ryan's Katherine. Individuals were difficult to 
pick out in this production, but Thomas Trevisane's 
portrayal of Tranio, the fool-turned-master, was 
unmistakeable in posture and timing. 

The reviews of Shreiv were unanimous in their 
approval. Dr. Mary Kinnane exclaimed that it was 
". . . the Society's best production in ten years." A 
little more restrained but equally impressed. Dr. 
P. Albert Duhamel commented that he enjoyed the 
production ". . . as a play rather than as history." 
The remainder of the year was marked by a series of 
one act plays as well as Arthur Miller's attack on 
guilt-by-association, The Crucible. 



"Goldilocks and the Tluw Inars 



"Forsooth; I am the Jolly Green Giant." 




103 



FULTON DEBATING SOCIETY 




1 quotu iroiii jja^e 1491, Art. 7, par. 2, 



Fulton Officers 



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Again this year the Fulton Debating Team amassed 
an impressive array of trophies representative of successful 
competition throughout the country. Joseph McLaughhn, 
spurred by memories of third and second place finishes 
in the National Championships at West Point in 1963 
and 1964 respectively, demanded dedicated industry from 
the team's twenty members. President McLaughhn and 
Vice-President John Raedel teamed to bring home impres- 
sive honors, leading the team to first place finishes in the 
Kentucky, Loyola (Chicago) and Eastern Nazarene 
tournaments. Joe, following in the steps of last year's 
leading debater, Jim Unger, was quick to snare individual 
honors in three early tournaments and seemed sure to 
break Jim's impressive personal performances. 

This talented group is coached by Dr. John H. Lawton, 
a perfectionist who has been tireless in adjusting minute 
details in argument and presentation of the year's topic: 
Resolved: that the Federal Government should estabhsh 
a national program of public work for the unemployed. 
It was these small points that proved instrumental in train- 
ing the freshman team, priming them to continue the 
highly intellectual and superbly articulate tradition of the 
Fulton Debating Society. 

The Robert Bellarniine Law and Government Acade- 
my is dedicated to counsefing pre-legal and political science 
students in the pursuit of their professions. President 
Michael Hardy scheduled an impressive calendar of 
guest speakers and films directed toward achieving this 
goal. Highlighting the year's events were talks by 
Rev. Robert Drinan, S.J., Dean of B.C. Law School, and 
Dr. Peter Odegard, visiting professor from the University 
of Cahfornia, an eminent authority in the field of Ameri- 
can political history and theory. The lectures and con- 
ferences, open to all students, were very successful in 
exploring the areas of politics and law and in directing 
students toward appropriate graduate study in these fields. 



"And 'a one and 'a two . 



BELLARMINE 
ACADEMY 




"We sing too." 



105 




"My eyes are 'right wing' too." 




"Let's close our eyes and see what the Rcpubhcans do." 



The presidential election year of 1964 goaded 
the three political organizations (Young Repub- 
licans, Young Democrats, and YAF) to unprece- 
dented activity. The value of the energy expended 
by the individuals in these groups is not properly 
judged by the results of national, state, or local 
elections, but in terms of the work done on campus. 
In this respect, no one of the organizations can be 
given top billing. During the four weeks prior to 
the. election, the campus was literally swamped 
with pins, pamphlets, papers, and politicians in an 
attempt to educate the student to vote the proper 
party-line. One would be hard pressed to defini- 
tively state which group was responsible for the 
most votes at the polls (it would appear that 
the Young Democrats established a wide margin), 
but it can certainly be said that each group was 
deeply concerned with persuading a mature student 
body to vote a straight ticket. 

An impressive array of speakers was scheduled 
during the campaign months in this pervasive at- 
tempt to encourage voters. Highlighting the speak- 
ers was the YAF'S sponsoring of Elizabeth Miller, 
who talked and answered questions about the con- 
servative wing of the Republican party for most 
of an afternoon. 

Allegiances and political beliefs may differ in 
each student, but each of the political organizations 
contains within it the nearsightedness necessary 
for a strong, united association. 




POLITICAL CLUBS 



"Who is Johri Birch< 



and assorted short subjects." 




"My daddy is still better tliaii Hubert. 




107 





"Will you look at that." 



"I vote for an open bar" 



FRATERNITIES 



Alpha Seniors — 1965. 




"Do I look that old?" 




108 



"To the tables down at George's 



Alpha Kappa Psi and Delta Sigma Pi, rival 
business fraternities on campus, are open to all 
students of CBA and economics majors in A&S. 
This year's annual fall battle for pledges was fierce, 
but each frat managed to obtain its share of new 
"brothers". The pledges went through "hell" for 
six weeks, as Vincent Giffuni, Master of Ritual in 
Alpha, and Robert Perrotti and Don Moran of 
Delta, joined by their fellow brothers, cracked the 
whip over them. At the end of the six weeks, the 
new brothers were selected and initiated. Both frats 
celebrated this event wdth formal dinner-dances on 
December 5. 

The fraternities are dedicated to establishing a 
liaison between the brothers and the professional 
business world, in an efFort to prepare themselves 
for graduate business study and an eventual career 
in the business world. Presidents David Wilson of 
Delta and David Falwell of Alpha both prepared 
an excellent series of lectures and conferences this 
year, designed to explore business opportunities and 
methods. Besides the academic and practical bene- 
fits, both frats offered their brothers countless social 
enjoyments and an abiding friendship that will 
continue to aid them in their post-college years. The 
fraternities are an honor to the school, and a special 
honor to those lucky enough to have been brothers. 




"Almost as good as Table Talk" 




The Delta Lounge 




A 







Big Brother sees all. 



Affiliated with Kiwanis International, Circle K 
offers the same type of self-less service which 
has made its parent organization famous the world 
over. Aimed primarily at the College of Business 
Administration, the Circle K organized the Fresh- 
man Parent's Weekend, supervised all class elec- 
tions, and ushered at the many meetings and 
conventions sponsored by the Business College. 
Certainly, Steve Vercollone and his tireless workers 
have earned our respect and praise. 

In addition to being the campus' largest-selling 
insurance agent. Council 5278 of the Knights of 
Columbus is perhaps the single most popular ac- 
tivity among Boston College undergraduates. This 
year the 487 paid membership was offered not only 
many pleasant evenings of social contact with their 
fellow knights, but the challenge to fulfill the com- 
mon Christian commitment in their own private 
lives as well. Grand Knight Matthew Soldano also 
guided this potentially powerful group in the Uni- 
versity' Blood Drive and in various services at the 
Catholic Guidance Center. 

Kappa Pi was founded in 1959 to bridge, what 
seemed at the time, an acute lack of communica- 
tion between the administration and the student 
body. Student-faculty relations have since improved 
to the point that both sides meet periodically to 
discuss questions which arise in the course of 
the school year. In addition, the group offers 
many social activities typical of such fraternal 
organizations. 




"Why do they make lecterns so high?" 




Smoke Dutch Masters 







"Masonknight?" 



Knight for a day 





"Another mixer?" 



Ill 



"But do we have to knit them?" 



"Well, 


we 


have 


to 


get 


uniforms." 




k 








\ 





"We could wear blc 





"Hmm, her in bloomers?" 



112 



W.R.A. / WVBC 

The Women's Recreation Association is the largest 
female organization on campus, sponsoring all recreational 
and athletic activities for women undergraduates. Rita 
Mac Neil, president of the Executive Board, coordinated 
the functions of the four hundred members and sponsored 
a wide variety of activities for the benefit of B.C. women, 
ranging from bridge parties and socials, to a basketball, and 
even a rifle club. Under the guidance of Miss Theresa 
Powell, the Association instilled appreciation of physical 
fitness among the women, expanded their recreational op- 
portunities, and offered a university-wide society in which 
the girls could participate. 

The operators of WVBC, the campus radio station, 
were fortunate this year in receiving an allocation of 
desired equipment which made it possible for the station 
to join the recently formed University Broadcasting System. 
This new system provides a direct link between the six 
leading universities in Boston participating in the program 
and has made it possible for Boston College to expand its 
schedule to include an even greater variety of program- 
ing, designed to suit the likes of every student. The 
first test of the new University Broadcasting System was 
realized this past fall during the national elections. Boston 
College station personnel, working with other members 
of the system, produced programs which were heard in 
Boston and several other major cities. 

WVBC has tried to produce a well rounded program 
schedule. With programs this past year like the University 
Playhouse, conducted with well known faculty members, 
its live broadcasts of hockey and basketball games, and 
its regular musical programing, the station believes that 
it has met the tastes of all within its broadcasting range. 




"I haven't turned this knob in a while. 



Now, "I'm A Loser." 




"Friday night at eight." 




"On The Air." 




113 



A&S Senior Scholars 






UNIVERSITY SCHOLARS 





"Neither do I." 




"I do!" 



"l don't see why we can't let these girls join us. 



The highest academic recognition that a Boston 
College student may attain is appointment to one 
of the University's exclusive honor societies. Mem- 
bership requirements vary from group to group, 
but, to be sure, those who have gained this distinc- 
tion are of the highest caliber both in terms of 
intellectual achievement and service to the school. 

Toward the end of each academic year, several 
members of the Junior Class in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, who have demonstrated the 
highest level of academic ability, intellectual 
maturity, and scholarly achievement are appointed 
Scholars of the College. With the guidance of a 
tutor, these scholars are free to determine their 
own program of studies, attend classes at their own 
discretion, and undertake an honors thesis pre- 
sented to the University at graduation. 

Alpha Sigmu Nu, the national honor society of 
Jesuit colleges, is the only honor group which em- 
braces the entire campus. The three standards 
which form the basis for selection are "scholar- 
ship, loyalty, and service." Male students from the 
undergraduate colleges of Arts and Sciences, Busi- 
ness Administration, and Education who have 
shown these qualities are invited to join the society. 





The Alpha and Omega Honor Society 
of the School of Education was estabhshed 
in 1955. The purpose of the organization 
is to select scholar-teachers of the Junior 
class who have shown excellence in their 
academic achievement, character, and serv- 
ice to the University. 

Seniors in the School of Nursing who 
have achieved high scholastic standing and 
who have been most active in University 
activities are eligible for membership 
in the Siena Society. The Society is named 
in honor of St. Catherine of Siena, a saint 
known both for her intellectual prowess 
and her service to others. 



"Teach us.' 



"What do you want to learn?" 





"That frosting is bad for your teeth. 



happy birthday to you." 




"But we use Gleeni." 





"Top notch!" 



"Now hold your paper just Hke mine 




"She needs me.' 



118 




The Order of the Cross and Crown is 

the senior honor society in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and the first such society 
to be established at Boston College. Mem- 
bership is restricted to Dean's List students 
with a special emphasis on extracurricular 
activities. The Order sponsors the annual 
Jesus Sanroma piano concert. 

Beta Gamma Sigma is the only scholar- 
ship honor society recognized by the Ameri- 
can Association of Collegiate Schools of 
Business. Membership is limited to those 
who rank in the upper tenth of their gradu- 
ating class and are of good moral character. 
The Society runs the C.B.A. Freshman 
Tutorial Program and presents the Annual 
Outstanding Freshman Award. 



"Let's read this book. 




"let's not. 





"Let's watch television. 



119 




The Stylus, in its function as the student hterary 
magazine of Boston College, faces perhaps the most 
difficult task of any student publication on campus. 
Concerned mainly with fiction and poety, the Stylus 
must depend on the quality of the work submitted 
as well as the critical acumen of the editor. 

Frank Bergon is certainly the most talented 
writer-critic to have occupied the editorship in 
recent years. Scholar of the College and Rhodes 
Scholar Nominee, Mr. Bergon maintained the 
high standards of the Stylus both in his selection 
of material and in his own creativity. The Stylus 
was again recognized by the Saturday Reineiv as 
one of the best collegiate literary magazines, and 
Frank was honored by the Atlantic Monthly in its 
annual short story competition. 

But the Stylus is far from being a one man effort. 
All editors and contributors must be thanked for 
providing quality writing, successfully sustained and 
emphasized through distinctive illustration. 



STYLUS/HEIGHTS 



Frank Bergon, Editor 



PUBLICATIONS 



Stylus Staff 






"Oops!" 



"And we have $1.20 printing budget for 6 weeks. 



"They fired who?" 





"Hold out your hand, Ted." 





"Dear Cece? Claude? Judy?" 



The Heights is a student newspaper. Sometimes it is 
most difficult to convince the student body of this fact; 
but the editors never tire in their attempt. 

During the past year the Heights lost a great moder- 
ator and a great man in the person of Fr. John Long, 
S.J. His death in August, 1964 meant the loss of a 
friend. The hair-shirt of the moderator has been 
donned by Fr. Robert Cheney, S.J. who stands by to 
advise and occasionally minister to the harried people 
who run around McElroy 102 on Tuesday nights and 
Wednesday mornings. If there are no pressing issues, 
they must be created — a challenging task at 2 : 00 a.m. 

The Heights is a tradition which has always reigned 
and always will. There are those Tuesday nights when 
it seems to be up against a wall, a faculty member, 
or even a menu. Somehow cooler heads prevail and 
the students have something "good" to digest on Friday 
afternoons. By that time the editors have spent three 
wonderful days at the Hi Hat getting up enough 
courage to start all over again. 



Some student's talents go beyond the ordinary. 



"Two sports." 






122 




"That's a nice piece of copy you got there. 

i 





"Boy, I sure hope he calls . . . calls . . . zzzz." 



"Dear Fr. Hinchey, . 




Jim Hartnett, Editor 




Late last March, the editors of the 1964 Sub Turri 
grouped behind closed doors. When they emerged, the 
yearbook witnessed the most fantastic reorganization with- 
in memory. For the first time in a century the powers 
that would reign for the coming year had all served three 
years apprenticeship on the staff. The 1964 editors selected 
as Editor-in-Chief, James Hartnett, a stupid but rather 
handsome lad and Eugene Donahue, CBA's best, became 
Business Manager. 

Immediately, these two went into action selecting 
another unknown, Douglas Mitchell, who, through his 
own brilliance and effervescence, won the publishing con- 
tract for his firm. The business matters taken care of, it 
was time to select the remainder of the staff. William 
Paine, who proved to be exactly that, was selected over 
Easter vacation as Graduate Editor and things began to 
roll. At the end of Easter vacation the remainder of the 
staff was chosen in the most ascetic of traditions. 

Not content with the writers on campus, the copy 
Editor, Herr Dennis Williams, was imported from 
Germany, but it was soon discovered that his taste was all 
for the wurst. His associate, Terry Ryan was just as fond 
of the wurst. Doug LaBrecque, our Layout Editor, generally 
succeeded in fouling up everything. This was due to his 
inability to grasp the fact that we were creating a yearbook 
and not a mosaic. His assistant. Rick Lareau, just couldn't 
grasp anything. 



SUB TURRI 



Gene Donahue, Business Manager 





1 

i 

3^ 







Rev. John P. McNamara, S.J., Moderator 










126 






A December 1 1 deadline was preceded by a party at 
a nearby apartment. Jim Manning, the Features Editor, 
managed to give the feature performance of the evening 
by pulling a banister from the stairs and handing it to Tom 
"Sloe Gin" Cote who proceeded to carry the whole thing 
around the house. It was also at this same party that 
Photography Editor Jack Lambert slid head-first down the 
stairs on his tummy (a number of times). 

But deadlines were met and things progressed. JefF 
Somers, in a last minute blizzard of activity, beat Asso- 
ciate Editor Don Kelly into submission, and the Activities 
section went to press. Meanwhile, Bob O'Hare, the sober 
member of the Academic section, handed in his final copy, 
and Neal Hunt combined his efForts with those of Mr. 
Manning (who was given one more chance) and produced 
the Features section. Sports Editors, Irv Goss and Bob 
Gilvey handed in used material from the Heights. Under- 
class Editor Mike LaFontaine and his assistant Patti Podd 
collaborated to make their section something more than 
under-class. 

April approached and Jim Mahoney identified every 
senior in the book (we hope!) The book went to press 
and you see the final product before you. We hope we 
have succeeded in reducing some of the above chaos into 
a semblance of order. 

Then there was the break-up banquet and . . . 






127 



< 



U 



a 



The spirit of Boston College is an elusive concept, almost indefin- 
able. Nuances in meaning are constantly evolving because the under- 
class must perenially re-define its own identity as the autumn season 
brings new faces and new personalities. From the far reaches of America 
and abroad they have come to Chestnut Hill to join the common quest 
for self -education. Though many, they are one. And the vital fiber that 
binds them into a conscious community is their "spirit" — their common 
allegiance to Boston College. That is why this University is fortunate 
in having an undergraduate such as Lorraine Zailskas. 

Lorraine's own enthusiasm and leadership as a cheerleader accounts 
in great measure for the notable resurgence of underclass spirit here 
at the Heights. The energetic and spontaneous response of our under- 
graduates at athletic events has enkindled a new feeling of loyalty to 
the University and our athletic teams. Lorraine helped spark that flame. 
But her spirit has flickered in more subtle corners as well. As a junior 
biology student in the School of Education, Lorraine has spent many 
hours in the classrooyn and in the laboratory. She is a spirited, deter- 
mined student, even as she is an enthusiastic rooter. This too is part of 
her sense of belonging, as it is ours. 

Lorraine's affinity to Boston College takes on special significance 
because she did not come here until her sophomore year. Yet her lively 
personality and sincere interest in others has given her a respected posi- 
tion in our midst. After all, this is what we mean by "spirit"; it is an ex- 
traordinary display of interest in our school, in our studies, and in our 
fellow students. Lorraine has captured them all. 



128 




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128 




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"Fourth floor — Philosophy, Theology, and Occult Sciences. " 




Reverie 




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%: 



Enfolded within every university 
is a large, ill-defined, and incon- 
gruous body, known sometimes affec- 
tionately, and sometimes not, as the 
Underclass. We are many, and we 
ask many questions; but without us, 
the spirit is gone and the traditions, 
unquestioned, lose their vigor. There 
is a hope and a determination and 
even a little awe that comes with 
being an underclassman. But we 
have come to appreciate what we 
have, perhaps more profoundly be- 
cause of its newness; and with the 
ebb and flow of this appreciation, 
this pride, comes successively new 
and deeper meaning to underclass 
life on this university campus. 





"But mother demands that I have a single room." 



Daily dash for lunch. 





"It is not." "Yes it is. 



With this edition the Sub Turri 
has brought foith a yearbook solely 
for the underclassmen of the 
university. 

Too often the Underclass repre- 
sents little that is significant on a 
university campus. We are fre- 
quently just there. But then, we 
have few opportunities to be con- 
scious of ourselves as a body or to 
reflect on ourselves as a very real and 
a very vital part of a maturing com- 
munity. This is why the underclass 
yearbook is so significant. This is 
what we are: our thoughts, our feel- 
ings, and our part in evolving the 
traditions of a great university. Be- 
fore our thoughts become only mem- 
ories, before the feelings pass, we 
can appreciate what is peculiarly our 
own, and in appreciating, we can 
impart a profound and lasting mean- 
ing on a very short and very elusive 
part of a lifetime. 




"Never get my bookin' done 



132 




Burning the oil 



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"There's a WHAT in every room? 




"You make it, we take it! 



"What do the> mean, who made me? 



134 




It is unfortunate that we can be- 
gin our life on campus only once. 
We forget so soon. We were so 
earnest and so unsure; so hopeful 
and so lost. There was a little won- 
der in every eye and a little awe in 
even the most confident. But the 
bewilderment faded quickly, and 
now it's all very dim and distant. 
That first rush of feeling is gone, 
replaced by a quiet and subtle mem- 
ory; then even memory fades away. 
But there was a time when it was 
all just beginning. 




"Forget about them — you don't play football. 




WMJb 



and do you agree to renounce all your worldly possessions? 



135 





^ 




Which twin has the Toni? 



136 



Learning takes many forms. If 
"the proper study of mankind is 
man," then we begin to learn early. 
Embracing a wide variety of behefs, 
traditions, and values, the interna- 
tional community among us has en- 
larged the scope of our understanding 
and enriched it with both the sym- 
pathy and the objective receptivity 
which characterize an education. 

They have brought many things 
with them: a broader outlook, a 
wider vision of the world, a deeper 
feeling for mankind as essentially 
one. But most important of all, they 
have given us a more profound ap- 
preciation of people — all people, 
all races. For this, above all, we are 
grateful. 



m 




I liree ehcurs tor torcitiii aid. 





Our "Open Door" polic)' 



A postcard home. 





'35(^? Wonder if they'll bargain?" 




"E-34? no. E-33? no. E-32 . . . ?" 





"Type? I can't even read." 





/l 9thtt ^ 




"So this Joe didn't tip last time 



"If it fits, I'll just walk out with it.' 



139 



A dormitor}' is home, though ma)'- 
be not much of a home. A dormi- 
tory is quiet, but only occasionally 
still. It is warm and dry and only a 
five minute run from that first Mon- 
day morning class. A roommate, sur- 
prisingly, can be considerate — es- 
pecially if he is threatened. Filled 
with trophies — begged, borrowed 
(usually borrowed) — this home 
away from home may not ^vin any 
awards, but there is nothing in the 
world quite like it. Obviously. 




One of the gang 





'Hello, Algonquin?" 





"Awe, you're pulling my leg!" 



"Remember the five bueks vou owe me?" 



4rJI "^-^Tl 




CBA seminar 



141 




"I wish the print were a little larger.' 




"Look at the nut with the camera. 




"No, but the umbrella makes me look collegiate." 





^ ¥ X 




142 





"The bottle was in here somewhere 



"You mean they're going to fofce us to date them?" 





". . . And mv dad owns six oil wells 



143 




Miss Pepsodent 1965 



"Help! IMv braces are stuck!" 





"This will keep my ears flat." 




"Panty Raid?" 



144 




Definitely farther away from the 
campus and smaller than their coun- 
terparts, dorms for the coeds still 
provide an atmosphere conducive to 
experiencing people. It is here that 
college friendships first begin, here 
that female-type people can be just 
what they are. Decorating rooms, 
borrowing clothes, trips to the drug- 
store, and telephone duty all charac- 
terize a coed's dorm life. No one is 
alone here; all activity and laughter 
are shared. From pranks to enlight- 
ening discussions — so the sharing 
goes. This is community-living with 
a touch of excitement. 




Scorch and water 




Friend, and friend. 



145 



The Underclass is people. The 
fellows aren't really so different after 
all, and the girl from Gushing makes 
leaving the one back home a little 
easier. McHugh and the Surf and 
a dozen other dance floors become 
almost as familiar as Bapst, and the 
music makes exams seem very far 
away. The crowds fade, and the 
faces begin to belong. These are the 
"old school ties", only they aren't so 
old yet. But we don't think about 
that now; there will be time later. 





My hero! 



"The evening was dehcious." 




146 



Poor odds 





\ night at the opera. 



And the band played on. 





"Who's next?" 



147 





For those who've never seen it before — Bapst. 



"They're all in Latin! 




■ -Tf-ii 'iii -U 


■"■■ 


.. i 




-■-... 


ir 







so the bad heretic saiil to the good inquisitor . 



148 




We are here primarily to learn. 
And we do, though sometimes we 
are not certain just what an edu- 
cation really is. Ideas grow; the 
thoughts of men replace their names, 
and we learn not just to think about 
them, but to think with them. Their 
reflection becomes more and more 
our own perception; and we begin 
to understand that when it becomes 
personal, it becomes an education. 




You're getting drowsy 




"Will he ever say hello?" 



149 




The traditions were here long be- 
fore we were, but the same campus 
slowly becomes ours. The towers, 
the trees, and the long hours at the 
long tables begin to mean something. 
We assimilate the present and bear 
the future. In the give and take of 
university life, we have received 
much; and in return we have offered 
something of ourselves: our hopes, 
our ideas. We have accepted the 
university, and now it acknowledges 
us. The traditions are ours, and what 
is ours to give will in its turn be- 
come tradition. 



"But that was For Boston." 




1 




'*'*"'• iWMWU 



French on the rocks. 



150 





-~ "^^^''^ ^gf^^--* ^ 



Dog Days 



"Now girls 





Philosophy is so soothing 



151 




Broad jump 




SWK 
SlTffAC USE 

mm 



Blowin' in the wind. 




152 



"Catch her — Thanksgiving's next week! 



There's a level of tradition that 
lies dormant, waiting to be stirred by 
the sounds of people, a brass band, 
and a rally. "For Boston . . ." rings, 
and pride, deep and abiding, wells- 
up irrepressibly. Margo stirs almost 
impassively. The air is filled with 
sound and spirit; and voices press 
one against the other, spilling our 
feelings over into Cleveland Circle, 
carrying people and traffic in the 
midst of the confusion, and then 
pouring over into the next day's 
game. There are no class lines 
drawn here: freshmen, sophomores, 
and juniors alike are swept along in 
the rush of feeling, until everyone is 
equal in the roar. 



^wimmi^i-stsit 


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HI 


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Now, the Alma Mater 



Obv 




153 









On the move. 



"Who's overdressed? 




There are few passive spectators 
among us when the team is on the 
field. A spontaneous surge of excite- 
ment Hvens the air. And the stands 
react. Maybe the team can't hear 
us. But we yell anyway and call the 
next play. There's a response, a ten- 
sion every time the ball is snapped, a 
feeling that sweeps through the 
stands and carries us with it. This is 
our team and our game, and some- 
how being a part of Boston College 
seems especially important on a fall 
Saturday afternoon. 



154 



'We did!!' 






Touchdnw n! 



"What do you mean, he ate Margo?" 





Clearing by game-time. 



155 







'Hofbrau at 8:00? 





"But back home in New York . . ." 



"I thought this was a dry campus. 



Banner year at B.C. 




156 





"I'm your friend, remember?" 



1000 Bulova wearers can't be wrong. 






If the Underclass is people, the 
home of the Underclass is the 
"Eagle's Nest." There is often more 
said over a cup of coffee than we 
could have ever thought to say in 
that last blue-book. But then, here 
the tension is gone. We relax, and 
for a few minutes at least, the people 
are all that count. In the corner a 
smile flashes, or the next table emits 
a laugh soon jostled and lost in the 
life of the room. Whether it is a 
gathering of old friends or a mid- 
afternoon date with a very special 
new friend, this is the place. The 
"oF meeting house . . ." 



"SHE'S reader of the week?" 



158 






Still one of the gang. 





"Honestly now, Mr. Androski . . ." 



Caf rats 



159 




The big push 




20-0 



160 




We have much to give to the Uni- 
versity, for her tradition of excel- 
lence must be maintained. But 
excellence begins early — as early 
as spring practice, as soon as fresh- 
man teams can be formed. It's a 
great deal of work and little glory. 
But whether it's a well-executed fast 
break, the sharp flash of skates over 
a frigid stretch of ice, or the last few 
grueling yards of a long mile run, 
we aim for excellence early. Tradi- 
tion asks much; a tradition of excel- 
lence is a demanding tradition. But 
then, it's the one which we have 
chosen. 



Open shot; let's hope it's our basket. 





^^I^Jf 





"Anathema what? 




"Yeah, I guess I do have a drinking problem." 








162 



March to the Tarn. Bffi^, 

mi' 





"Duck — I cut him today.' 





"Remember, I'M not a grapefruit! 



163 



ssies^M 



Mm Mm 

IW n 






'Hey, Poopsie! 



164 





"I dreamt I hit a home-run in my Weejuns." 




Our lives become fuller, more di- 
verse. One moment we are lost in 
the eighteenth century in the stacks 
of Bapst, and the next we are sweep- 
ing an end in the warm sunshine of 
a Saturday afternoon. We grow in 
these years; there is more to do now, 
more we want to do. We are ahve 
with an understanding of who we 
are and why we are here; we almost 
wonder if it wasn't always like this. 
Somewhere, somewhere in the past, 
we know it was not. We were new 
once, and we will pass like the 
classes before us. But now we belong. 




Alone, with a friend. 



'Psst. The one next to you is a real dog." 





Getting plowed the cheap way. 



165 





Most tradition is quiet, subtle, 
yet pervading. The atmosphere of 
reverence on the Boston College 
campus is just such a tradition. Its 
direction is a personal one, seeing 
within each individual a sphere of 
religious experience with an infinite 
potential for embodying the Chris- 
tian commitment. 

Ours is a considered Christianity, 
a thoughtful and reflective faith. 
Reverence, the manifestation of this 
faith, is very much a part of our 
lives. We intend that it should al- 
ways be. 






167 




The clan 





Capper 



The Queen and her court 






Capping 









k^k^i^^^ >K'h'Pi 



'■** '^' vi:. 



^ 



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y 






Each school within the university 
has its unique store of memorable 
Capggs experiences and unforgetable activi- 

ties. Just such an activity are the 
Basic Nursing Skits, short comedies 
satirically representing to the newer 
members of the school the life of a 
nursing coed. For fledgling nurses 
they are an enjoyable introduction to 
university life; and for upperclass- 
men they offer an opportunity to ex- 
tend a welcome to their younger 
sisters. 

In a more serious light is the 
Sophomore Nursing Convocation. A 
lifetime of service to the sick and 
helpless is begun symbolically with 
the procession of candles, the kissing 
of the Cardinal's ring, and the 
nurse's prayer to the Blessed Mother. 
In these moments this dedication is 
confirmed, and the memories of a 
hfetime find their beginning. 



169 




Pure Velvet 



The evening begins warm and 
quiet in the spring. Then people, 
college people, add the excitement of 
young society. The plans have been 
executed, the work is over; now is 
the time to enjoy the Prom. Early 
evening parties swathe people in the 
spirit of things. Then it's off to the 
ballroom for dancing with that spe- 
cial date. The hall may be warm and 
the dance floor crowded, but these 
things are hardly noticed when the 
fun is real. Saturday, the spirit still 
lingers, and it's off" to the beach for 
another party. 



Ouiet corner 



170 





Mood-music and memories 



Letting your hair down . . . plus. 




171 




and his name shall be engraved forever . 




A word in edgewise. 



Sometimes when the trees are 
brushed by a fresh breeze or an eve- 
ning snowfall has left a white and 
quiet path behind it, a stillness and 
peace settle over the campus. We 
walk beneath the trees, beside the 
towers, and these months and years 
gather around themselves a new and 
very special meaning. They become 
peculiarly ours. With the many years 
past and the many yet to come, these 
moments still have a meaning all 
their own, for we haven't begun to 
remember them. We are living them. 

And we are sharing them. 



'But I have six frat pins already." 







175 



t/> 



O 



Kn 



On Septemher 19, 1964, Left End Bill Cronin made sports history 
at Boston College. It was opening day for the season at Alumni Stadium, 
and the red-head from Reading was captaining the football Eagles against 
nationally ranked Syracuse University. 

Coach ]im Miller stressed defense during most of the game, hut 
the Orangemen were still able to score before the end of the first half. 
In the third quarter the Eagle offense abandoned its conservative style, 
and taking advantage of its own versatile attack, shocked Syracuse with 
two well executed touchdown drives. 

But the Orangemen weren't down yet. Late in the fourth quarter 
they evened the score on a touchdown and a breathtaking two point 
conversion. Then, with less than a minute to play, B. C. moved the 
ball on the ground for three consecutive plays, seemingly to settle 
for the tie. However, on fourth down. Bill Cronin made the greatest 
clutch play in memory. Leaping high into the air to catch a wobbly des- 
peration pass, the powerfid end shook off two surprised defenders and 
scampered into the end zone. 

Syracuse coach Ben Schwartzw alder was understandably dismayed 
but managed a few laudatory comments. "B. C. deserved to win," he 
said, "Bill Cronin s catch and breakaway was something that happened 
about once in a hundred times, but he made the play." And in football 
there is no greater praise for any player. 

But Bill's success hardly stopped there. His outstanding perform- 
ances during the rest of the season gained him invitations to the Senior 
Bowl, and the North-South All-Star Game where he caught the win- 
ning touchdown pass. Next season Bill will be playing with the Philadel- 
phia Eagles, and we might well expect to see many more exciting "clutch 
catches," Cronin-style . 



176 




Kn 



O 



K/> 



.If 

But the Orangemen v 
they evened the score on c t 
conversion. Then, with Ic'' f^ 
hall on the ground foi 
for the tie. Hou 
clutch 
perati 
scamp 




sports history 

i Stadium, 

'gZes against 




most of thAgame, hut 

end '^Ijj^-fi'^st half. 

cdSS^whtive style, 

%chcd S\ r.acuse with 

i 

1 

/' i-hc foiifth quarter 

uthudiUi^ two point 

, .^J^' ^. moved the 

1 ^ seenfingh' to settle 

iQjiin^i/idS^^^ S.reatest 

g high nnn \t,e ivff i( •h'h (t". 

d shook of] luo '^itipiL^t 



hut manciiii.i •' ft 
said, Bill ('•rmi'7: 
about once in ' 
there is no gn 

But Bill's sue 
ances during the rcsr oj tf^ 
Bowl, and the ISlorth South 
ning touchdown pass. Next s^ 
phia Eagles, and we might welf 
catches," Cronin-style. 



hzwalde 

pmmojf^ 

\eakaw. 





"rjorm- 

; i.ne Senior 

Jit the rvin- 

he Philadel- 

foj0fm' u-''^ m^vc exciting "clutch 



176 




^f 



Ci^^fTr" 



m'i 



M 




1964-65 Varsity Football Record 



FOOTBALL 



B.C. 


21 


B.C. 


13 


B.C. 


14 


B.C. 


10 


B.C. 


13 


B.C. 


8 


B.C. 


6 


B.C. 


17 


B.C. 


10 



Syracuse 


14 


Army 


20 


Tennessee 


16 


Cincinnati 





Air Force 


7 


Villanova 


7 


Miami 


30 


Detroit 


9 


Holy Cross 


8 



178 






Cautious optimism might describe the attitude of B.C. 
followers as the 1964 season began. The loss of Jack 
Concannon had taken a large chunk out of the B.C. 
offense, but the team had greater depth in the line and 
backfield than ever before. The schedule was the toughest 
in four years, and B.C. was out to win the big ones, 
starting with Syracuse. 

On September 26 in the first game of the '64 season, 
the fairy tale finish came to the Boston College Heights 
as Captain Bill Cronin scored on a 55 yard pass from 
quarterback Larry Marzetti to give the Eagles an un- 
behevable 21-14 win over eastern and national power, 
Syracuse. With twelve seconds left, the senior end 



leaped to grab the aerial on the 25, shook off two de- 
fenders, and raced happily into the end zone. 

As coach Jim Miller was quick to point out, it was the 
defensive line, anchored by John Frenchette and Emil 
"Spike" Khner that proved to be the big factor as the 
forward wall made the key plays that stopped Syracuse 
marches. 

With the score knotted at 14-14 in the last period, the 
Eagles sent Don Moran off tackle twice, seemingly settling 
for a tie. But then Marzetti threw the bomb, a long, 
wobbly pass. Cronin now made his moves, snagged the 
ball from the hands of the Orange defensemen, and gave 
Jim Miller his third straight home opener win. 



179 





180 




On the following Saturday, a strong Army team 
held-off a late B.C. surge to dump the Maroon and 
Gold to the tune of 19-13. After traihng 19-0 in the 
fourth quarter, the courageous Eagles, under the 
guidance of quarterback Eddie Foley, amazed the 
crowd of 27,200 by roaring back with 13 points. But 
the hope of another last-minute miracle was killed on 
the Army 40 yard line — the clock said no, and now 
B.C. was "one and one" on the season. 

One more disappointing Saturday was to haunt 
Jim Miller before the Eagles started flying again, and 
this one came at the hands of the Vols of Tennessee 
University. The rugged Southlanders defeated B.C. 
16-14, while the Heightsmen outran, outpassed, but 
underscored the opportunistic Tennessee squad. 

Although the first half was all B.C.'s, the Vols were 
an entirely different team in the second half as they 
scored twice and held the penalty-ridden Eagles to 
a single T.D. 

With the score at 16-7 in favor of the Vols, a 
34 yard pass from Foley to Cronin for a score made 
it look like a possible rainbow for the Beantown squad, 
but with only 2:35 left in the game, Tennessee stalled 
a B.C. drive and ran out the clock. 




181 





Jim Miller's squad got back on the right side of the 
fence on October 1 7 when the Eagles defeated a previously 
unbeaten Cincinnati, 10-0 at Alumni Stadium. In a con- 
test that resembled a swimming meet more than a football 
game, a 13-yard field goal by soph Gordie Kutz and Bob 
Shann's touchdown run were all the offense the Eagles 
were a"ble to muster in recording their second win against 
the same number of losses. 

Boston College won the opening toss and elected to kick 
to the visitors. Starting at their own 4 1 , the Bearcats moved 
deep into Eagle territory before a fumble by Brig Owens 
(the first of seven by the Bearcats) was recovered by Al 
Nelson, short of a first down at the B.C. 9. The Eagle 
drive stalled at the Cincy 13, from where sophomore end 
Gordon Kutz kicked the field goal that put the Eagles 
ahead to stay. 

In the second period, after Steve MuiTay punted to the 
Cincy 1 1 , Bill Cronin recovered a fumble by Errol Prisly 
at the Cincinnati 15. Six plays later Bob Shann went over 
for the score from the one and Kutz's kick gave the Eagles 
a 10-0 advantage. Then the mud and rain took over. 



182 






183 





: 4~^*f 




Led by a determined group of seniors, the B.C. 
Eagles outfought the Air Force on the following 
Saturday for a 13-7 victory, and for the first time 
in the season the Eagles exhibited a genuine bal- 
anced attack. 

Don Moran and Bob Shann slashed through the 
Falcon's line consistently for good chunks of yard- 
age. Moran had 47 yards in ten carries and was 
also outstanding as a blocker. Halfback Shann ex- 
celled both ways — on offense he had 42 yards 
in thirteen carries, while on defense he pilfered 
his second aerial of the year. It was his finest all 
around performance of the season and rightly 
earned him the "back of the game" award. 

The Falcons received the opening kickoff, but 
neither team could score in the first period. In the 
second period, however. Air Force quarterback 
Tim Murphy passed 53 yards to end Fritz Greenlee 
for the Falcons' only score of the afternoon. 

B.C. came right back to even the count. Shann 
intercepted a Murphy pass and returned it to the 
Air Force 28. Six plays later he plunged. over 
from the three, while Gordie Kutz's toe made it 7 
all at halftime. 

Shann took the second half kickoff in his end- 
zone and brought it back to the 35. Ten plays later 
Eddie Foley flung a 28 yarder into the hands of 
Jim Whalen for the winning score. 



184 






185 





186 





On November 7 in Philadelphia it was another one 
of those thrilling finishes for the Eagles as they knocked 
Villanova from the ranks of the unbeaten by an 8-7 count. 
After trailing 7-0 throughout most of the game, B.C. 
capitalized on a blocked punt by Don Moran and went 
in for the score with only two minutes remaining. 

The Wildcats had controlled the ball most of the 
second half and were doing an excellent job of killing 
the clock until the blocked punt gave B.C. the ball on 
the 16 yard stripe. Three plays later versatile Jim Mc- 
Gowan took a pitch from quarterback Ed Foley for a 
three yard TD around right end. Foley then took the 



same route around right end for the vital two points for 
victory. 

Defense dominated the play for both sides. Neither 
team could penetrate the other's middle and only limited 
success was found around the ends. B.C.'s superior pass- 
ing never developed as Foley was swamped most of the 
afternoon by the Cats' blitz, while his ends, Jim Whalen 
and Bill Cronin, were roaming free in the weak Villanova 
secondary. 

But it was the defense that keyed the final outcome as 
they stalled Villanova's final attempt at a drive on their 
own 16 and set up the Moran-led rush that did all the 
damage. 



187 




A vastly improved Miami Hurricane eleven stopped the 
Boston College Eagles in mid-flight, 30-6, the next time 
out before 32,000 fans in the Orange Bowl. 

The Eagles couldn't seem to get their offense moving 
as the Hurricane's hard charging forward wall nullified 
the running of the B.C. backfield and took advantage of 
every miscue the visiting unit committed. 

Miami jumped to a 2-0 lead in the first quarter as a 
high snap from center got past punter Steve Murray in 
the end zone. They added a quick 14 more as Fred Cassidy 
piled over guard to score one touchdown and signal-caller, 
Bob Biletnickoff, scampered to pay dirt from one yard out 
for their second. 

B.C. came to life in the third period as they marched 56 
yards in eight plays for their lone score of the evening. A 
32 yard toss from Foley to Whalen and Foley's two yard 
slant into the end zone were the big plays in the scoring 
drive. But the combination of the heavy showers, hot, 
sticky weather, and the fierce play of the Hurricanes held 
back the visitors. 

Miami hit the scoreboard two more times to finish off 
the Eagles and end their win sti^eak at three. 






190 





After the Miami game the Eagles regrouped their 
forces to face a big Detroit team which coach Tracy 
Mehr had described as "another sleeping giant." 
For awhile it looked like someone had awakened 
the giant, as the Titans marched 60 yards with 
the opening kickoff, but finally had to settle for 
a 28 yard field goal and a 3-0 lead. B.C. got on the 
scoreboard halfway through the second period on 
the strength of Don Moran's running and Ed 
Foley's passing. Detroit came right back with a 
pass on a fake punt to lead at half time 9-7. The 
Eagles completely dominated the second half with 
Jim McGowan running like he didn't know he was 
a defensive specialist. Ed Foley continued his hot 
passing (9-14 for the game), and Marty DiMezza 
added a field goal to the Eagles' total. The final 
score was B.C. 17 - Detroit 9. Jim McGowan 
gained 141 yards in 13 carries, and Jim Whalen 
broke Art Graham's record for career pass re- 
ceiving. 






Last year the Crusaders of Holy Cross upset the 
Eagles in Worcester, 9-0. On the last game of the 
'64 season, the Eagles were out for revenge and 
got it, 10-8, to finish their rivalry with Dr. Eddie 
Anderson, and the season with a 6-3 record. 

For three quarters, though, it seemed that the 
Crusaders were to make it a "repeat", as the score 
read 8-3 in favor of the Cross with Marty Di- 
Mezza's 26-yard field goal being the only B.C. 
points on the scoreboard. Pete Meehan had put 
the Worcesterites out in front with a two yard buck 
after the Cross had driven 86 yards in the first 
period. A safety made it 8-3. 



But in the third quarter the Eagles came alive. 
Eddie Foley took B.C. to the air, hitting Bob Shann 
with 13 and 18 yard passes. On the same kind of 
pattern which found both ends split and the half- 
backs shooting down and across the middle, Jim 
Whalen took a Foley pass on the two and side- 
stepped into the end zone for the winning touch- 
down. 

In the last quarter. Holy Cross tried desperately 
to get back into the ball game on Mike Currion's 
passing, but the hard rushing of Jim Chevillot, 
Dick Powers, Bill Cronin, and Jim Whalen made 
him fumble the ball into B.C.'s hands for keeps. 



192 




? P4 5?^l,«D! 7^i^.P0oi^^..9, 44 ?7j fl2 53, ,51 



^3. .50, 




First row: Bill Murphy, Sal Armenio, John Walsh, Ed Butler, Jim McGowan, Gary Testa, Emil Kleiner, Frank Grywalski, Bill 
Cronui (Capt.), John Frechette, Steve Murray, Don Moran, Bob Shann, Jim Whalen, John Yauckoes, Frank DeFelice. Second 
Row: Coach Jim Miller, Ron Gentili, Bob Ryan, Dick Taylor, Dick Hurley, Bob Budzinski, Larry Marzetti, Ed Duggen, Dick 
Cremin, Bill Schoeck, Andy Kenney, Jack Daly, Dick Lee, Nick Franco, John Leone, Marty DiMezza, Coach Tracy Mehr. 
Third Roiv: Coach George Clemens, Coach John McCauley, Bob Cunningham, Art Ferrance, Bob Doherty, John Blair, Gordon 
Kutz, George McCabe, Dave Reardon, Dick Povi'ers, Dave Shores, Dick Bradley, Fred Prifty, Ed Foley, Charlie Smith, Hank 
Blaha, Coach Emerson Dickie. Fourth Rou': Bob Hyland, Dan Hostetter, Brian Leahy, Bill Green, Tom Schneider, Harry Con- 
nors, Bill Stetz, Paul Gramling, Jim McLaughlin, Tom Bulgar, Mike Petruzziello, Coach John Miller. Fifth Roiv: Ed Lipson, 
Jack Williamson, Mike Violante, Gene Poccarro, Dennis Cullen, Bill Donovan, John Gurry, Tom Carlyon, Bert Dalkiewicz, 
Fred Warchol. Last Row: Coach Loyal Park, Bob Slattery, Pete O'Donnell, Tom Sarkisian, Dave Pesapane, Jim Chevillot, Dick 
Collins, Ed Manning, Dave Wenners, John Baichi, Jeff Riley, Chris Kitlowski, Bob Pisinski, Bob Del Signore, Mike O'Neil, 
Al Tompson, John Lawrence, Paul Yelle. 




193 



HOCKEY 




On March 20, 1965, the Boston College 
hockey squad reached for the Heights and 
almost made it, as the Eagles finished sec- 
ond in the nation in the NCAA competition 
for their best finish since 1949 when that 
year's team won the national crown. Lead- 
ing the Eagles to their 24-7 slate were AU- 
American John Cunniff, All-ECAC Phil 
Dyer, Jim Mullen, Ralph Toran, Woody 
Johnson, and goalie Pat Murphy. These 
skaters led the determined pack of Eagles 
through a 19-3 start, out of a three game 
losing streak, and on to five straight victories 
over Colby, Dartmouth, Clarkson, Brown, 
and North Dakota, into the NCAA finals at 
Providence where they bowed to National 
Champions Michigan Tech to the tune of 
8-2. This final loss, however, did little to 
dim the success of the 1964-65 season, as 
John "Snooks" Kelly continued his reign as 
the winningest coach in collegiate hockey 
circles. 




.<*'%#''«'•. ^'■■■•■i 




194 





195 




The Eagles boasted the most powerful 
offensive attack in the nation with the front 
line of Cunniff, Dyer, and Mullen pacing 
the 6.0 goals per game average of the B.C. 
squad. Cunniff, who will be around next 
season for another year of competition, led 
the nation's collegiate hockey players with 
31 goals and 36 assists, for a total of 67 
points. This first line, also best in the nation, 
averaged a fantastic five points a game. The 
second line of Dick Fuller, Pete Flaherty, 
and John Moylan accounted for more than 
their share of goals, while the all sophomore 
line of Bob Kupka, Jerry York, and Fred 
Kinsman surely indicated a bright future 
for the Eagles . . . 




196 






197 





198 



Captain Eddie Downes suflFering from a 
shoulder separation, and E. J. Breen, laid 
up with a recurring knee injury, missed a 
good part of the season, but returned in 
time for the playoffs to add spark to the 
offense and the spirit of the team. 

The defense, although suffering from 
momentary lapses, was instrumental in the 
Eagle's return to national prominence. 
Ralph Toran and Fran Kearns led the blue- 
liners and were backed up effectively by 
Allan Keirstead, Woody Johnson, and Art 
Byrne. Toran was the outstanding defen- 
sive man in eastern college hockey as he 
was named to the ECAC All Tournament 
first team and grabbed a second slot in the 
Nationals . . . 





199 




when an injury sidelined Johnson, Jack-of- 
all-trades Byrne filled in to help the Eagles 
maintain their momentum. But behind the 
fine shield of these defensive men was the 
man in the nets — Pat Murphy. Pat, who 
has gained the reputation as the most un- 
orthodox goalie to guard the nets around 
McHugh Forum in years, led the Eagles in 
the ECAC Tournament while estabhshing 
a tournament record for the least number 
of goals allowed in three games. Pat was the 
Most Valuable Player in the ECAC and 
was named to the second team in the 
NCAA Championships. Fred Flavin began 
the season for B.C. and supplied good back- 
up support for Murphy. 




200 






201 




The B.C. Eagles began their season with 
a romp over Yale and from that point on 
they were always in the spotlight as the 
best team in the east and one of the best in 
the nation. When the final ECAC rankings 
were published, the Eagles found them- 
selves in second place behind Boston Uni- 
versity whom they had already beaten in 
two out of three contests. But the Terriers 
had one less loss, so the adding machine 
gave BU the numerical advantage. Not to 
be outdone for long, however, the Eagles 
wound up on top again after BU was 
drowned in the second round of the eastern 
college tourney. 




202 



'■"Kiiw^ *****' 



>-.g 



\ 




203 




w 1 i>«! iW| i ii'iW( iii « i WMi i i#u.<(w 





<Wirwiimiiwi»iiiiHili 



'**''**i'*MHMMlMHlM(W». 





With two tournament victories, the 
ECAC and the Beanpot, and a second place 
in the Nationals, it was always experience 
and desire that counted the most. Much of 
the credit in this department must go to 
the graduating seniors, especially to Breen 
and Downes, who many times played out- 
standing games with but a few days train- 
ing after injuries. Breen, one of the fastest 
men on the McHugh ice, accounted for 
eight goals and five assists during the season, 
while Downes, who played only eight games 
during the season, still managed 10 points 
despite his serious shoulder separation. 

As in twenty-eight previous seasons, the 
mastermind behind the Eagle's successful 
season was "Snooks" Kelly, the Dean of 
American College Hockey. The flashiest 
Eagle of them all molded one of the best 
all-time Boston College hockey squads, al- 
though this was supposed to be merely a 
building year, and continues to be Mr. 
Hockey on the Heights. Having finished 
the second most successful season in B.C. 
hockey annals, "Snooks" once again can lay 
claim to the title of the east's best collegiate 
hockey coach. 




205 




Dean of American College Hockey: 
John "Snooks" Kelly 







206 




First Row, Left to Right: Fred Flavin, E. J. Breen, Pete Flaherty, Captain Eddie Downes, Fran Kearns, Ralph Toran, Pat Murphy. 
Second Row: Coach "Snooks" Kelley, John Cunniff, Allan Kierstead, Bob Cornish, Jim Mullen, John Moylan, Phil Dyer, David Schilpp, 
Manager. Third Row: Jack Tighe, Equipment Manager, Jerry York, Dick Fuller, Art Byrne, Woody Johnson, Fred Kinsman, Bob Kupka. 



1964-65 HOCKEY STATISTICS 



Record: Overall — Won 24, 


Lost 7 


Pet 


.774 Eastern - 


-Won 


20, 


Lost 


5 Pet. 


800 




B.C. 6 Yale 




2 


B.C. 


4 


Northeastern 


5§ 




B.C. 


5 


Boston University* 


4 


B.C. 6 Providence 




1 


B.C. 


5 


Boston University 


4§ 




B.C. 


8 


Providence 




4 


B.C. 2 Brown 




7 


B.C. 


3 


Harvard 


2§ 




B.C. 


4 


Boston Uni\ 


ersity 


5 


B.C. 6 Colby 




5 


B.C. 


5 


Brown 


3" 




B.C. 


3 


Clarkson 




5 


B.C. 5 St. Lawrence 




3 


B.C. 


11 


Princeton 


4 




B.C. 


5 


Cornell 




6 


B.C. 5 R. P. I. 




1 


B.C. 


7 


Colgate 


2 




B.C. 


12 


Colby 




1 


B.C. 4 Royal Mihtary 


2 


B.C. 


9 


Northeastern 


U 




B.C. 


5 


Dartmouth 




3t 


B.C. 13 McGill 




6 


B.C. 


9 


Dartmouth 


8§ 




B.C. 


3 


Clarkson 




2t 


B.C. 7 Colorado 




9 


B.C. 


5 


Harvard 


4§ 




B.C. 


6 


Brown 




2t 


B.C. 8 Loyola 




3 


B.C. 


6 


Army 


2 




B.C. 


4 


No. Dakota 




31 


- Beanpot Champions 


t - ECAC 


Champions I 


- NCAA Runner-up § - 


Overtime 


B.C. 


2 


Michigan Tech 


81 










INDIVIDUAL SCORING 
















NAME 


YEAR 




GP 




POS. 




GOALS 




ASSISTS 


POINTS 


John Cunniff 


Jr. 




31 




W 




31 






36 




67 


Phil Dyer 


Jr. 




31 




c 




12 






43 




55 


Jim Mullen 


Jr. 




31 




W 




23 






23 




46 


Dick Fuller 


So. 




31 




W 




21 






24 




45 


Pete Flaherty 


Sr. 




28 




c 




15 






29 




44 


John Moylan 


Jr. 




31 




w 




16 






26 




40 


Jerry York 


So. 




26 




c 




17 






13 




30 


Ralph Toran 


Sr. 




31 




D 




6 






12 




18 


Bob Kupka 


So. 




29 




w 




5 






11 




16 


E. J. Breen 


Sr. 




19 




w 




9 






5 




14 


Fred Kinsman 


So. 




22 




w 




5 






7 




12 


Woody Johnson 


So. 




28 




D 




7 






5 




12 


Ed Downes 


Sr. 




13 




W 




1 






10 




11 


Allan Keirstead 


Jr. 




26 




D 




5 






4 




9 


Fran Kearns 


Sr. 




30 




D 




2 






7 




9 


Art Byrne 


So. 




23 




D 




3 






5 




8 


Bob Cornish 


Jr. 




9 




W 




3 






1 




4 


Tom Connors 


So. 




2 




W 




1 











1 


Dick Leetch 


Jr. 




1 




w 




1 

183 







259 




1 
442 


XDALIE RECORDS 




























YEAR 




GP 




SHOTS 




SAVES 




GOALS 


G.A. 


AVE. 


Pat Murphy 


Jr. 




26 




889 




798 






91 




3.50 


Fred Flavin 


Jr. 




8 




132 




113 






19 




2.38 



207 



BASKETBALL 




208 



From the opening tapoff against Dart- 
mouth in early December to the closing 
buzzer against St. John's more than three 
months later, this was, for Boston College 
players and fans, a season of growth — a 
process of maturing in the game of basket- 
ball. Like any process of this kind it was 
sometimes bitter, sometimes sweet, always 
exciting, and in the end, successful. Com- 
ing off a rookie 10-11 season. Coach Bob 
Cousy had John Austin, a junior who had 
broken every B.C. individual and season 
scoring record last year, four good sopho- 
mores who would have to adjust to varsity 
ball, and a solid contingent of juniors and 
seniors of generally untested quality. When 
the season was over, B.C. had a record 
winning season (22-7), a record winning 
streak (14 games), and almost every record 
in the basketball book — points in a season 
(Austin), rebounds in a season (Wolters), 
rebounds in a game (Wolters), assists 
(Hockenbury), and perhaps most incredi- 
ble, points in a career (Austin, in just two 
years) — had been broken by what was 
clearly B.C.'s best basketball team ever . . . 





209 






210 





But it would be a mistake to assume that 
things just broke right and all the pieces 
and all the players fell into place for the 
Eagles. Nothing could be farther from the 
truth. The team that took the floor against 
Dartmouth in December was not the same 
team that crushed Holy Cross in their last 
regular season game — the same individ- 
uals maybe, but not the same team. And 
therein lies the story of basketball 1964-65 
at the Heights — the building of a team, 
the building of a spirit, the building of a 
tradition. 

John- Austin got B.C. off to a fast start 
as he scored 96 points in his first three 
games, setting a Madison Square Garden 
crowd on its ear and sending the New York 
sportswriters into ecstasy from his per- 
formance in the N.Y.U. game. However, 
UConn's Toby Kimball, the nation's lead- 
ing rebounder, combined with a sharp 
shooting sophomore named Wes Bialosuknia 
to bring the Eagles back to earth with an 
85-81 overtime \vin. 




211 




With a 5-1 record, B.C. packed its bags 
for a long — 15,000 thousand mile — 
seven game — road trip. In the Milwaukee 
Classic, John Austin hit a long shot at the 
buzzer to nip Wisconsin and put B.C. in 
the finals against the defending National 
Champions, UCLA. The UCLANS used 
their famous zone press to full advantage 
and broke up a close game with 19 straight 
points in the last two minutes of the first 
half. Austin, however, broke the game and 
tournament scoring records and was named 
to the All Tourney Team. Austin injured 
his wrist in the UCLA game and vidthout 
him B.C. had to settle for a split in Cali- 
fornia before heading for the Rainbow 
Classic in Hawaii. After losing a heart- 
breaker in a rematch with Wisconsin, B.C. 
won its last two games out west, the final, a 
120-1 18 overtime affair with Utah State . . . 





212 









213 




Austin poured in a season's high of 43 in 
this one, but the star and MVP of the 
Tourney was State's Wayne Estes who got 
52 against B.C. Two months later a deeply 
shocked B.C. team gathered in St. Joseph's 
Chapel to offer Mass for this great All- 
American whose tragic death had cut short 
a brilliant career, Because they had lived 
on the same floor, the B.C. players had 
come to know Estes rather well during the 
Tourney and it was not just a great basket- 
ball player, but a good friend they mourned 
that day. 

Two of the best coaches in the game, 
Providence's Joe Mullaney and St. Joseph's 
Jack Ramsey gave the Eagles a solid lesson 
in basketball as their teams romped to easy 
victories over the seemingly hapless Eagles. 
But something happened and these were 
the last defeasts of the Eagles in the regular 
season. For the next two months, through 
fourteen games, a Beanpot Championship, 
and two big ones against the once dominant 
Holy Cross Crusaders, B.C. played basket- 
ball like it had never been played before at 
the Heights . . . 







215 



Willie Wolters began to put all the parts 
together — defense, rebounding, and scor- 
ing; and when Willie was working the team 
was in orbit. Teddy Carter found the mark 
and helped the Eagles control the boards. 
Ed Hockenbury ran the team like a ma- 
chine, and Cousy freely used a potent 
bench (Bob Rossi, George Humann, John 
Ezell, Doug Hice, Jim Nelson, and Tom 
Kelley) to keep the machine well oiled. Bob 
Furbush established himself as a great de- 
fensive ballplayer and showed it against 
such stars as BU's Randy Cross and HC's 
John Wendelken. Wendelken was limited 
to ten shots and eleven points in the thirty 
minutes of the game that Furbush covered 
him. He threw in eighteen points after 
Furbush left. 

So in three months the B.C. fans saw a 
team come of age at the Heights. But what 
is just as important, the team, the coaches, 
and the hard core fanatics saw a sport 
come of age . . . 





Basketball had found a home at B.C. The 
myth that B.C. couldn't or wouldn't sup- 
port two winter sports was dead. The 
beauty of the crowd that filled Roberts for 
the Holy Cross game on March 4th was 
not so much that they just came, but that 
they reacted as people who love basketball 
have recated for years. This is how it should 
be, and this may be as important to the 
future of B.C. basketball as this year's unde- 
feated freshman team. 

A year of maturing, a year of growth, a 
year of hard work. To Coaches Cousy, 
Magee, and Power, a much deserved salute. 
To George Humann and the players who 
wouldn't quit until they became a team, a 
trophy for perseverance. And to the NIT 
and the people of New York, a word of 
warning, "WAIT TILL NEXT YEAR." 



216 




217 




Mr. Basketball: Bob Cousy 







218 







219 




Kneeling Left to Right: Bob Furbush, Head Coach Bob Cousy, Captain George Humann, Assistant Coach Jack Magee, John Austin, 
Standing: Bob Ward, Tom Kelly, Charlie Chaney, Ted Carter, Bob Rossi, Willie Wolters, Manager Bill OToole, John Ezell, Manny 
Papoula, Bill Dwyer, Jim Nelson, Doug Hice, Ed Hockenbury. 

1964-65 BASKETBALL STATISTICS 



220 





Record: Overall — 


Won 


22, 


, Lost 7 


Pet. .759 




NCAA — Won 21, 


Lost 7 


Pet. .' 


750 




B.C. 


104 


Dartmouth 


76 






B.C. 107 




Rhode Island 


105 


» _ 


Phillips 


66ers game 


not ini 


B.C. 
B.C. 


89 
102 


Georgetown 
N. Y. U. 


71 
84 






B.C. 89 
B.C. 96 




Colby 
Fairfield 


54 
88 




in NCAA statistics 




B.C. 


81 


U Conn 




85 


COT) 




B.C. 78 




Seton Hall 


73 










B.C. 


83 


Harvard 




72 






B.C. 109 




U Mass 


97 


+ 
+ 


Milwaukee Classic 




B.C. 


86 


Wisconsin + 


85 






B.C. 101 




Northeastern 


90 










B.C. 


93 


U.C.L.A. 


+ 
+ 


115 






B.C. 94 




Boston Univ. 


86 


t- 


N.I.T. 






B.C. 


78 


S. Mary's 




62 






B.C. 89 




Fordham 


78 








B.C. 


88 


L.A. State 


104 






B.C. 81 




Brandeis 


51 


§ — 


- Hawaii 


Invitational 




B.C. 


69 


Wisconsin § 


70 






B.C. 95 




Holy Cross 


94 


> 








B.C. 


120 


Hawaii § 




74 






B.C. 90 




Boston Univ.e 


85 










B.C. 


120 


Utah State § 


118 


COT) 




B.C. 104 




Phillips 66ers* 


88 


« — 


■ Beanpol 


t Tournament 


B.C. 


79 


Providence 


89 






B.C. 56 




Northeastern* 


51 










B.C. 


71 


St. Joseph's 


93 






B.C. Ill 




Holy Cross 


89 
























B.C. 92 




St. John'st 


114 
























INDIVIDUAL 


SCORING 












NAME 


YR. 


GP 


FGA 


FGM 


FG% 


FTA 


FTM 


FT% 


RB 


PF 


PTS 


AVE. 


John 


Austin 


Jr. 


25 




514 


235 


.457 


267 


211 


.790 


100 


57 


673 


26.9 


Ted 


Carter 


So. 


27 




334 


144 


.431 


73 


47 


.651 


179 


68 


337 


12.5 


Willie Wolters 


So. 


28 




240 


122 


.508 


157 


79 


.503 


354 


93 


323 


11.5 


Ed Hockenbury 


Jr. 


28 




213 


87 


.408 


96 


73 


.737 


121 


91 


247 


8.8 


Georj 


i,e Humann 


Sr. 


28 




181 


89 


.487 


52 


39 


.750 


95 


59 


219 


7.8 


Doug 


Hice 


So. 


26 




161 


78 


.489 


73 


46 


.630 


83 


64 


202 


7.8 


Bob Furbush 


Sr. 


28 




175 


82 


.469 


66 


39 


.591 


97 


79 


203 


7.3 


Bob Rossi 


So. 


10 




43 


26 


.605 


20 


12 


.600 


80 


61 


64 


6.4 


Jim ] 


Nelson 


Sr. 


21 




80 


38 


.475 


17 


12 


.706 


18 


18 


88 


4.2 


Tom 


Kelly 


Jr. 


13 




38 


14 


.361 


17 


12 


.706 


6 


6 


40 


3.1 


Bill Dwyer 


So. 


2 




6 


2 


.333 


2 


2 


1.000 


5 





6 


3.0 


Manny Papoula 


Jr. 


19 




47 


22 


.469 


18 


11 


.611 


46 


23 


55 


2.9 


John 


Ezell 


Sr. 


28 




70 


28 


.310 


42 


24 


.571 


132 


62 


80 


2.8 


Charlie Chaney 


Jr. 


4 




9 


3 


.333 


4 


3 


.750 


5 


3 


9 


2.3 


Bob Ward 


Jr. 


9 




12 


4 


.333 


2 


1 


.500 


10 


8 


9 


1.0 






' m 



f 

* » 



^^'7'^ ^-^^^Tfy^'^^^^li^^^si 







BASEBALL 



221 



V J/ 




f^jrj^srr^' 



Season's Record — Won 11, Lost 8 



B.C. 


3 


M.I.T 


2 


B.C. 


9 


Brandeis 





B.C. 


3 


Providence 


4 


B.C. 


7 


Dartmouth 


5 


B.C. 


3 


Colby 


I 


B.C. 


9 


B.U. 


6 


B.C. 





Northeastern 


7 


B.C. 


9 


Harvard 


6 


B.C. 


2 


Tufts 


1 


B.C. 


2 


B.U. 


1 


B.C. 


14 


Tufts 


8 


B.C. 


1 


Springfield 


12 


B.C. 


5 


Providence 


4 


B.C. 





Northeastern 


1 


B.C. 


2 


Amheist 


9 


B.C. 


9 


Rhode Island 


3 


B.C. 


5 


Holy Cross 


8 


B.C. 


6 


Holy Cross 


13 


B.C. 


1 


Holy Cross 


3 




222 






223 




m 










Frowt roil' fZe/t to right): Bill O'Neil (Manager), Jim McGowan, Bob Murphy, Frank DeFelice, Captain John Frame, Coach 
Ed Pellagrini, Al Hoyt, Bill Mulcahy, Steve Murray, Mike Jones (Manager). Second row: Tom Anderson, Fred Prifty, Paul 
Sullivan, Fran Kearns, Jim Whalen, John Eydenburg, Richard Bauchesne, John Rotondo, Paul Mullare. Third row: Jan 
VanDenBerghe, Mark VanDenBerghe, George Kerivan, Dick Hutchinson, Ed Foley, Kevin Mahoney, Ron Bleakney, Frank 
Riley, Ed McElaney, John Wilkins. 



Individual Batting 



Player 


AB 


H 


R 


2B 


3B HR 


so 


w 


RBI 


Ave. 


Player 


AB 


H 


R 


2B 


3B HR 


so 


w 


RBI 


Ave. 


Bill Mulcahy 


70 


14 


24 


1 





1 


9 


4 


11 


.343 


Ed Foley 


13 


3 


6 








1 


2 


5 


3 


.462 


Fred Prifty 


75 


17 


26 


4 


1 


5 


20 


6 


16 


.337 


Ed Hockenbury 





























.000 


Kevin Maloney 


69 


10 


22 


4 


1 


1 


10 


11 


10 


.317 


Al Hoyt 


1 


2 























.000 


Tom Anderson 


60 


10 


15 


3 








6 


6 


3 


.250 


Dick Hutchinson 


8 


2 


1 




















.125 


Ed McElaney 


15 





4 





1 





1 


2 


3 


.267 


Fran Kearns 


60 


5 


5 


1 








20 


9 





.084 


Frank DeFelice 


39 


6 


9 








1 


11 


1 


5 


.231 


George Kerivan 


8 


























.000 


John Frame 


75 


10 


16 











9 


8 


7 


.213 


Paul Mullare 


6 


2 


1 













2 





.167 


Jim Whalen 


27 





4 


1 








5 





1 


.156 


Bob Murphy 


1 


1 






















.000 


Jim McGowen 


65 


4 


9 





2 





22 


7 


8 


.139 


Steve Murray 


1 

























.000 


Dick Beauchesne 


3 





1 











1 








.333 


Frank Riley 


5 





1 













1 


1 


.200 


Ron Bleakney 





























.000 


John Rontondo 


7 


1 


1 








1 




1 


1 


.143 


Phil Carlino 





























.000 


Mike Valenti 





























.000 


Tom Carloni 





























.000 


J. VanDenBergh 





























.000 


Art Carter 


15 


1 


1 











2 








.067 


M. VanDenBergh 


1 

















1 








.000 


John Eydenburg 


9 


























.000 

























224 




Player 



IP 



R ER 



ERA 



SO 



W H Won Lost 



Art Carter 


8 


48 


24 


15 


2.81 


31 


28 


35 


3 


1 


Dick Hutchinson 


9 


241/3 


15 


12 


4.44 


19 


16 


15 


2 





George Kerivan 


6 


211/3 


8 


6 


2.40 


9 


8 


19 


2 





Frank Rilev 


2 


4% 


1 


1 


1.93 


3 


1 


2 


1 





John Rotondo 


6 


211/3 


14 


7 


2.94 


9 


14 


21 


1 





Ed Foley 


5 


311/3 


22 


20 


5.75 


20 


12 


32 


2 


3 


Mark VanDenBergh 


2 


2% 


1 


1 


3.86 


3 


3 


3 





1 


Jan VanDenBergh 


1 





3 


3 


27.00 





1 


1 





1 


Dick Beauchesne 


6 


91/3 


8 


6 


5.80 


6 


11 


7 





2 


Ron Bleaknev 


3 


5% 


2 


2 


3.01 


1 


3 


7 








Mike Valenti 


1 


31/3 


3 


2 


5.40 


3 


1 


4 









225 



TRACK 




Led by the individual performances of Chuck 
Zailowski, Captain Lucien Tessier, and Bob Gilvey, 
the 1964-65 Boston College Track Team, coached 
for the twelfth year by Bill Gilligan, established 
itself as the leading squad in the New England 
Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Tessier, a 
sprinter from Manchester, N.H., contributed 
heavily to B.C.'s victories over MIT, Rhode Island, 
and Boston University, as he ran a season best of 
6.4 seconds for the fifty yard dash. At times Tessier 
also found himself in the role of low hurdler; he 
even scored points in pole vault competition. 

Zailkowski, a hurdler-quarter miler from Provi- 
dence, R.I., has been the best hurdler at the 
Heights since '59 when Bagdad's Samir Vincent 
started to tear-up New England tracks. Chuck was 
beaten just once in the '65 season, and reached 
the highpoint of his career when he won both the 
high and low hurdles in the UConn relays, while 
his teammates won the New England relay cham- 
pionship; Zailowski also ran a leg on the B.C. mile 
relay squad which ran the fastest time in New 
England. 

Bob Gilvey, a senior quarter miler from New 
Jersey, was the standout on the Eagle's squad as he 
went undefeated in dual meet competition and set 
two cage records in New England track circles. 
Gilvey ran the 600 in 1: 14 against MIT to break 
the cage record which he had held since his sopho- 
more year . . . 




226 





227 




Then in February against Harvard, Bob 
ran through the tape in 1 : 12.8 for a Briggs 
Cage record. In the Boston K of C meet, he 
ran the 600 in 1:11.2, a Boston College 
record and the fastest time by an Eastern 
Collegiate runner. 

Another standout on the B.C. squad was 
sophomore Bill Norris who set a Greater 
Boston Collegiate record in the mile at 
4: 16.1, as he won the G.B.C. title by sixty 
yards. Norris was also leadoff man on the 
two mile relay team which won the New 
York K of C meet. 

With Paul Delaney, John Carroll, Chris 
Lane, and Norris toting the baton, the B.C. 
two mile relay achieved a ranking in the 
top five on the east coast. The one mile 
relay team was just as successful as Joe 
Kopka, Chris Lane, Zailkowski, and Gilvey 
ran for two seconds and a first in three at- 
tempts. Lu Tessier also ran one of the Eagle 
mile relays to add the quarter mile to his 
repertoire of events. 

In the field events, B.C. found itself with 
one of the most versatile weight men in 
years, as John Fiore consistently scored over 
ten points in every meet to take the high 
scoring honors on the Eagle's squad. Senior 
Dick Clarke, the Boston College record 
holder in the high jump, had his usual fine 
season as he lost but twice in the indoor 
high jump competition. 




228 



r'' II H 





WRESTLING 



"I wonder how this looks on TV?" 




Led by the performances of Co-captains Bob 
Dobrz)'nski and Gene "Bronco" McCreary, the 
Eagles' Wresthng Team grappled to an 8-4 record 
for the 1964-65 season. Coach Jim Maloney's 
young team, which has had but three year's orga- 
nized experience, opened the season at the Heights 
with a crushing 24-8 victory over the Crusaders 
from Holy Cross. The Cross wrestlers, fresh from 
the previous Saturday's football defeat at the hands 
of the Maroon and Gold, made the mistake of re- 
turning to the scene of their frustration where the 
B.C. matsmen promptly captured six of eight 
events. 

Later on in the season, the Eagles traveled to 
Connecticut and dumped the LTConns to the tune 
of 24-5. Matt Avitable continued his winning ways 
as he notched his third victory of the season by 
pinning his man after only two minutes of the 
match. 

The best match of the year, however, was against 
Emerson College in mid-February as the Eagles 
came off a two game losing skein against Hartford 
and Albany State to down the Emerson grapplers 
by 28-6. Before a television crowd of Channel 38 
rooters, footballer Rick Bradley, Dobrzynski, and 
McCreary easily ground their opponents into the 
mats as the Eagles made their TV debut a success- 
ful one. 



"Watch the fingernails! 





"The strongest thing about you 



"You'll be sorry!" 




"Guess who started on the 1 9th hole?" 



GOLF /SKIING 



Despite the fact that Captain JefF Hartley 
was selected as the outstanding competitor 
in New England collegiate ski circles, the 
1965 version of the Boston College ski team 
had a disappointing season as they finished 
seventh in their ten-team league, ahead of 
Boston University, A.I.C., and Brown. 

However, there were some high points 
in the season, especially when freshman 
Dick Ballou, in competition against N.E.'s 
best collegiate skiers, finished third in the 
grueling two-run slalom at Pat's Peak, New 
Hampshire. Then, of course, the B.C. Eagles 
did lay claim to the best athlete on the slopes 
as Hanley was selected to receive the 
NEISC's "Recognition Award of 1965," 
having been named on every judges' ballot 
in the annual selections of the New England 
conference. 




Varsity Ski Team 



t^ 



If * '*H,;jt3S 



I\ 



•MMi 




231 



LU 



< 



CAMPUS COUNCIL MIXER 
featuring 

JIM LUCIE 
AND THE HEIGHTSMAN 

Such signs are obsolete no^u. Yet as we look back upon the many 
memories and experiences of four years at Boston College, we notice 
that, perhaps more than anyone else, Jim Lucie has been with the Class 
of 1965. 

Like most of us, ]im arrived at B. C. with a little bit of awe and 
a pocketful of confidence . But unlike most new arrivals, he was putting 
it to good use almost from the moment he touched foot on the campus. 
For while we were still asking upperclassmen for directions to McHugh 
Forum, Jim luas organizing a rock 'n' roll hand; and by the end of 
orientation week he and his comrades had rocked their way to a winning 
performance in the Freshman Talent Show. Shortly thereafter, the 
group signed a contract for their first mixer and have been rolling 
ever since. 

The Heightsmen specialize in the rhythmic, up-tempo music that 
has become identifed with our "beat" generation. An organ, two guitars, 
and a drum make most songs something less than subtle, but Jim's 
versatility on the sax lends a pleasant freshness and melody to their 
rock 'n' roll repertoire. He is equally accomplished with the more 
sophisticated "blues" ballads, and his interpretations of the "cool" 
sounds of modern jazz are tour de force. 

Many of our leisure hours at the Heights have been spent listening 
and dancing to his music. Some of us have even travelled to hear him 
play at various clubs in Boston and the Cape. But whether ^ue prefer 
the twist, the monkey, or the slow, romantic fox-trot, Jim plays them 
all well, and because he does, he has played an important part in our 
social lives. 



232 




J^ 




%< ' 






CAMPU 



tn 



< 




Luc ie has been with the Class 



MIXER 



N 

Such signs are ohs^^k. now. \ ei as w eJw fi hack upon the many 
memories and experie(ji^^of fi^Sl|jSr.s c^^^m9st^0n College, we notice 
that, perhaps more thai - ^ ■ 
of 1965. 

Like most of us, Jim t(i 
a pocketful of confidence, 
it to good use almost j; 
For while ire ipe^^Mill li\ 
Forum, Jim ivas WSgff 
orientation wcfik'ne ^tKLh 
perfoi wan<^' in theyK^m 
group signed, a contrav'M^^t 
ever sihce. m 

T.he Hei'^hismen spe< 

;(f(;v)i«p ini-'tifihfi'. 



'. Ai'ith a little hit of awe and 

ii~)si iic^r arrivals, he ivas putting 

111 he t6ifched foot on the campus. 

irebtions to McHugh 

and ^N4eew^ of 

ir way to a winhing 

tly thereafter, tfte 

have he&n rolling^ 

-tempo niMsic that 
organ, tif^ guitars, 
subtle, mk Jim's 
d melodyJJto their 
d with me more 
of ths "cool" 




has become idefifipcd with 
and p drum nmk& most songi 
versatilit} on the sva lends a 
roclv. 'n' roll reperthire He is eqi 
soplmsiicated ''bhl^i' ballads, and^ 
sounds of modem jbzz aie tour de 
/ Man\ of out ^^h^ure houi s at 
ana daneitng^o his m-mJc. Some^Ojfiii\ havi 
playlet -laiions clubs in Boston and the Ca 
the Iwist, the monkey, oi the s/oiL romantic 
all well, and because he does, he has played an important part in our 
social lives. 



spent kUening 

d to lijc^ him 

11^ prefer 

lah them 



232 





':-^a^^ 











FEATURE SPORTS 



234 



The Eagles closed their most successful basket- 
ball season on record with a disappointing and 
short trip to the NIT in Madison Square Garden. 
St. John's, an up and down team most of the year, 
had beaten number one ranked Michigan at Christ- 
mas, but after a disastrous last month of the season 
were striving to regain the recognition that had 
eluded them. Its first visit to the NIT, B.C. was 
against a team that had won four times previously. 
It was a case of an old ex-Celtic, Joe Lapchick in 
his last year, against a new. Bob Cousy in his 
second season. 

St. John's, led by Sonny Dove and Ken Mclntyre, 
took the lead from the start and never looked back. 
For B.C. the bright spots were provided by two 
retiring seniors and one far from retiring junior. 
The 1 8 point performance of Bob Furbush and the 
husthng defense of Captain George Humann were 
excellent finales for two fine ballplayers. Junior 
John Austin, who can't miss in Madison Square 
Garden, hit from every spot on the floor for 40 
points. Austin, already the owner of every season 
and career scoring record at the Heights, played at 
an exhausting pace and put on the flashiest per- 
formance of the first night of the tournament. This 
performance and the obvious fact that B.C. is one 
year away from exploding into a basketball power 
made the pilgrimage to New York City worthwhile 
for over 1000 Boston College students. 





BASKETBALL- NJX 






235 




John Austin: All American 




236 




ECAC 



Off to a blazing start in the first round of 
the ECAC Tourney, Boston College's Eagles 
held on for a 5-3 win over Dartmouth and 
moved another step closer toward the NCAA 
championships. Fierce defensive play and 
devastating charges on goalie Budge Gere 
gave the Eagles a 3-0 advantage after the 
first chapter. This lead was eventually built 
up to 5-0, after which Dartmouth began to 
recover from the massive onslaught. Captain 
Eddie Downes started the deluge for the 
Eagles and was quickly followed up by E. J. 
Breen's rush at the nets and Ralph Toran's 
high shot into the corner of the cage. The 
scoring for the Eagles was closed out in the 
second period as Phil Dyer lifted a perfect 
relay pass into the net and Dick Fuller un- 
loaded a point blank shot that took off Gere's 
head. Dartmouth got on the scoring board 
with Bill Jevne's shot in the second and Bill 
Smoyer's and Jim Cooper's registers in the 
last period of action ... It was Pat Murphy's 
flashy goal tending that did the trick again 
and saved the Eagles as he stopped 30 shots 
in front of the nets. 

Boston Arena was the scene of the second 
ECAC game. Clarkson College, having 
previously beaten B.C. in regular season 
competition, was out to do it again. The 
Eagles were hard pressed throughout the 
game, entering the last period traifing 2-1. 
Never conceding defeat for an instant, the 
determined Eagles played just a little bit 
harder in the third and final period. That 
extra surge paid off with a goal by sopho- 
more Jerry York, thus tieing the game and 
sending it into overtime play. For the fifth 
time this year the B.C. team was faced with 
a sudden-death situation — only now it 
decided possible tournament honors . . . 











2^8 



It was Allan Keirstead who pulled out the 
victory for the Eagles; a short slap shot 
proved to be the one thing which gave B.C. 
the right to meet Brown the following night 
for the championship game and a chance to 
gain a berth in the NCAA competition. 

With Dartmouth and Clarkson dead and 
buried, B.C. went on to capture the ECAC 
title with a 6-2 romp over Brown. In just 
over five minutes the Eagles eliminated 
Brown, as four goals in 3:21 of the first 
canto sounded the death knell. Things were 
even for the first two minutes, but Pete 
Flahert}' faked to Goalie Ferguson's left and 
tipped the puck over his shoulder for a one- 
nothing lead. Then it was mass onslaught 
as John Cunniff, Ralph Toran, and E. J. 
Breen made shambles of the Brown defen- 
sive line to four-up the hapless home team. 
Terry Chapman put the Bruins on the 
board with a deflected pass that slipped past 
Murphy, but it was already too late for 
Brown as Phil Dyer came right back with a 
four foot slap into the nets. Brown's Bruce 
Darling slapped a sweet one past Murphy, 
but B.C.'s York brought back the Eagle's 
four goal advantage and finished off^ the 
scoring for the night. 




qF 








^i9i 


W ^^^^^^^^_rj 




Jpi 


E^L 


•<^ •^■»k^.<^-^^H 


T^J 


p ^ 


^ 


• 








239 















240 





The Eagles of B.C. opened up the first 
round of the NCAA championships as they 
completely shocked and startled a capacity 
crowd at Brown University's arena by down- 
ing a heavily favored North Dakota sextet to 
the tune of 4-3. It was York again, along 
with a brilliant performance from goalie Pat 
Murphy — who must have been seeing 
pucks in his dreams — that assured B.C. 
the championship round against Michigan 
Tech. It was also the sweet taste of revenge 
for the Eagles, for they had been dumped 
from NCAA competition two years back by 
this same Dakota squad. York was the big 
man in this victory as he iced two goals and 
kept the puck moving in and out of the 
Dakota defensemen. John Cunniff, the lead- 
ing scorer in the nation, also racked up a 
goal for the Eagles, and was especially sharp 
in the passing department. Dick Fuller, 
skating perhaps his best game of the season, 
lifted an off-target shot by Moylan and 
tipped it into the net past Dakota's Joe Leek 
who was down on the ice. 




'^*''l^. 



''^^ 



"mno,,.. 




241 










242 



NCAA 



The final game of the season for the 
Eagles was the big one, the NCAA cham- 
pionship against Michigan Tech at Brown 
University. This time it was the Huskies 
who rammed into the Eagles for a quick 6-0 
lead, and the Heightsmen never recovered. 
The Michigan team displayed blinding 
speed and adept stick work, the likes of 
which haven't been seen around the east in 
quite a while, and it too much for the B.C. 
defensemen to handle. The Eagles may have 
been down, but E. J. Breen managed to 
light the lights with an individual rush at 
the Michigan goalie, while Jim Mullen put 
the last goal of the season on the chords, 
finishing off a perfect break with assists from 
Cunniff and Dyer. The trio's final goal was 
tallied in t\'pical breakaway fashion as time 
ran out on the Eastern champions and the 
best team Boston College has seen since 
1949. 





243 



JUNIOR PROM 




Juniors "frug" as Lionel Hampton pla\s Ray Charles. 



A "dry" dance gets wetter. 



244 





"Alka-Seltzer, anyone?" 




A shaky affair 



245 



"Heh, heh, heh. 





Queen Marcia Lee and Court. 



JUNIOR PROM 



246 




"Nice date, Murph." 



^n 




.\>^,f^'* 











Will the real Diamond Jim Brady please stand up. 



247 



"Marry her," she says! 





"Well, maybe after a twelve-year engagement." 



"It won't be any trouble at all.' 




JUNIOR SHOW 



"Not so tight, honey!" 




The Hot Box girls. 




"Ole!" 





CHAD MITCHELL TRIO 





250 






ALAN KING 




251 




"I'll be right over." 



SATURDAY 
AFTERNOON 




"What'll you have? . . . What do you want?" 



"Put up your dukes.' 



252 






B.C. training table 



SUNDAY MORNING 




The morning after the night before 



253 




EDUCATION 




FROSH 



C.B.A. or — ! 



"Is that what they mean by a salute?" 







<^ » ' 


f 




;%^,^ 


t ,ilfr 




^<^.. 


r ■ '^.. t 


1 jl Jm 


# 


Il^il^i 


4 .1 ^fc, 


IfiOt 




liMii 


J^^^H 






Hr 


^ L J^v 




t f 


^^»r^^ 


is-M ^ 


H ^^KkHHHV 


^BQtt. 


« 


i^ 


* 


1 ^^^mmm3^BI^M W'M/y^i^M 





Join the Navy and see the world. 



254 



SKITS 



SOPHOMORE 




"I thought you'd never rub my lamp." 



"Here come the elephants." 





"Ooh, there go the elephants. 



"You should'a seen the one that got away. 



■■ 


^^^^1 




^^1^ ^^^^l^^^l 


,^gf. .^^^^L' 




^m^'^^m 


^^^ ^^^^ iKL 





"Watch out! Here comes the censor." 



EDUCATION 



JUNIOR 




"I wish I may, I wish I might 





"But Father, it's in the script.' 



"Grandma, what a big nose you have." 



256 



SKITS 




"I feel pretty 



"Let's all so to Selma." 




SENIOR 



"Frankly Sylvia, I never thought of you quite that way.' 




"Look Ma, no cavities." 




257 




L'nderstandino 





humorous . 



urbane . . . 



WRITER IN RESIDENCE 




. and always interesting Sean O'Faolain 



258 





BILLY GRAHAM 




"What a privilege it was for me to speak at Boston College this year! Never have I been more warmly received than by the students of this school." 



259 





FEATURE 




Iberian dances as performed by Laura Toledo and her Company 



260 




PERFORMERS 




The Ballet Chaffee 




Jesus Maria Sanroma 



261 




Rev. Karl Rahner, SJ., center 




John Dos Passes 



SPEAKERS 





262 Elizabeth "Libby" Miller 




Dr. Nathan Scott 




Former Governor Endicott Peabody 




Governor John A. Volpe 



263 



MILITARY BALL 





Col. Murphy greets a cadet and his date 



Music by Ken Reeves 



264 






Ball- 



Sabre Guard awaits the queen and her court 




265 




Military Ball Chairman John Landers crowns the 1965 Queen. 




The queen and her escort pass through the Sabre Guard 




266 



,*'I^Jf.ff^ 



MILITARY BALL 




Military Ball Queen Patricia L. Lynch and her escort, Paul L. Riley. 




The queen and the court 
of the 1965 Mihtary Ball 



267 





.}. 



!> 





APARTMENT 





LIVING 







APARTMENTS 




271 





THE GREAT 



Democratic candidate Francis X. Bellotti 



Faneuil Hall : the scene of the debate 



272 




Rev. W. Seavy Joyce, S.J., 
Debate Moderator 




DEBATE 




Republican Candidate John A. Volpe 



*jm:^<m- <f m.i». 




273 





CITIZENS 





I 






^■-"i^-^ 



SEMINAR 



,0'"^^ 



^W^' 





275 





ARTIST IN 





276 




RESIDENCE PROGRAM 




277 




The men 




LAY APOSTOLATE 
PROGRAM 



the school 




278 




. and the job to be done. 



V 




discussion 



/ 





An informal discussion on the terrace in Rome 




Lunchtime in Paris 



Ciudad University in Madrid 



280 




JUNIOR YEAR 
ABROAD 



A weekend in Cairo for Dennis Aniato 




Dennis Amato and another student in a Roman piazza 





ill 

alOlYMPu ' 


GIIBER? 


^^^B^^JM^^^MKj^E SwO 


m-'sm^ 


^^^V^^^^^f^bRhJI^mmiw 


L"rmsm- 




1 aKrwfc^- — 




The main building at the University of Freiburg 



281 





ICE 
CHIPS 



282 






IAN 





SYLVIA 




283 




isigSilESi 



WZ2 i:::3ii ~~ — ^H!IilBi5EIS! 

5" ^aaBBH ■««■• «■■■» !§■■■■ ■■■ 



mu 



•*-^'-di!S. 



"***-J<fcr- 



Architects drawing of the new science building 



DEVELOPMENT 




Dedication of the Carney Faculty Center 



284 



;;s SiB ?* 



s ass sii! ass S!^s! SaS 
!i!!iS9!iS 





PROGRAM 







Excavating begins on the new science building 



285 




Jim Hartnett and Gene Donahue were interviewed by Spike Brown on 
WIHS-TV. 




Gene Donahue, Business Manager of the 1965 Sub Tiirri presents the first 
annual Sub Turri Senior Achievement Award to Don Moran. 



WIHS-TV director John Donnolly controls the cameras which 
televised all of the Eagle sports events from home playing 
surfaces. 




286 




287 



CO 



< 



< 



<D 



"To the senior who in the judgment of the Faculty is most out- 
standing and representative of the College of Business Administration 
in terms of character, scholarly achievement, and contribution to student 
life through -participation in activities, and hy his loyalty and example . . ." 

This is the statement of qualifications for the Sidlivan Award, and 
it would he difficidt to find a more concise description of this year's 
recipient, lean Gosselin. 

While working towards a degree and possible career in finance, 
Jean has earned impressive honors as well as responsible positions in 
several organizations. In recognition of his high academic achievement 
in the College of Business Administration, Jean ^vas invited to partici- 
pate in the College's Honors Program and attained its Presidency. Alpha 
Sigma Nu, the Jesuit National Honor Fraternity, also elected him to its 
membership and honored him with the position of vice-president. 

Jean's interests have led him to organizations outside of the aca- 
demic world as well. Joining the Boston College R. O. T. C. Brigade in 
his freshman year, Jean rose rapidly along the chain of command and 
^vas appointed Deputy Brigade Commander this year. The national 
business fraternity. Delta Sigma Pi, adopted this young man into its 
brotherhood three years ago; Jean is now Chancellor. Last year, without 
fear of being accused of nepotism, his brothers named him the Outstand- 
ing Junior in CBA. 

His record of scholarship and leadership is truly remarkable, and 
the many offices of responsibility which his fellow students have en- 
trusted to his care and judgment speak more eloquently of his character 
and ability than any words which could be written here. It is no sur- 
prise then, that Jean Gosselin should have been chosen the "most out- 
standing and representative" student not only of the College of Business 
Administration, but of the entire University as well. 



288 




is most oiit- 
nistration 



K/> 




< 



< 



o 



nance, 

mUhns in 
■, V' " . . 1/ 

' liigh iicciilemic achimement 

I i 
',!., lean ,.wa'^ iinited to|1bartici- 
'' i-n'sidencfi Alpha 
v«feM4iii6**.vi.i;(t rdni to its 
f Vive-president. 

side/of the aca- 

O. T.jC. Bris.ade in 

command and 

he national 




288 







^ : 





please! 

KEEP yODR 
VOICES DOWAII 

WE ARE 

TRYING TO 

6TUDy 




290 




291 







Thomas D. Garvin, Jr., Vice President; John R. O'Malley, Secretary; 
John J. Griffin, Jr., President; Douglas Mello, Treasurer. 



292 





COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 



ilii 



JAMES J. AHEARN DAVID B. AMIRAULT 

B.S. Chemistry A.B. Economics 









JO ANDERSON, JR. 
A.B. Philosophy 



JOSEPH W. ARMBRUST 
B.S. Mathematics 



HOWARD J. AYLWARD 
A.B. Mathematics 



WALTER A. BACIGALUPO 
A.B. Sociology 






PETER A. BAILEY 
A.B. Economics 



LOUIS B. BALIZET 

A.B. History 




WARREN E. BARNARD KENNETH E. BEATRICE 

A.B. English A.B. Political Science 




ijk jk 



RAYMOND H. BELIVEAU PAUL D. BERGIN 

A.B. English A.B. History 



293 




JOSEPH A. BIATECKI 
A.B. English 




VICTOR J. BORTOLOT 
B.S. Physics 




TODD W. BR\BEC 
A.B. English 




STANLEY T. BIGOS 
B.S. Biology 




NORMAN R. BOUROUE 
A.B. Sociology 




EDWARD J. BREEN 
A.B. Economics 




JOSEPH N. BOLOGNINI 
A.B. Biology 





HUGH P. BONNER 
A.B. History 




STEVEN P. BOWERS JEFFREY J. BRABEC 

B.S. Physics A.B. English 




JOHN J. BROCK JOHN T. BROWNE, JR. 

A.B. Russian A.B. English 



294 




JEROME J. BYLEBYL 
A.B. History' 



Digesting exam matter 



295 




PAUL E. CALABRIA 
A.B. English 



f ^Hk 



I -^rat JEi^ 



NELSON J. CANNIFF 
B.S. Mathematics 





ii 



JOHN J. CARROLL 
A.B. English 




THOMAS CAREY 

A.B. Mathematics 



MICHAEL G. CARUSO 
B.S. Biology 




;» "S^ V^ 



^ijfe 



JOSEPH W. CASEY 
B.S. Biology 



PHILIP J. CASEY 
A.B. Economics 



IIIIBraM^^I^I^^ iSBm 




ANTONIO F. CARRARA 

A.B. Modern Language 



"Should a man offer a ladv a cmar?" 



296 





EDWARD J. CASHMAN FLORINDO J. CELONA 

A.B. History B.S. Biology 




RICHARD H. CLARKE 

B.S. Chemistry 




GEORGE J. COAKLEY 
B.S. Geology 







VICTOR F. CIARDELLO 
A.B. Economics 




RICHARD F. CLEMENT 
B.S. Geology 




J. STEPHEN COLLINS 

A.B. English 



297 






GEORGE E. COMEAUX 
A.B. English 



PAUL B. COMPA 
B.S. Geology 



JOHN T. COLLINS 
B.S. Biology 



STEPHEN R. COLUCCI 
B.S. Biology 



^ 



ii^ 




PAUL J. CONNELLY 
A.B. Political Science 



MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY 
A.B. Modern Language 



DAVID P. CONLEY 

A.B. Political Science 



BRIAN P. CONLON 

A.B. Political Science 





MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY, JR. 

A.B. Economics 



"A little too much chocolate 
flavoring." 




THOMAS J. CONWAY 

A.B. History 



CHARLES A. COREY 
B.S. Mathematics 




^s^ip 





GEORGE L. COULOMBE ROBERT B. COWAN 

A.B. Biology A.B. English 



ROGER R. CORMIER THOMAS M. COSTELLO 

B.S. Physics B.S. Mathematics 



299 





JOHN L. CROWLEY RICHARD L. CULLEN 

A.B. Economics A.B. Psychology 



JOHN J. CREEDEN RICHARD T. CREMIN 

B.S. Geology A.B. Economics 




MARTIN J. CUNNIFFE JAMES M. CURLEY 

A.B. Political Science A.B. English 





MATTHEW J. CURLEY 
A.B. English 



JOSEPH G. CUTCLIFFE 

A.B. Psychology 




300 




ROBERT P. DelSIGNORE 

A.B. Economics 





CHRISTOPHER DESIMONE 

A.B. English 



mkmM 

ARTHUR F. DIMATTIA PAUL K. DIMOND 



A.B. Biology 



B.S. Physics 



JOSEPH C. DIFEO 
B.S.. Mathematics 




ROBERT F. DOBRZYNSKI 
B.S. Biology 



JEAN G. DOLAN 
A.B. Economics 



301 




MARK J. DRISCOLL 
A.B. Mathematics 



"You were expecting Otto Graham?" 



302 




PHILIP G. DUFFY 
B.S. Biology 




JOSEPH S. DUMAS 
A.B. Psychology 



WILLIAM S. DUNLANY 
A.B. Political Science 




FREDERIC G. ECKHARD 

A.B. Philosophy 



JAMES C. ECKLOFF 
B.S. Physics 



303 





•»v iKSr Fl 



JOSEPH B. EZHAYA 

A.B. Political Science 



JOHN E. FEDELE 

A.B. Political Science 



mkmM 




"^ ,***■ \\i 




JAMES H. FEENEY 

A.B. English 



RICHARD N. FELL 
B.S. Physics 



WILLIAM V. FERRIS THOMAS K. FITZGERALD 

A.B. Political Science A.B. Economics 








WILLIAM M. FITZGERALD 
A.B. Economics 



KEVIN P. FLYNN 
A.B. Modern Language 



/<h ?»■ 



ii 



MICHAEL F. FLYNN 
A.B. Economics 




PAUL B. FORD 
A.B. Philosophy 




DAVID W. FOX 

A.B. English 



THOMAS F. FRAHER 

A.B. Psychology 



304 




JAMES J. GADBOIS JOHN H. GALLIGAN 

A.B. Classics B.S. Mathematics 



Theology is so soothing. 




THOMAS D. GARVIN 

A.B. Political Science 



DAVID R. GAVIN 

A.B. Economics 




THOMAS J. GAVLICK 

A.B. Economics 



PAUL L. GERAGHTY 
A.B. Economics 



305 






VINCENT Q. GIFFUNI 
A.B. Economics 



ROBERT W. GILVEY 

A.B. English 



FREDERICK GERVASI 

A.B. Sociology 



NICHOLAS GIANTURCO 

A.B. Econotnics 








GEORGE M. GINGERELLI WALTER J. GLEASON 

B.S. Mathematics A.B. Russian 




BRUCE D. GORMLEY 

A.B. English 



IRVING J. GOSS 
A.B. English 



"If only she'd calL" 



306 




FREDERIC W. GRANNIS 
A.B. Biology 



THEODORE J. HAJEK 

A.B. Slavic Studies 



W^' 




JOHN J. GRIFFIN 
A.B. Political Science 




STEPHEN A. HALKOVIC 
A.B. Political Science 





STEPHEN C. GRIFFIN 

A.B. History 




DENNIS L. HALLISEY 
A.B. English 



HOWARD J. HANNOLD 

A.B. English 



fy 




ROBERT GUNDERSON 

A.B. English 




JOHN W. HAMBLETON 
A.B. Economics 




WILLIAM W. HANNON 

A.B. Economics 



JAMES F. HAMMILL 
A.B. History 



DENNIS J. HANLON 

A.B. Economics 



307 






JOSEPH M. HARDY 
A.B. History 



JOHN W. HANRAHAN 
A.B. English 



WILLIAM P. HARDIMAN 
A.B. History 





'Sfc "^ 



tMmk 

HENRY J. HARRINGTON THOMAS J. HARRINGTON 
A.B. History A.B. Economics 



JAMES G. HARTNETT 
A.B. English 



PAUL M. HARRIGAN 

A.B. Economics 




PETER C. HARTZEL 

A.B. Economics 




RICHARD K. HOEFLING 
B.S. Physics 



FRANCIS E. HASSEY JOHN G. HEDSTROM 

A.B. Economics A.B. Biology 



308 




RAYFORD P. HOSKER 

B.S. Physics 




VINCENT P. HOUSER 
A.B. Psychology 



JOHN R. HOUSTON 
A.B. Classics 



JOHN C. HOWARD 
A.B. English 



NEAL E. HUNT 
A.B. English 




WILLIAM J. HURLEY 
B.S. Physics 



CHRISTOPHER HUSSON 
B.S. Physics 





STEPHEN H. KARR 
A.B. English 



"Just enough to serve four.' 



GEORGE L. KELEHER 

B.S. Biology 



EDWARD F. KELLEY 

A.B. Mathematics 





PETER M. KINNEY 
A.B. Economics 



ROBERT J. KOTERBAY 
B.S. Biology 



CHESTER E. kOZLUWMvi 
A.B. Economics 



311 




'•» 



tm 



DOUGLAS R. LaBRECQUE 
B.S. Biology 






GERALD LAGADEC 

A.B. English 



WILLIAM M. LAMONTAGNE JOHN E. LANDERS 

A.B. Economics A.B. English 

"Jule, Yule, what's the difference?" 




THOMAS E. Le CLAIR LOUIS A. LEGGERO 

A.B. English A.B. Economics 




PAUL E. MacDONALD 
B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH H. LYNCH 
A.B. History 



WILLIAM J. LYNCH 

A.B. Psychology 



314 





JOHN J. McCarthy 

A.B. Political Science 




JOHN J. Mcdonald 

A.B. Political Science 



JOSEPH W. MacDOUGALL 

A.B. Political Science 



DANIEL J. MacNEIL 
B.S. Biology 




315 





EDWIN J. Mcdonough lawrence j. mcdonough 

A.B. English B.S. Geology 





"Pizza!" 



MICHAEL G. Mcdonough edward r. McFarland 

B.S. Mathematics A.B. Biology 





JAMES E. McGOWAN 

A.B. Economics 



JOHN P. McGUINESS 
A.B. Political Science 



PETER M. McGAHAN 
A.B. Sociology 



PHILIP F. McGOUGH 

A.B. English 



316 





MICHAEL G. McGUNNIGLE EDWARD C. McGUIRE 



A.B. English 



A.B. History 







ALAN F. McINTYRE 
A.B. Political Science 



JOSEPH T. McLaughlin 

A.B. History 



f^^t 



MICHAEL J. McLaughlin james McMUllen 

A.B. History B.S. Mathematics 









JOHN M. MACKIN WILLIAM E. MADDEN 



HUGH W. McNEIL 
A.B. Economics 



4ik 



HOWARD F. McRAE 
B.S. Chemistry 



A.B. History 



B.S. Biology 





JOHN A. MADIGAN 
A.B. Modern Language 



JOSEPH A. MAGNER 
B.S. Mathematics 



317 




JAMES J. MAHONEY, JR. 
A.B. Economics 



w 





JOSEPH G. MANSFIELD 
A.B. Enslish 




GERALD P. MAITLAND 

B.S. Biology 



0^ 


1 






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W 


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^ 



ROBERT L. MARIER 

A.B. Biology 







JOHN J. MASTROPOLO DOUGLAS MELLO 

A.B. Economics A.B. History 





CHARLES M. MALKEMUS JAMES K. MANNING 

B.S. Biology A.B. English 




VINCENT E. MARIER 
B.S. Mathematics 






JOHN L. MASON 

A.B. Political Science 




J. RUSSELL MELOCIK FRANCIS J. MICHELS 

A.B. Economics A.B. Economics 



318 




THOMAS F. MITCHELL 
B.S. Mathematics 



JOSEPH M. MORAN 
B.S. Geology 



RONALD P. MORASH 

A.B. Mathematics 



319 





iai^ 



PAUL R. MORONEY EDMOND J. MORRISSEY 

A.B. Economics A.B. Classics 




RAYMOND D. MUDD 
A.B. History 



JAMES A. MULCAHY 
B.S. Mathematics 








Jiii 



PAUL A. MULLARE 
A.B. Economics 



JOSEPH F. MURPHY 

A.B. Economics 





PETER H. MURRAY 
A.B. Economics 



STEPHEN P. MURRAY 

A.B. Economics 



320 






'86 Proof" 







THOMAS J. MURRAY 
A.B. Psychology 



BLAISE NAGY 

A.B. Classics 




FRANCIS NICHOLSON ANTONIO M. NICOLAZZO 

B.S. Geology A.B. Economics 




ARTHUR L. NORRIS 
A.B. Economics 



ANDREW J. O'BRIEN 
A.B. English 



RONALD P. NIEF 

A.B. English 



PAUL F. NIOSI 

A.B. Biology 



321 




JOHN G. PATTEN 

A.B. English 



GERARD J. O'NEIL 
B.S. Chemistry 



HAROLD F. O'NEIL 

A.B. Psychology 



322 




WILLIAM H. PLEINES 

A.B. English 



EUGENE A. PHILLIPS 
B.S. Chemistry 



DENNIS A. PIOPPI 
B.S. Mathematics 



323 




mk^ 



'10 miles — time to refuel." 



FRANK J. QUINN 
A.B. English 



JAMES T. QUINN 
A.B. History 



324 




JOHN P. QUINN 

A.B. English 



RICHARD S. RADOMSKI 
A.B. Economics 





JERALD RAFANIELLO PAUL A. RAYMOND 

A.B. Economics B.S. Biology 




WILLIAM J. REAGAN 
B.S. Chemistry 




m^ 



JOHN R. REDFERN JAMES M. REILLY 

B.S. Mathematics A.B. English 



325 





ijitti 





*sft '^K^ 



WILLIAM A. REILLY, JR. 

A.B. History 



GEORGE F. RENNIE 

A.B. Political Science 



iiiii 





PAUL R. RENZI 

A.B. German 



JOHN RIREIRO, JR. 

A.B. Psychology 



n^ "^^ 



THOMAS J. RILEY 
A.B. English 



m 

JOHN A. ROBERTS 
A.B. History 





WILLIAM P. RODRIGUES JOSEPH P. ROGAN 

A.B. Economics A.B. Biology 




"What do you think I'm doing?" 



326 




JON D. SCHNEIDER 

B.S. Physics 



DAVID G. SEABROOK 

A.B. Mathematics 



GARY J. SENCIO 

A.B. Political Science 



327 




LEONARD A. SEVIGNEY 
A.B. Economics 




RICHARD H. SGARZI 
A.B. Economics 



"So that's an intestine. 




ROBERT A. SHANN 
A.B. English 




PHILIP SHERIDAN 
B.S. Physics 




JOHN F. SHIELDS 

A.B. English 



WILLIAM S. SILVER 
B.S. Mathematics 



328 






iiiii 



MATTHEW M. SOLDANO 
A.B. Mathematics 



JEFFREY P. SOMERS 

A.B. English 



DAVID G. SKEHAN 
A.B. Economics 



EDWIN D. SMITH i 

A.B. Economics l 





CHARLES J. SOUTHWICK 
A.B. History 



tfi 



ROBERT E. STEINLE 
A.B. Modern Language 




EDWARD R. STEPHENSON WILLIAM A. STERLING 

A.B. English A.B. Economics 




ROBERT A. SWECH 
A.B. English 



THOMAS C. STEVENS 
A.B. Mathematics 



ALFREDO A. SUAREZ 
B.S. Physics 



329 



'I didn't know you felt this way.' 




ROBERT P. TREDEAU 

A.B. English 



ALLAN E. TOMPSON 
A.B. Mathematics 



DANIEL F. TOOMEY 

A.B. English 



330 







ii ii 



iiiik 



GEORGE J. TYSON 

A.B. Economics 



JAMES P. VARY 
B.S. Physics 



THOMAS M. TREVISANI 
A.B. English 



WALTER J. TRYBULSKI 

A.B. Political Science 




331 






GARY R. VUJS 
B.S. Mathematics 



PAUL C. WARING 

A.B. English 



JOSEPH A. VENA 
A.B. Economics 



JOHN E. VERNON 
A.B. English 





MARK J. WASSMANSDORF 
B.S. Mathematics 




WILLIAM J. WATSON 
B.S. Biology 



"Get ready to run! 



332 




ROBERT P. WHITE 

A.B. Economics 



333 




DENNIS P. WILLIAMS 
A.B. English 





il 



VINCENT G. WINO 
B.S. Mathematics 



"She's my goil, see?" 




JAMES F. WOODS 
A.B. English 




DAVID F. ZOLLER 

A.B. Psychology 



334 




335 




Mary E. Sweeney, Vice President; Dennis F. Corkery, President; 
William J. Hayes, Secretary; Sandra L. Leclair, Treasurer. 



336 




PHILIP L. BADDERS 
B.S. General Business 



JOANNE H. BERGERON 
B.S. Education 





DONALD P. COLLINS 

B.S. General Business 



ELIZABETH A. CONLEY 
B.S. Accounting 



EDMUND G. CROWLEY 

A.B. History 



EVENING COLLEGE 




FULVIO L. BERRINI 

B.S. Education 




JOHN P. FLANAGAN 
A.B. English 



JOHN T. BRADLEY 
B.S. Accounting 




ROGER L. CONNOR DENNIS F. CORKERY 

B.S. General Business A.B. English 




JOYCE S. FLANSBURG 
A.B. History 



337 




GRACE P. KELLY 
B.S. Education 



SANDRA L. LECLAIR 
B.S. Education 



JOHN J. LYNCH 

A.B. History 



338 




Q 


^£^ 


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BARBARA J. McLEAN 
^.S. Social Science 



GERALD C. MARTIN 
B.S. Finance 




JAMES J. ONDZES 
B.S. General Business 



THERESE K. O'NEILL 

B.S. Accounting 




.¥ 






^ 


/ 


■-^ x^ 


'^^ 


'■1 



DONALD M. O'ROURKE 

A.B. History 



SUZANNE M. PLANTE 
A.B. English 




339 



?«*sa 



MARY P. PLONOWSKI 
A.B. Ensjish 





RAYMOND A. SABA 
B.S. Social Science 



ELEANORE M. VOUTSELAS 
A.B. History 



THOMAS E. SEVIGNY 
B.S. Accounting 




DAVID J. WALSH 

B.S. General Business 






MARY E. SWEENEY HELEN C. TAYLOR 

B.S. Social Science A.B. English 



PAUL M. ZANOTTI 
B.S. Social Science 



340 




341 




William V. Drummey, President; Paul L. Riley, Treasurer; 
Paul E. Pescatore, Secretary; Leonard M. Frisoli, Vice President. 



342 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 




SALVATORE D. ARMENIO GEORGE A. BALDWIN 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Production 




LOUIS T. BALLERENE 

B.S. Accounting 



EDWARD G. BARRY 
B.S. Production 




JOSEPH A. BARANOSKY 
B.S. Accounting 



HUGH J. BARRY 

B.S. Production 




JOHN J. BATTOS 
B.S. Accounting 



PAUL D. BAUER 
B.S. Accounting 



343 





mMm 



STEPHEN M. BEADER PAUL A. BELFORD 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting 






ROBERT H. BERRY 

B.S. Accounting 



PETER J. BERTOLAMI 
B.S. Marketing 





MARCELLING E. BLANCO AUGUSTIN BLONGASTAINER 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH C. BEVIVINO GENE J. BISHOP 

B.S. Finance B.S. Marketing 



344 





ROBERT F. BOLAND 
B.S. Finance 



AUSTEN J. BONO 
B.S. Accounting 




"One hen, two ducks, three squawking geese 



DANIEL J. BRADY 

B.S. Finance 




JOSEPH M. BREED 
B.S. Accounting 




THOMAS F. BURKE 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES J. BROGAN JOHN F. BRUNELLI 

B.S. Economics B.S. Finance 



345 




JOHN M. CALLAHAN, JR. 
B.S. Economics 



"Do you wish to attempt that once more?" 



346 




JAMES A. CANNINGTON 
B.S. Economics 




JOHN J. CARROLL 
B.S. Finance 



ALBERT B. CARVELLI 

B.S. Accounting. 




JOHN O. CAPUANO 

B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH P. CARROLL 
B.S. Finance 




DANIEL S. CASEY 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS E. CARLONI 
B.S. Prodziction 



ROBERT W. CARROLL 
B.S. Production 




JOSEPH P. CARMODY 
B.S. Finance 




WALLACE E. CARROLL 
B.S. Marketing 




DONALD P. CASEY 

B.S. Marketing 



LOUIS E. CERCONE 
B.S. Finance 



347 




LESTER W. CHADWICK LEONARD A. CHIARIELLO 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Accounting 




THOMAS B. CHISHOLM 
B.S. Marketing 



ERNEST J. CONGILIANDO 
B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS J. CLARK 
B.S. Marketing 




ROBERT F. CONNOLLY MICHAEL F. CONNOR 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Marketing 



348 




WILLIAM C. CONNOR 

B.S. Marketing 




JOHN A. COPPOLA 
B.S. Economics 




JOHN E. COTTER FRANCIS G. COUGHLIN 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accoitntins 




RAYMOND A. COYLE 
B.S. Marketing 



LAWRENCE J. CREHAN 
B.S. Accounting 



349 




JOHN F. ijALI 
B.S. Marketing 



350 




FRED A. DECARO 
B.S. Acconntmg 





STEPHEN C. DEMIANCZYK 

B.S. Marketing 



J. DAVID DEROSIER 
B.S. Finance 



FRANCIS A. DEFELICE 
B.S. Business Administration 




KENNETH F. DOLAN 
B.S. Marketing 



DAVID J. DOHERTY 
B.S. Production 



351 




EUGENE J. DONAHUE 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL A. DORA 
B.S. Marketing 



BRIAN J. DONNELLAN 
B.S. Accounting 




EDWARD J. DOWNES 

B.S. Marketing 





"Oh Holy Cross, on bended knee . 



WILLIAM T. DOYLE WILLIAM V. DRUMMEY 

B.S. Business Administration B.S. Accounting 



352 




•^^^^ 




iiii^ 




EDWARD D. DUGGAN 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT M. DURSIN 
B.S. Economics 



BRIAN P. DUFFY 

B.S. Marketing 



JAMES F. DUFFY 
B.S. Marketing 




PAUL R. FLAHERTY 

B.S. Finance 



CHARLES F. FEENEY 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN H. FISH, JR. 

B.S. Production 



353 




KEVIN M. FLATLEY 

B.S. Economics 



RICHARD E. FORTIN 
B.S. Accounting 





BERNARD A, FOISY 
B.S. Marketing 



WALTER A. FLYNN 
B.S. Accounting 





LEONARD M. FRISOLI 

B.S. Finance 



JOHN D. FRECHETTE 

i.S. Business Admitiistration 



PAUL J. FOLEY 
B.S. Accounting 




PAUL M. FRYDRYCH 
B.S. Production 




WILLIAM J. GERETY 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT T. FUCILE 
B.S. Accounting 



PAUL G. GALLO 
B.S. Production 



354 




JEAN P. GOSSELIN 
B.S. Accounting 



"Naturally business is run in a military-like manner. 



355 




JOHN E. HANDWERK 
B.S. Marketing 



.a^ ^ ' J!/»-^«s- -"vr 



356 




WILLIAM J. HARDY 
B.S. Economics 




CORNELIUS J. HARTE 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM G. HAYWARD 
B.S. Economics 




Notice the asscot. LAWRENCE W. HOLLAND 
B.S. Marketing 



JOHN C. HORAN 
B.S. Marketing 



357 





DAVID R. HOWARD GEORGE W. HUMANN 

B.S. Finance B.S. Marketing 




ROBERT J. HURSTAK 
B.S. Finatjce 




MICHAEL P. JOYCE 
B.S. Economics 




ROBERT B. HUTCHISON 

B.S. Accotinting 



■sff> ^ wl 




B.S. Finance 



PAUL J. KANE 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANCIS X. KEARNS 

B.S. Marketing 



358 




COLIN E. KELLIHER 

B.S. Production 



CHARLES T. KELLY 
B.S. Economics 




EUGENE T. KELLY 

B.S. Finance 




RICHARD G. KELLY 

B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS C. KENNY 
B.S. Economics 



JOHN D. KELLY 

B.S. Marketino 



359 






DOUGLAS R. KEYES 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANCIS J. KILGALLEN JOHN F. KILROY 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Business Administration 



JOHN F. KILDERRY 
B.S. Marketing 




A. COLE LANDERS MICHAEL A. LAURANO, III 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Economics 



NATHANIEL F. LADD LAURENT P. LAMBERT 

B.S. Business Administration B.S. Marketing 



360 




What did you say, Mister?" 



GERALD F. LUCEY 

B.S. Production 



EDWARD B. LYNCH 

B.S. Accounting 



361 





PETER S. LYNCH 
B.S. Marketing 



FREDERICK A. MacDONALD 
B.S. Production 




WILLIAM MacGILLIVRAY 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN P. McCABE 

B.S. Accounting 





EUGENE F. McCarthy 

B.S. Marketing 



JOHN J. McCartney 

B.S. Accounting 



"Don't choke when he asks for the I.D.' 



362 




FRANCIS J. McFARLAND JOHN K. McGILLICUDDY 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting 





EDWARD M. McGOVERN 

B.S. Accounting 



HUGH J. McLaughlin 

B.S. Finance 



PHILIP M. McLaughlin 

B.S. Marketing 



PAUL J. McNAMARA 
B.S. Economics 





HAROLD C. McNEIL 

B.S. Economics 



LAWRENCE C. McNEIL 

B.S. Business Administration 



ROBERT G. McSWEENEY 

B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS C. McTIGUE 
B.S. Finance 





THOMAS E. MAHAN 

B.S. Marketing 



JOHN P. MAHER 

B.S. Production 



363 




JOHN F. MAHON, JR. FRANCIS A. MAHONEY 

B.S. Accounting. B.S. Economics 






JAMES G. MALMO 
B.S. Finance 




EDWARD H. MASTERSON DAVID H. MAURER 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Marketing 






dm^h 



THOMAS A. MITCHELL JOSEPH MOLLICONE 

B.S. Production B.S. Finance 



RONALD N. MARTELL 
B.S. Finance 




g^ dfl 



VINCENT J MICALE ROBERT B. MITCHELL 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting 




EDWARD J. MONTMINY RICHARD D. MONTMINY 

B.S. Finance B.S. Marketing 



364 




"I'll never remember all that.' 




DONALD F. MORAN 
B.S. Accounting 




ARTHUR R. MORELLO 
B.S. Accountino 





ALBERT F. MORIARTY 
B.S. Marketing 



VINCENT A. MOULTON 
B.S. Acco7inting 



365 




RICHARD M. MULCAHY WILLIAM J. MULCAHY 

B.S. Finance B.S. Finance 




JOHN F. MULLEN 
B.S. Finance 




JAMES E. MULDOON GEORGE T. MULLALEY 

B.S. Economics B.S. Accounting 



FRANK W. MURPHY, JR. 

B.S. Finance 





JAMES G. MURPHY 
B.S. Accounting 



ROBERT J. MURPHY 

B.S. Economics 



JOhtSli 



WILLIAM J. MURPHY RAYMOND L. MUSE 

B.S. Business Administration B.S. Marketing 




THOMAS A. MUSKA 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT T. NEALON 

B.S. Accounting 



366 




JOSEPH P. O'CONNELL 

B.S. Production 




JAMES E. NELSON 
B.S. Marketing 




DONATO F. NIRO 

B.S. Accounting, 




EDWARD J. O'CONNOR 

B.S. Production 



EDWARD G. NOTTAGE ROBERT M. O'BRIEN 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Economics 



367 





til 



JOHN E. O'DONNELL 
B.S. Accounting 





JOHN M. O'NEILL 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM P. O'TOOLE 

B.S. Accounting 



CHARLES P. OLIVIERI 
B.S. Production 





JW^ 




CARL V. PERGOLA 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL E. PESCATORE 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM S. PAINE 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT J. PARK 
B.S. Marketing 






RICHARD M. PIEMONTE 
B.S. Accounting 



RAYMOND F. PIONTEK 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT M. PETIT JOHN F. PHELPS 

B.S. Finance B.S. Finance 




BRIAN J. RAFTERY 
B.S. Marketino 



EDWARD W. PYNE 

B.S. Economics 



WILLIAM D. QUIGLEY 

B.S. Marketing 



369 




RICHARD R. SAVAGE 
B.S. Production 



ROBERT P. RUMLEY 
B.S. Accounting 



BRUCE J. RYAN 
B.S. Marketing 



370 




"That's a referee , George." 





DAVID W. SCHILPP 
B.S. Marketins. 



WILLIAM E. SCHOECK 
B.S. Finance 



^^^^^k ^w^ 



WILLIAM L. SELLERS 
B.S. Marketing 




JOHN J. SEMENSI 
B.S. Marketing 



371 




JOHN F. SEVIGNY 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID M. SHEEHAN 
B.S. Economics 



^' 






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M 



VERNON F. SHERMAN 
B.S. Accounting 














RICHARD SHEPARD 

Requiescat In Pace 

1943-1964 





PAUL V. SHIBLEY 
B.S. Finance 



iiife 



ROBERT L. SHERLOCK 
B.S. Finance 




EDWARD P. SILVA VINCENT F. SMARRELLA 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Business Administration 



372 




STEPHEN A. STATUTO 
B.S. Accounting 





ROBERT P. STONEHOUSE 
B.S. Finance 



RICHARD P. STURGIS 
B.S. Finance 




LEO J. SULLIVAN, JR. 

B.S. Production 



ROBERT E. SULLIVAN 
B.S. Marketing 




WILLIAM C. SULLIVAN 

B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS E. SWEENEY LESTER M. SZARKOWSKI 

B.S. Economics B.S. Finance 



373 





KENNETH V. TACELLI 
B.S. Accounting 



GARY L. TESTA 
B.S. Finance 





JAMES L. TOMASI 
B.S. Finance 



JAN S. TONDERYS 
B.S. Marketing 



JOSEPH H. TONTODONATO 
B.S. Production 




KENNETH A. TURNER 
B.S. Accounting 



"Now this is a philosophy I'd go for.' 



374 






■y^ 



STEPHEN E. VERCOLLONE 
B.S. Finance 



MARK A. WALDRON 
B.S. Marketing 




JERRY A. VISCIONE 
B.S. Accounting 




DAVID I. WALSH, JR. 
B.S. Economics 




ANTHONY D. VORIAS 

B.S. Production 



^H9i 



FREDRIC A. VOTO 
B.S. Finance 




JOHN F. WALSH 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES C. WANSIEWICZ 

B.S. Finance 





WILLIAM WEST 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES F. WHALEN 

B.S. Marketing 



JOHN F. WEIS 
B.S. Economics 



LAURENCE K. WELCH 

B.S. Business Administration 



375 




THOMAS B. WHELAN 
B.S. Accounting 




DAVID M. WILSON 
B.S. Marketing 



RICHARD C. WHITE 
B.S. Accounting 




JOSEPH S. WILUSZ 
B.S. Finance 




FREDERICK J. WILCOX 

B.S. Accounting 



GEORGE J. WRIGHT 
B.S. Frodiiction 




JAMES A. WILLS 
B.S. Finance 




PAUL J. YELLE 

B.S. Finance 



Trick or treat? 



376 





377 




Rosemary M. Thomas, Vice President; Carole A. Tremlett, Secretary; 
Martha L. Choquette, Treasurer; Kathleen A. Keegan, President. 



378 




DIANNE M. AUCELLA 
B.S. Nursing 



ELAINE M. BOUCHER 

B.S. Nursing 




PATRICIA A. BENSON 
B.S. Nursing 




CLAIRE M. BOURQUE 

B.S. Nursing 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




MARGARET E. BIANCHI 
B.S. Nursing 




SALLY A. BISSETT 
B.S. Nursing 




CAROL A. BROWNE 
B.S. Nursing 



VIRGINIA M. BRESLIN 
B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA A. BROWNE 
B.S. Nursing 




NANCY J. BROX 
B.S. Nursing 



KAREN M. BUCHWALD 
B.S. Nursiiig 



CYNTHIA R. BURNETT 
B.S. Nursing 



379 





ANNETTE M. CALVI 
B.S. Niirsino 



MARGARET M. CAMPBELL 
B.S. Nursing 




MARTHA L. CROQUETTE 
B.S. Nursing 




MARIE E. CONTE 
B.S. Nursing 




JOAN W. COTTER 
B.S. Nursing 



BLANID F. CULLEN 
B.S. Nursing 



NADINE E. CURLEY 

B.S. Nursing 



380 





"Oooh, Jimmy! 



CLAIRE T. DOYLE 
B.S. N ursine 



DONNA M. DOYLE 
B.S. Niirsins. 




\ 



^ .!'^- 
^-j^ 



\ 



/ 




SISTER M.HELEN EDWARD, C.S.J. KATHLEEN M. DUGGAN 
B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 




KATHLEEN N. EDWARDS 
B.S. Nursing 




MARY E. EVANS 
B.S. Nursing 




381 




SUSAN R. EVANS 
B.S. Nursing 



tf>""' 






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MARGARET E. FAHEY 

B.S. Nursins, 





M. VIRGINIA FINN 
B.S. Nursing 



JEANNE M. FLYNTZ 
B.S. Nursing 




MARIE C. FORMICHELLI 
B.S. Nursing 




CATHERINE N. FRENZ 
B.S. Nursing 



B.C. ' 




GERALDINE A. GALVIN 
B.S. Nursing 



GERALDINE M. GALVIN 
B.S. Nursing 



382 




DOROTHY M. JEWELL KATHLEEN A. KEEGAN 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



BEATRICE HOWE 
B.S. Niirsitig 



JANET R. HUNT 
B.S. Nursing 



383 






GAIL ANN KENNEDY 
B.S. Nursing 




JOSEPHINE A. KNIGHT 
B.S. Nursing 



ANN M. KELLY 
B.S. Nursing 



EVELYN A. KELLY 
B.S. Nursing 




STELLA A. KOSOWICZ 
B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA A. LETKIEWICZ 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROLE A. LIUM 
B.S. Nursing 



384 




PATRICIA A. LOB AN 
B.S. Nursing 




BETH D. Mc CARROLL 
B.S. Nursing 





SHEILA A. LYNCH 
B.S. Nursing 




MARY E. McCOOL 

B.S. Niirsing 





"Step 5: Replace heart within rib cage. 





/ .. : ^V, . ^ 

SISTER WILLIAM MARY, C.S.J. ELIZABETH L. MICHALSKI 
B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



JOAN M. McGregor 

B.S. Nursing 



VIRGINIA M. MALFA 
B.S. Nursing 



385 




SUSAN J. MOYNEHAN 
B.S. Nursing 




ANN G. O'CONNOR 
B.S. Nursing 




ANN M. PIETRASZEK 
B.S. Nursing 



ELLEN J. MURPHY 
B.S. Nursing 




ELIZABETH D. O'NEILL 

B.S. Nursing 




JOANNE E. PLASSE 
B.S. Nursing 




ELAINE M. NELSON 
B.S. Nursing 



Happiness is 




JUDITH A. NISIUS 
B.S. Nursing 




386 




CLAIRE A. POLEK 
B.S. Nursing 




BRENDA A. PULTINAS 
B.S. Nursing 






SHEILA M. OUINN 
B.S. Nursing 



DIANE A. ROSS 
B.S. Nursing 




RACHEL L. SALTER 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHERINE SHANAHAN 
B.S. Nursing 





ELIZABETH R. SHEA 
B.S. Nursing 



JOYCE V. SIWINSKI 
B.S. Nursijig 



387 




NANCY E. SOUS A 
B.S. Nursing 




JUDITH A. THIBEAULT 
B.S. Nursing 




SANDRA STABILE 
B.S. Nursing 




ROSEMARY M. THOMAS 
B.S. Nursing 




PATRICIA M. SULLIVAN 
B.S. Nursing 




GAIL A. SYLVESTER 
B.S. Nursing 





BETTY A. VVAREING 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROLE A. TREMLETT 
B.S. Nursing 




CHARLOTTE E. ZALEWSKI 
B.S. Nursing 



CLAIRE M. TYRRELL 
B.S. Nursing 




389 




Eileen Callahan, President; Sally Keane, Treasurer; 
Carrol Cox, Secretary; Ann Quealy, Vice President. 



390 




HELEN ABRAHAMS 
B.S. Nursing 




MARIE F. AUCLAIR 
B.S. Nursing 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF NURSING 

r 






/ 



MARY A. BRAMBILLA 
B.S. Nursing 




MARGARET A. BARBRICK ELAINE J. BONNETTE 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



GENEVIEVE A. CHASTNEY 
B.S. Nursing 




JANICE A. COAKLEY 
B.S. Nursing 



SISTER MURIEL DESROSIERS 

B.S. Nitrsing 



CAROL DUPUIS 

B.S. Nursing 




DIANA L. DAVIDSON 

B.S. Nursing 




LUCILLE G. EMOND 
B.S. Nursing 



391 





MARGERY A. FOGARTY 
B.S. Nursino 



MARY E. GOWAN 
B.S. Nursing 






GLORIA A. HOUDE 
B.S. Nursing 




SISTER MARY IMMACULATE 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY A. HEIM 
B.S. Nursing 




PATRICIA A. HOGAN 
B.S. Nursing 




ROSE M. KARPINSKI 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHAN KENNEDY 
B.S. Nursing 




CLAUDETTE D. LAROCHELLE 
B.S. Nursing 



SISTER MARY LAURENCE, S.P. 
B.S. Nursing 



392 





NANCY M. LAWLER 
B.S. Nursing 



ANN LOGAN 
B.S. Nursing 





CAROL E. LOMBARDI 
B.S. Nursing 



CLAIRE D. MARANDA 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROLYN A. McCARTHY 
B.S. Nursing 





M. MARCIA McGUIRK 
B.S. Nursing 




B.S. Nursing. SISTER MARY MERCY, S.P. 
B.S. Niirsing 



JUSTINE A. MOxNACO 
B.S. Nursing 



393 




MARYJANE MORRIS 
B.S. Nursing 



Vitamin C from Syracuse 



394 




NINA A. MUKHERJEE 
B.S. Nursing 





ROSEMARY NOLAN 
B.S. Nursing 





PATRICIA M. NORRIS 
B.S. Nursing 




ANN G. QUEALY 
B.S. Nursing 




HELEN M. NORTH 
B.S. Nursing 




GERTRUDE T. REDMOND 
B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA A. NORTON 
B.S. Nursing 



LOUISE M. PARE 
B.S. Nursing 



"What would Dr. Casey do?" 




DOROTHY J. THIBODEAU 
B.S. Nursing 





BEVERLY E. VANESCHAK 
B.S. Nursing 




MARYANN VASOLI 
B.S. Nursing 




¥ \ 



JOANNE M. WALSH 
B.S. Nursing 



396 





397 




Mary A. Cooke, Treasurer; Sally Wojdylak, Vice President; 
James D. Sullivan, President; K. Patricia McNulty, Secretary. 



398 




ELAINE D. ANDERSON 
B.S. English 




ANNE M. BARRY 
B.S. Elementary Education 




SCHOOL OF 
EDUCATION 



GEORGE S. ANTHONY 
B.S. History 






CONCETTA M. ANTONELLIS SANDRA K. BALONEK 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education 



JOHN M. BARRY 
B.S. Mathematics 



^Ky^A 


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MAUREEN R. BRANNELLY 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MARIE-ELAINE BRESCIA 
B.S. Mathematics 





MARY E. BARYS 

B.S. French 



SHEILA E. BATTLE 
B.S. Matheinatics 




SALLY M. BRODLEY RALPH L. CADWALLADER 

B.S. Mathematics B.S. History 



399 




DAMKL J. CAFFREY 
B.S. McithenniUc^i 




ANGELO A. CARLUCCl 
B.S. Eniilish 




MAUREEN A. CONLON 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JANET E. CARROLL 
B.S. Elementary Education 




MARY A. COOKE 
B.S. Elementary Education 



ROBERT M. CAM\CHO PATRICLV .\. CAMPANA 

B.S. Eni^lish B.S. Elementary Education 





JANE F. CAVANAUGH 
B.S. Elementary Education 



JOSEPH W. CONDON 
B.S. Elementary Education 



Connie Antonellis at tlif Ahiria Hastings Scliool, Lexington. 




400 



CYNTHIA IM. COUCH 
B.S. FAementary Ediiciition 




PRISCILLA E. COX 
B.S. Elementary Education 




WILLIAM E. CROKE 
B.S. History 



E. WALLACE COYLE 
B.S. English 



DLANE i\L CRONIN 

B.S. Eleuieutarv Education 



"No«' what do vou think? 



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KATHLEEN i\L CURRAN LORRALNE i\L D'ANGELO 

B.S. Business Education B.S. English 



401 



r 




DOROTHY C. DEEDY 
B.S. History 




' Tonight I'll go with you. Tomorrow night, well 




r/ 



ROBERTA M. DeGRINNEY 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JOHN F. EYDENBERG 

B.S. English 



PAMELA A. DIX 
B.S. Mathematics 





JOHN F. DOUGHERTY MAUREEN E. EMERY 

B.S. History B.S. Elementary Education 




PETER G. FEMINO 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MARY E. FINN 
B.S. Elementary Education 



402 




^ 






PATRICIA J. FONTAINE 
B.S. Elementary Education 



JOANNE T. FRAZETTI 
B.S. History 



WANDA A. FISHER 
B.S. Elementary Education 



JUDITH M. FLANAGAN 
B.S. Elementary Education 




RICHARD F. GIBBONS 
B.S. Elementary Edtication 



Fifts', well, at least that's an improvement. " 



MIRELLA GASPAROTTO 

B.S. French 



BEVERLY A. GERMANO 
B.S. Mathematics 





GERALDINE M. GILLIGAN 

B.S. Latin 



ELLEN F. GORDON 

B.S. English 






"And what's more." 





THOMAS J. GORDON 
B.S. English 




\OREEN P. GRADY 

■ S. Elementary Education 




-^ - \ 



MARY HARRIS 

B.S. History 




GERALD A. GOVATSOS 
B.S. English 




ROSELYN L. GRAY 

B.S. Elementary Education 




REN A M. HAYES 

B.S. Elementary Education 



V. URSULA GUMULA 
B.S. Elementary Education 



BARBARA A. HARDING 
B.S. English 



404 





r ^ 




M. KAREN HOLLAND 
B.S. English 




KATHLEEN A. HOUGHTON 
B.S. English 



MARY E. HEFFERNAN 
B.S. Elementary Education 



DOROTHY H. HENTZ 

B.S. English 




HELEN J. HUGHES 
B.S. French 



JAMES G. HUSE 
B.S. French 



WILLIAM J. JACKSON 
B.S. History 




JAMES E. KEEFE 
B.S. Enslish 



"She means gormandize.' 




DONALD A. KELLEY 
B.S. History 



405 








ALICIA H. KOLEDO 

B.S. English 




LUCILLE M. LAFLAMME 
B.S. French 



JUDITH E. KELLEY 

.S. Elementary Education 



MARY M. KINGSBURY 
B.S. Elementary Education 




KATHLEEN A. LAWLER 
B.S. History 




SANDRA M. LEHTO 
B.S. History 



JEANETTE E. LEARY 
B.S. Elementary Education 




HELEN P. LOMBARDI 

B.S. Mathematics 




CAROL M. LeCLAIR 
B.S. Elementary Education 




HELEN M. LONG 
B.S. Mathematics 



RICHARD A. LEE 

B.S. Biology 



406 





MARILYN A. LONGOBARDI 
B.S. Mathematics 




fS*vt*^ 




PAUL J. LYONS 

B.S. English 






a^ 


^ 




\ 


-^ >K 




RITAJANE MacDOUGALL PAULETTE M. MacMILLAN 
B.S. English B.S. French 



RITA K. MacNEIL JACQUELYN A. McCARTHY 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Biology 



Pat McNulty, finding new neighbors. 




KATHLEEN M. McCARTHY PATRICIA A. McCARTHY 
B.S. History B.S. Elementary Education 




■/ 



u 



V 



-A\ 










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/^ 



j| MARY JANE C. McLAUGHLIN MARY C. McNAMARA 
B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education 



407 





K. PATRICIA McNULTY 
B.S. Elementary Education 



KATHLEEN V. McVARISH 
B.S. Elementary Education 








MARGARET A. MADORE TIMOTHY F. MAHONEY 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. English 



^^'■y7^"K^' <5j^ '^;K^"SJ5S?=^ ■■■''^"cH^^ 



ROBERT M. MALLON 
B.S. History 



BARBARA E. MANN 
B.S. Mathematics 



"No, that ain't spelled good. 




LINDA E. MANNIX 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JEAN M. MONTAGUE 
B.S. English 




ELIZABETH M. MARTIN 
B.S. English 




JOHN D. MOONEY 
■ S. Elementary Education 





PAUL E. MULLEN 
B.S. English 



JUDITH A. MURPHY 
B.S. Elementary Education 





MARGARET M. MURPHY 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MARILYN A. MURPHY 
B.S. English 





"You kid me not?" 



MAUREEN V. MURPHY 
B.S. Mathematics 



STEPHEN G. MURRAY 

B.S. German 





PETER E. NANNINI SHEILA A. NARCISO 

B.S. History B.S. Elementary Ediicatiott 



409 




MARIJANE V. NATALIE 
B.S. English 



AMINDA L. NICOLORO 
B.S. French 




JOANNE M. O'M ALLEY 
B.S. Elementary Education 




CAROL A. NEY 
B.S. Spanish 




JOSEPH P. NIGRO 
B.S. Bio 




"Go, Spot, go. 




MARY T. O'DONNELL 

B.S. Elementary Education 




LAURENCE J. O'NEILL 
B.S. History 




JAMES G. O'KEEFE 

B.S. History 



r 


Hi 


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1 



JOHN H. OJ{LANDELLO 

B.S. English 



JOSEPH A. PAGLIARO 

B.S. History 



410 





VICTOR E. PASSACANTILLI 
B.S. German 



RICHARD L. PAULHUS 

B.S. French 




A. PETER PROIETTI 

B.S. Enslish 



DAVID R. QUIGLEY 

B.S. English 






DONNA L. POELAERT 
B.S. English 




SHARON M. RAWSON 
B.S. English 




i 



JUDITH F. PRINCE 

.S. Elementary Education 




MAUREEN A. REILLY 
B.S. Mathematics 



"Really, I'm busy tonight." 



DIANE L. RICE 

.S. Elementary Education 



ANNE F. RICHARDSON 
B.S. Elementary Education 




411 




ARLAND J. RICHMOND 
B.S. German 




BARBARA A. RIDGE 
B.S. Latin 





KATHLEEN F. RIHA 
B.S. Business Education 




/ 



ROSEMARY E. RYAN 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JOHN E. RISGIN 
B.S. English 




JANET M. RYDER 
B.S. Elementary Education 



CLARE M. RODDY 
B.S. English 



SHEILA A. ROSSI 

.S. Elementary Education 



"What's that?" 




IRENE J. SALVI 
B.S. Elementary Education 



412 




LINDA SanMIGUEL 

.S. Elementary Education 





MARY E. SMITH 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MARY K. SPORE 
B.S. History 



MARGARET T. SKARROW 

B.S. Elementary Education 



DONNA M. SMITH 
B.S. Elementary Education 




^ A. CLAIRE STAGEY 

B.S. Elementary Education 



V 




SALLY T. STEVENS 
B.S. Elementary Education 



JAMES D. SULLIVAN 

B.S. Mathematics 



413 












THOMAS J. SULLIVAN 
B.S. English 



LINDA A. SWEENEY 
B.S. English 



PAUL J. SULLIVAN 
B.S. History 



SHEILA P. SULLIVAN 
B.S. English 



"But it's against the natural law." 




LUCIEN C. TESSIER 
B.S. French 



STEPHANIE M. THOMAS 

B.S. English 




414 




ELEANOR M. THORNTON 
B.S. History 





ALFRED C. TORREGROSSA ROBERT H. TROTTIER 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. French 



I -^ 



\ 



1 1 



SUZANNE T. TRUDEAU 
B.S. History 



MICHELE J. TUBEROSA 

B.S. Business Education 




MICHAEL P. VAUGHAN 

B.S. History 



'Dear Betty, Our new teacher is a real 



415 




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^^1 



SALLY A. WOJDYLAK 
B.S. Mathematics 




PRUDENCE M. YOUNG 
B.S. English 




MADELYNE L ZOLLO 

B.S. Mathematics 




HAROLD T. WOLFF 

B.S. History 




ANNE M. YUROF 

.S. Elementary Education 



"That's right, it should be sin2 0. 



416 




Advertising is the cornerstone of the Great American phenom- 
enon known as mass production. Without the benefit of advertis- 
ing, mass production woidd not he possible, and our industries 
woidd soon come to a screeching halt. 



Some praise advertising, some curse it, still others ignore it. 
Nevertheless, it is the mainstay of our great American economy. 

\ The following pages contain the advertising messages of our 
many friends and alumni. We don't ask you to praise this section 
of the hook, hut please do not ignore it. Read the messages, 
remember the names, and don't forget the valuable service they 
provide in producing a better hook for you. 




^ WWi(^ 



Courtesy of 

WIHS-TV 

CHANNEL 3B 

The NEW View for 
The NEW Boston 

Keep Watching In For All B.C. Sporting Events 



PATRONS 

and"" 



Xome Fly With Me' 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PATRONS 



\Mt. and Mrs. Anthony Adamic 
^Mr. and Mrs. Felix F. Albano 

Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Ali 

Mr. Erwin H. Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. F. N. Andary 

Mr. Robert A. Anderson 

Dr. Alexander T. Arthurs J 

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Arhnghaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. AuriHo, Sr. 

Mr. Lawrence P. Avery 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard J. Aylward 

Mr. Peter Baichi 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. George Baldwin^ 

Mrs. G. Barbieri 

Mr. Franklin A. Becker 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard J. BelHveau 

Mr. and Mrs. Fernand A. Bernardin 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey E. Bernier 

Mr. Richard Bisignani 

Mr. Herbert BlocI^^ 

Mr. Joseph E. Bond, '25 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred J. Boudreau 

Mr. Normand A. Bourcet 

Mr. Hilairi Bourque 

Mr. John J. Bove 

Mr. Thomas F. Boyd, Esq. 



E. P. Braley 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Breslin 

Mr. Gerard A. Brillon 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Edwin Browne 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis C. Browne 

Mr. Joseph E. Brunelle 

Mr. Edward W. Burnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Burbick 

Dr. J. Joseph Burns 

Mr. Kenneth A. Businger 

Mr. Thomas A. Cahill 

Mr. Morrison G. Cain, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony P. Camarra 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Carroll 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Capalbo 

Mr. Joseph A. Carty 

Mr. Michael A. Castelhni 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Catalano 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cavanaugh 

Mr. Alfred S? Cavaretta 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank T. Chilenski 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar R. Choquette 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. Church 

Dr. and Mrs. John R. Cicchetti 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cigas 

Mrs. Gordon C. Clarke 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent E. Cleai'f 



1 






Mr. Robert L. Clifford 

Mr. Salvador Colom 

Mr. Louis A. Comis 

Mr. John Conley 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Edward Conners 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Cotter 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Croce 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Cronin 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cronin 

Mr. Thomas J. Cudmore 

Mrs. Robert J. CuUen 

Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Daileader 

Mr. Joseph R. D'Amico 

Mrs. John DeFilippo 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Deluhery 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Delany 

Mr. Manuel DeMattia 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthonie DenUyl 

E. A. Derba j 

Audres Luis de Torres 

Mr. George A. Bidden; Jr. 

Mr. Hugh F. Doherty 

Mr. James B. Dolan 

Margaret M. Donahue 

Mr. and Mrs. James Driscoll 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Duvall 

Mr. S. John Dwyer, Sr. j 



Mr. and Mrs. Roderick J. D| 

Mr. Robert C. EUiott 

Dr. V. H. Eversgerd 

Mr. J. G. Faherty, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Farricker^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo T. Finn 

Mrs. Eileene M. Finnell 

Irene M. Foley 

Dr. and Mrs. Norman L. Fortic^ 

Dr. and Mrs, Louis A. Fuoco 

Petei: Gaihonas, D.V.M. 

Mr. Vincent P. Gallagher 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Gannon 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Gannon 

Dr. and Mrs. James F. Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. George V. Garland 

Mr. Ruben Gaztambide 

Mr. and Mrs. Gaitano Gentile 

Mr. and Mrs. Orlando J. Germano 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Gildare 

Mr. Arthur Stephen Gleas^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Goldsmith 

Mrs. Sidney J. Gopin / 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas. f. Grady 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Gramling, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Grey 

Mr. James J. Graham 





.^ 




PATRONS 



bur J. Gross 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Guarino 
Ted and Virginia Gumula 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Gutch 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Haberski 
Hollis Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Halli 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Hanna 
Mr. Harold F. Harrigan 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Hartnett 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hattauer 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Hayes 
Mr. John M. Hazlin 
Mr. Benjamin W. Heath 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Henehan 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hentz 
W. S. Herbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Hickman 
Mr. and Mrs. Christian Hoffman 
Mr. Coleman F. Hogan 
Mr. Patrick J. Hogan, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Holland 
Mr. and Mrs. George M. Hoyle 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Hurley 
Virginia Igoe 
Mr. WiUiam J. Jacquette 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Janson 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Jewell 

Mr. Robert C. Jordan 

E. J. Keeflfe 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor T. Keegan 

Mr. Daniel W. Keeler 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Kelleher 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kelleher 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Kelly 

Kelly's Prescription Drug 

Mrs. WiUiam Kelty 

Gregory P. Keltz 

Mr, and Mrs. James F. Kervick 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ketterer 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kisly 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton P. Klish 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Koledo 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kuharich 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Kulczak 

Mr. and Mrs. Casimir J^, Kurek 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. LeClair 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward U. Lee 

Mr. Thomas F. Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman E. Leen 

Mr. Robert Lennertz 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Loban 

Mr. Vincent Lopez 






^^B^PATRONS ^^H 




Mr. and Mrs. John Lorden 


Mr. and Mrs. Francis X. McGinley ^^^H 




Mr. and Mrs. Sarno Luccio 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. McGovern * 




Mr. and Mrs. George Lutz 


Mr. William McKenna, Jr. 


^^m 


Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Lydon 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. MacDonald 


Mr. James T. McLaughlin 

Mr. Peter J. McLaughUn , 
Mr. Thomas M. McLaughlin ; 
Mr. Hugh J. McMackin ' 


liHi 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Madden 
Mr. LesHe I. Madden, Sr. 


m 

1 


Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Madore 

Mr. and Mrs. Aldo Ma£Fei 

E. F. Major 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Mahoney 


Mr. John J. McNaught, '43 . 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. McNulty 

Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam E. McTague 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph X. Meehan | 


■^55^ 


Charles V. Manganelh, M.D. 


Mr. and Mrs. Leon Michalski 


hi^ 


|^ Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Mancini 


Mr. and Mrs. Andre R. Michaud :^^J§9HHH 


It 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Mangan 


Mr. James E. Miles ^'^"^wHhI^^BI 




Mr. and Mrs. S. F. Manister 

1 


Mr. and Mrs. Russell E. Millef ^^CSSfc 




„ Mr. EdwardiW. Mannix 


Mr. and Mrs. John A. Mojcher and P^^ J9|^H 


T'*" •9^ 


Mrs. L. W. Marchildon 


J. J. Molloy ^HH 


I"' 


Marian Marchini 


Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Monaco ^SSS. 




Dr. Joseph T. Marino 


Dr. and Mrs. Bertram F, Moore 'l^H^^^^ 




Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence McCabe 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Moore f^^H 


r 


Mr. James C. McCall 


Mr. Matthew M. Moriarty "^^H 


^-^ . 


Dr. Charles F. McCann 


Mr. Charles C. Morrison, Sr. ;#| 


!^g§!feis*a*;«fc'' - 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. McCann 


Mr. George Moses .^mE 




Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. McCarthy 


Mr. T. M. Mungovan ^iii|gm| 


MHM^pm^e^. and Mrs. Eugene J. McCarthy 
Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop H. McClure 


Mr. Vincent A. Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Murray 




Mr. and Mrs. Wilham F. McDonough 


Captain O. B. Nelson, U.S.N., Ret. 


™lliiiiiii 






PATRONS 




n W. Nisius 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. O'Brien 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. O'Bryan 
Lt. Col. and Mrs. James F. O'Connor 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo F. O'Connor 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. O'Hara 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Allan O'Neill 
Congressman and Mrs. Thomas P. O'Xeill, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold R. Oslin 
Mr. and Mrs. David J. O'Sullivan 
Mr. Donald W. Pabst 
Captain and Mrs. George W. Parcels 
Mr. and Mrs. Liberato Parrillo 
Mr. and Mrs. Alban J. Pelletier 
Mr. Frank J. Percarpio 
Mrs. L. J. Petrillo - 
Mr. Joseph Petrucci 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmund S. Pietraszek 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Plas^ 
Mr. and Mrs. Adam Polek 
J,: Mr. and Mrs. John W. Powell 

r. and Mrs. John F. Power 

r. and Mrs. Joseph F. Prince 

r. and Mrs. Edmund Pultina? 
Mrs. Katherine P. Radley 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman F. X. Rahill 
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Rambler 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Randall 





Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Rau, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Rawson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Raybould 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Reardon 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W. Reinhard 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Repczynski 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin K. Richardson 
Mr. and Mrs. H. O; Richardson 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Riehl 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis A. Riha, '26 
Mr. Paul W. Riley 
Mr. Stephen J. Riordan 
Mr. John Rossi 

Rotondi Construction Company 
Mr. Jacob L. Rudd 
Mr. Fred W. Rusiecki 
Mr. and Mrs. Leland G. Ryan 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Ryan 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ryan 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Salter. 
-, Mr. and Mrs. Charles X. Sampson 
r. Martin Sarkisian 
r. and Mrs. Raymond M. Sarno 
Salvatore Scelso, M.D. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Schail 
Mr. William A. Schmidt 
Mr. Samuel J. Schoenfeid 
Mr. Salvatore Scimone 




^-V _v^ 



y 



Mr. and Mrs. StcpKen A. Scimone 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Selgrade 
Mr. Dudley R. Shallcross 
Mr. and Mrs. George E. E. Shea 
Mr. MicliaeJ J. Shea 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Shores 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis Simon 
Dr. and Mrs. Gebrge A. Sirignano 
Mr. Charles E. Smith 
i Mr. and Mrs. Elbridge 11. Smith 
Dr. and Mrs. A. Snieska 
Mr. and Mrs. Dale Spanglcr 
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick R. Stabile 
Mr. Tames I . Stanton, '42 - » 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Stanton 
Mrs. Edv\ard C . Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Stetz 
Mrs. Aldora Stronaeh 
Mr. Daniel F. Sulli\an 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Sullivan 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E, SuUivan 
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Sweeriey, Sr. 
VIr. Frank E. Ta\Ior 
Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas P. Teresi 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Roy Thompson, ]r. 
Mr. and .Mrs. George P. Toll 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Tonsmeire 
Traverse Insurance Agency 





r. and Mrs. WalteriP. Tremfett 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Trudearf 
Mr. and Mrs. Roland H. Trudel 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Edmund Trumbour 
Mrs. Michael Tuberosa 
Mr. and Mrs. Robeit H. Tuley 
Mr. and Mrs. Josepli W. Tulis 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Via\attenc 
Mr. Francis A. Vitello 
Mr. Jose Guillcrmo \'ivas 
Mr. William L. Walsh' ^ ' 
Mr. and Mrs. John A.Ward 
Mrs. James Wareing 
Mrs. Norman A. Welch 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Weitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley V. Wells 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Werdell 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. Wheeler 
Dr. and Mrs. Edmund L. Whelan 
Mr, Charles M.Wiker 
Mr. Leroy Z. Wisler 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold O. Wolff 
Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Wontrobs' 
Captain Harry Joseph Wunderlich 
Mr. Albert J. Young 
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Yutzy 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter J, Zammuto, Sr 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Zaikowski 
Dr. Gene J. Zaino 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC. 



24 School Street 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, SR., 1930 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, 1955 



BARNES & NOBLE 



INC. of MASS. 



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UN 4-0640 










There are few earthly things 
more splendid than a Uni- 
versity. In these days of 
broken frontiers and collaps- 
ing values — v/hen every 
future looks somev/hat grim, 
and every ancient foothold 
has become something of a 
quaymire, wherever a Univer- 
sity stands, it stands and 
shines; wherever it exists, the 
free minds of men, urged 
on to full and fair inquiry, 
may still bring wisdom into 
human affairs. 

— JOHN MASEFIELD 




CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1965 



THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT 



J. H. McNAMARA, INC. 

READY MIX CONCRETE 

SAND, GRAVEL and ROOFING GRAVEL 

298 NORTH HARVARD STREET 

ALLSTON, MASS. 

STadium 2-33 50 

TW 3-7562 



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ELECTRIC COMPANY 



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SULLIVAN D.C. & CO., INC. 



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•^ 

»*>*■« 

,>i. 



f^'l 



ui 





Compliments of 
a friend 



Congratulations to the 



Class of 1965 



BOSTON COLLEGE DRAMATIC SOCIETY 

Celebrating Its 98th Season 







CO 6-0222 


RUBY 


NEWMAN 


ORCHESTRAS 


400 


Commonwealth Avenue 




BOSTON, 


MASS. 


BILL CROSBY 


RUBY NEWMAN 



With best wishes to the 



Class of 1965 



The University Chorale of 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1965 

from 

THE OLD VIENNA HOFBRAU 

Music by the Famous 
HOFBRAU ORCHESTRA 

SINGING WAITERS 

Specializing in Parties and Banquets 
Showers - Weddings - Anniversaries 

Tlie Home of the B. C. Special 

1314 Commonwealth Avenue 
ALLSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

232-8748 
John Helper, Manager 




Fdirfield & Ellis 




^^. 



SIXTY CONGRESS STREET 

BOSTON 

NEW YORK • MONTREAL • TORONTO 



Best of Luck in the Future 

from 

The Student Senate 

College of Arts and Sciences 



John J. GriflRn 

Chairman 

Douglas Mello 

Treasurer 



Thomas Garvin 

Historian 

John R. O'Malley 

Parliamentarian 





Courtesy of 

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The NEW View for 
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Keep Watching In For All B.C. Sporting Events 



The best 




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FUGAZY 
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488 MADISON AVE ■ NY 22 NY ■ PL 1-3434 



OFFICES IN MAJOR CITIES fi WORLD CAPITALS 



MARR COMPANIES 

25 D STREET, SOUTH BOSTON, MASS. 
ANdrew 8-1660 




MARR SCAFFOLDING CO. 
Sales and Rentals 



MARR EQUIPMENT CORP. 
Truck Crane Rentals 



Come 
Mivel 

You're 
in the 




I 



Generation 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



ALLIED UNIFORM COMPANY 

260 Dover Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02118 

LI 2-9600 

Outfitters of Boston College R.O.T.C. 

Attention GRADUATING SENIORS: 

See Us for Your Uniform Needs and Accessories 
on Going Into Active Service 



Compliments 

of 
A Friend 



CONGRATULATIONS 



and 



BEST WISHES 



to the 



CLASS of 1965 



From the 



BOSTON COLLEGE EAGLES' BAND 



CONGRATULA TIONS 
FROM CHESTNUT HILL'S 
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E. J. REMPELAKIS A. I. A. 

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AND FILM CENTER 

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Theology, Philosophy, Papal Teachings, Liturgy; 

Biographies, Autobiographies, Lives of Saints. 

Meditation & Spiritual Reading Books, and other outstanding 
Catholic Best Sellers. 

Children's Story and Coloring Books. 

16 mm Films, Filmstrips, Religious Art. 



172 Tremont St. 

Boston, Mass. 

Ha 6-5464 




381 Dorchester St. 

So. Boston, Mass. 

An 8-8811 



Discount to Clergy and Religious 



HIGHAM, NEILSON, 
WHITRIDGE & REID, INC. 

1 3 1 State Street 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Designer and Administrator of 
YOUR STUDENT INSURANCE PROGRAM 

Serviced Locally by 
CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC. 

24 School St. 
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BEST WISHES 

to the 
CLASS OF 1964 



SULLIVAN BROS. 



PRINTERS 



LOWELL 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 





^jj,j;,^jj-^».^5«lt^^ 



t iIhii„ nnn 



a , 1.16 

nnn^ niiiii nn 






ana- jiiH^A 

lll%ll|r'||| III 

m mi!! iwn mi ;i j^ 

no {HSn ailR »RR IRBB HIS 

HB, itnu: nun ish 

|Pe;5f{ Wishes to the 



College Of Busihess Administration ■ ■-m,,<m^!,'>,,0 im ms! m !m mm 
Itudeht Senate 



:^ 




Compliments of A Friend 





SBeU ^ii4A€<^ io 


^ve ^Itiekia/in^ ^/a^^ 


TRADE COMPOSITION CO., INC 


Sfu/ica^^i^Ae^^ 




GARDEN CITY GRAVEL CORPORATION 

Radio Dispatched Service 

Shovel & Rubber Tire Loader Rental 

Sand • Gravel • Fill • Loam • Peat • Stone 

Church Street 
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Telephone TW 4-1174 
If No Answer Call TW 7-8502 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 365, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Owner: Louis W. Marinelli 







Best Wishes From 

l00ton Qlnlbgr (Enunril 5Z7^ 
2Cntgl|ta of OIolumhuH 

Matt Soldano Bill Rooney 
Grand Knight Warden 

Frank McFarland Pete Brady 
Deputy Grand Knight Financial Secretary 

Bill Reilley Bill MacGillivray 
Chancellor Treasurer 

And Its More Than 400 Brothers! 


1 








i^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 







E. T. RYAN IRON 
WORKS, INC. 

1027 Turnpike Street 
CANTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Ornamental Iron 

Aluminum 

Bronze 



The Beaconsf ield Hotel 



{Five Minutes From College) 



T.V. - Air-Conditioned - Swimming Pool 



SPECIAL STUDENT RATES 



1731 Beacon St. 



Brookline, Mass. 



AS 7-6800 




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S. S. PIERCE 



Stores in Boston, Belmont, Wellesley, Northshore, 
Brookline, Newton, Chestnut Hill, West Hartford 



PARTIES ARE MORE FUN 



AT 




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^^2^/ 



INCORPORATED 



Letterpress * Offset • Thermography 

Complete 
Printing Service 

59 McBride Street JAMAICA PLAIN 

JAmaica 4-0203 



Greater Boston's No. 1 Ford Dealer 
In Sales and Service 



ELBERY MOTOR CO., INC. 

Ford — Fairlane 

Falcon — Thunderbird 

Mustang 

Sales — Service 

360 River Street Cambrid 

Near Memorial and Storrow Drives 

At Cambridge Exit — Mass. Turnpike 

Dial KI 7-3820 



Catering to the Automotive Requirements of B.C. Stu- 
dents, Faculty, Alumni and Friends For Over 36 years. 



THE REGISTERED NURSE STUDENT SENATE 

extends their 

Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to 

THE CLASS of 1965 




fc^ 




i^W WWW i'TH WJ¥ ifWW i.ar.—'- -"* 

iii-jil ItsLlllJiiiLli^vlS 




^BBi 



aSaifJF. 



«-«--- '■■■■■■IIIIBL. „_, 

■SiSSSSSinnrn-nrirBwi 




S 9 S B Sii!S!Si!!!EMi!il!!Si!!!!!S!!!!!!!lBffi!^ 



ALLEN STATIONERY CO. 



171 A Massachusetts Avenue BOSTON 



KE 6-1171 



"COMPLETE OFFICE EQUIPMENT" 



PRINTING— TYPEWRITERS— ADDING MACHINES 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



REARDON AND TURNER 

150 Cause-way Street 
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Registered 

Professional Engineers 

Building Services 



The Edward S. Quirk Co. Inc. 

Distributors of GENERAL Tires and Tubes 

275 ARSENAL STREET, WATERTOWN 72, MASS. 

WORCESTER OFFICE 
Bowker, Hamblin, Quirk, Inc. • 315 Grove Street • Pleasant 2-2817 



Recapping • Radio Equipped Trucks * Vulcanizing 



"TF 



m - 



Ji?F 






ttlSi& 



i!^ 



3 .'^v"-'; 



-■■»> 



/t; 






-ir-^ 



Ha:-!:; I . 



fy^\ 



mi 









t3C3 
E3U 

csts 



'"BJ^.Ka 






.3&(#li: 



David H. Leahy 



John F. Leahy 



BOSTON TEXTILE CO. 

INSTITUTIONAL 

DRY GOODS 



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Telephone Liberty 2-8630 



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JOHN C. ALVORD 



Registered Pharmacist 



PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 



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Phone Blgelow 4-0760 



Radio Boston 

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is pleased to broadcast 

Boston College 

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Football 

in cooperation with our 

fine sponsors 




SYLVANIA LIGHTING DIVISION 




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BOSTON CAB COMPANY 




KEnmore 6-5010 




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Boston Cab KEnmore 


6-5010 


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2-5500 


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2-2000 


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CO 6-0222 



RUBY NEWMAN ORCHESTRAS 



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BOSTON, MASS. 



BILL CROSBY RUBY NEWMAN 



DIMOND-UNION STAMP WORKS 



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Tel. 423-2900 



Established 1840 



Tallihc',6 



CHESTNUT HILL 

(Opposite Shopping Center) 

for a 
Delightful Luncheon and Dinner 

Organ Music Nightly in Our Club Lounge 

FRANK B. TALLINO, B.C. '30 

Tel. BE 2-1749 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



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SERVICE 
WITH A 



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T 



WCOP provides service with a smile — plus more music, more news, more 
often, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! For example, time and temperature is 
broadcast every three minutes; complete weather, every fifteen minutes; news 
every half hour (every fifteen minutes in the morning) ; not sometimes — not 
only when we feel like it, but consistently and around the clock. We also 
program more adult popular music each and every hour than any other major 
station in America. This flow of vital environmental information is augmented 
by frequent sports reports under the direction of Dick Radatz, our Sports 
Director, and Financial Reports featuring the Boston Herald's William F. 
Homer. It's all served up with you in mind AND with a smile. 
Write to WCOP — Copley Square, Boston; and we'll be happy to send you 
a "Service With a Smile" button. 



// 



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// 









m^Wt^^tfm^h^ 


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i 1 1 1. 




B. L. MAKEPEACE, INC. 


Engineers Equipment • Drafting Materials 


Keuffel & EssER • Hamilton 


Photostating • Blueprinting • Plan Reproductions 


1266 Boylston Street BOSTON 15, MASS. 


COpley 7-2700 






Exclusive Metropolitan Boston Agent 

AERO MAYFLOWER TRANSIT 
COMPANY, INC. 

World-Wide Service 

3175 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 30, MASS. 

HAncock 6-8000 JAmaica 2-3300 — 828-2860 

OLympic 3-0400 Pioneer 4-1820 



Bob Dunn, '42 



Dan Dunn, '42 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1965 

From 

the book store 
Mcelroy commons • boston college 



THE BOOKSTORE IS A TRUE ACADEMIC BRANCH OF ANY UNIVERSITY 

Textbooks • Required and Recommended 

Paperbacks From All Publishers • Reference Books 

Sportswear • Jewelry • Stationery • Glassware 

Greeting Cards • Book Ends • Supplies 

Health and Beauty Aids • Prints of Famous Paintings 

Boston College Songs Recorded by the University Chorale 

Classical & Popular Records 



GIFT ITEMS FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 
ALL IMPRINTED WITH THE B.C. CREST 



Lamps Ceramic Coffee & Tea Set 

(five pieces) 

Campus Gift Tray 

.- . « '^esk Sets 

Cigarette Music Box 

Deslc Clock Ash Trays 

Scrap Books Glasses 

(Various sizes, styles) 

Silver-Rimmed Glasses 

Campus Pillow 

College Pets Song Books 



H. C. W^IXWRIGHT ^ CO. 

Established 1868 

Members 
Boston and New York Stock Exchanges 

EWESTMENT SECURITIES 



60 State Street 
Boston 



Salem, Mass. 
Framingham, Mass. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Providence, R.I. 



1 20 Broadway 
New York 



Portland, Maine 
Lewiston, Maine 
Manchester, N.H. 
Keene, N.H. 



THE STUDENT SENATE 



of the 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



School of Education 



Extends Its Congratulations 



to the 1965 



GRADUATING CLASS 



of 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



TYPEWRITERS — ADDING MACHINES 
Rented 

Sold 

Repaired 
PETER PAUL 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

1 1 PINE STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 
TW 3-8920 



REPOINTING AND WATERPROOFING 

LEAKING MASONRY WALLS 

ABOVE GROUND 

CONCRETE RESTORATION 

MASONRY RESTORATION 

BUILDING CLEANING 

BIRDPROOFING 



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BOSTON 02118 NEW YORK 10017 

ALBANY 12201 




*^oJnpiitnents of 
A FRIEND 



The 



MARSHARD ORCHESTRAS 



The Outstanding Favorite of 



America's Universities 



73 Newbury Street, Boston New York 



KEnmore 6-5173 



Bar Harbor 



TO THE BOSTON COLLEGE 



CLASS OF '65 



OUR VERY BEST WISHES NOW 

AND FOR THE FUTURE 

THE SHERATON-PLAZA 

BOSTON 



H. de F. "DAN" NYBOE 
GENERAL MANAGER 



"The purpose of the Campus Council is to foster and promote the academic, cultural, spiritual, and physical 
welfare of the student body as a whole." 



John Hodgman 
Chairman 



Jeanne Flyntz 
Vice-Chairman 



From Constitution of Campus Council 



David Sheehan 
Treasurer 



Marie Brescia 
Secretary 



/ 



ir'fr?^!^ 




■'* M' 







Compliments of 

THE BOSTON COLLEGE 

COUNCIL OF RESIDENT MEN 



tg^ 







Courtesy of 

WIHS-TV 

CHANNEL 38 

The NEW View for 
The NEW Boston 

Keep Watching In For All B.C. Sporting Events 




Compliments 



of the 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



RINGS 




PINS 
MEDALS 


excellent 


CHARMS 


design. 


CUPS 


skilled 


PLAQUES 
TROPHIES 


craftsmanship, 
superb 




quality. 


I 

YOUR CLASS JEWELER 


DIEGES & CLUST 


226 PUBLIC ST., PROVIDENCE, R. 1. 


NEW YORK . PHILADELPHIA 


MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 



Best Wishes 
from 

VALLE'S STEAK HOUSE 
ROUTE 9 CHESTNUT HILL NEWTON 

Famous 1-Lb. Broiled 

SIRLOIN STEAK $2.95 

EVERY WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY SPECIAL 

TWO I -LB. MAINE LOBSTERS . . . $2.95 
Broiled, Boiled, or Baked Stuffed 

CHOICE OF MANY COMPLETE DINNERS 

Including Prime Rib Roast of Beef 

$1.95 to $2.95 



COMPLETE LUNCHEONS 



95c to $L35 




ALLES 



STEAK HOUSE 



NEWTON • Open 7 AM — 1 AM 



WO 9-9160 



Best Wishes 
from the 

ROTC BRIGADE 

and the 

Department of Military Science 
BOSTON COLLEGE 



On the occasion of its Golden Jubilee, 1915-1965 



THE PHILOMATHEIA CLUB 



Ladies Auxiliary to Boston College, 

extends its best wishes to the student body of 

Boston College 



Mrs. Vincent P. Roberts, President 



Rev. John J. Murphy, S.J., Moderator 




Compliments of 
friend 




If 



ISi iaBbi. Bmn hhI' 

^.i^S;ji»*-;l!|.!Hiiim 
t-- Lisin?..lH-i;i sii-iJL! 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

PAUL E. P. BURNS CO., INC. 

316 Summer Street 
Boston 10, Mass. 

ACADEMIC CAPS, GOWNS AND HOODS, CHOIR ROBES 

AND ACCESSORIES 

FOR SALE AND RENTAL 

LI 2-1513 LI 2-1514 

Paul E. P. Burns, '53 




NOW THE TRUMPET SUMMONS US AGAIN - NOT AS A CALL TO BEAR 
ARMS, THOUGH ARMS WE NEED; NOT AS A CALL TO BATTLE, THOUGH 
EMBATTLED WE ARE; BUT A CALL TO BEAR THE BURDEN OF A LONG 
TWILIGHT STRUGGLE, YEAR IN, AND YEAR OUT, "REJOICING IN HOPE, 
PATIENT IN TRIBULATION" - A STRUGGLE AGAINST THE COMMON 
ENEMIES OF MAN: TYRANNY, POVERTY, DISEASE, AND WAR ITSELF. 

John F. Kennedy Inaugural Address January 20, 1961 



A message to the class of 1965 from seven Boston College graduates and the company they serve. 











METROPOLITAN PETROLEUM 



ROBERT F. LARKIN '51 
Sales Representative 



JOHN F. SULLIVAN '59 
Sales Representative 



FRANCIS J. O'REILLY '59 
Sales Representative 



METROPOLITAN PETROLEUM COMPANY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



A DIVISION OF THE PITTSTON COMPANY 




Best Wishes to the 

Class of 1965 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



JOHN F. CLUNAN 

NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

"Member of 1965 Million Dollar Round Table" 
Specializing in Estate Planning and Life Insurance 

Bus.: HUbbard 2-4900 
Res.: NOrmandy 5-3314 



75 Federal Street 
16 Glendower Rd. 



Boston, Mass. 
Melrose, Mass. 





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SAVINGS 




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ACCOUNTS 




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Newton 


Waltham Wayland 
Member F.D.I.C. 


Weston 



Liberty 2-5252 








rv/aunce 


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Co. 




DRAPERIES 






85 ESSEX STREET BOSTON 11, 


MASS. 



Welcome 

Class of 1965 

To The 

BOSTON COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Chestnut Hill, 
Massachusetts 




iaca^^-?-^s- 



itions to ilie 
"-ClSs^iof 1965 
DELTA KAPPA CHAPTER 

of 
DELTA SIGMA PI 

Professional Commerce and Business 
Administration Fraternity 



THE 

WARREN KAY YANTINE 

STUDIO, INC. 

OFFICIALLY SERVING 
THE 1965 
SUB TURRI 



TERRACE MOTEL 

75 AIR-CONDITIONED UNITS 

FREE TV AND PARKING 

FAMILY PLAN 

RECOMMENDED AAA - ALA 

MEMBER SUPERIOR MOTELS, INC. 

Convenient To Boston College 

1650 Commonwealth Avenue 
Brighton — Tel. 566-6260 



HOME SUPPLY CO. 

HARDWARE • PAINTS • WALLPAPER 
LINOLEUMS 

366 Washington Street 

BRIGHTON, MASS. 

STadium 2-0240 
ELI SOKOLOVE 



HOWLAND LINEN SUPPLY CO. 
INCORPORATED 



40 Bristol Street 

BOSTON 18, MASS. 

HAncock 6-6630 



73 Chancery Street 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

WYman 2-4981 



Corner Rt. No. 28 and Bearse's Way 

HYANNIS, MASS. 

spring 5-2245 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



AHEARN, James J. 

126 Hale St., Beverly, Mass. 

p. 293 

AMIRAULT, David B. 

88 Stedman St., Quincy, Mass. 

p. 293, 312 

ANDERSON, Jo Jr. 

6 Wilson Street, Rochester, N. H. 
p. 90, 293 

ANSTEY, Robert L. 

11 Brookdale Rd., Natick, Mass. 

ARMBRUST, Joseph W. 

495 Pickett St., Alexandria, Va. 

p. 247, 269, 293 

AYLWARD, Howard J. 

410 Diehnon Road, St. Louis, Mo. 

p. 293 

AZULAY, Ricardo K. 

51 Aldrick St., Roslindale, Mass. 

BACIGALUPO, Walter A. 

7 Humbolt Ave., Burlington, Mass. 
p. 293 

BAILEY, Peter A. 

110 Watson Road, Belmont, Mass. 

p. 293 

BALIZET, Louis B. 
39 Broad, Hatboro, Pa. 
p. 293 

BARNARD, Warren E. 

16 Latin Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 293 

BEATRICE, Kenneth E. 

38 Warren St., W. Medford, Mass. 

p. 15, 293 

BELIVEAU, Raymond H. 
128 Franklin St., Lynn, Mass. 
p. 293 

BERESTECKI, Philip P. 

87 Wood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

BERGIN, Paul D. 

56 Adams St., Norwood, Mass. 

p. 293 

BERGON, Frank A. 

24506 Avenue 11, Madera, Gal. 

p. 120, 258 

BEVIL, Ronald A. 

4390 Lorcom Lane, Arlington, Va. 



BIATECKI, Joseph A. 

34 Anderson St., Boston, Mass. 

p. 294 

BIGOS, Stanley T. 

228 Pearl St., Thompson ville. Conn. 

p. 294, 315 

BOLOGNINI, Joseph N. 

731 Park Ave., Hoboken, N. J. 

p. 294 

BONNER, Hueh P. 

116 Flintlock Road, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

p. 294 

BORTOLOT, Victor J. 

30 Forbell Dr., Norwalk, Conn. 

p. 113, 294 

BOURQUE, Norman R. 

79 Oliver St., Southbridge, Mass. 

p. 294 

BOWERS, Steven P. 

451 Birch Street, West Hempstead, N. Y. 

p. 294 

BRABEC, Jeffrey J. 

33 East End Ave., New York, N. Y. 

p. 294 

BRABEC, Todd W. 

33 East End Ave., New York, N. Y. 

p. 294 

BREEN, Edward J. 

9 New Meadow Rd., Lynnfield, Mass. 

p. 5, 206, 207, 240, 241, 294 

BROCK, John J. 

413 Medford St., Maiden, Mass. 

p. 294 

BRODERICK, Gerald F. 

11 Groveland Street, Mattapan, Mass. 

BROWNE, John T. Jr. 

Rolling Acres Rd., Lunenburg, Mass. 

p. 99, 294 

BRYANT, Jay W. 

13 Skahan Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 295 

BUKER, Ceroid A. 

25 Windermere Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 295 

BURGOYNE, J. Albert 

20 Emerson Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

p. 295 



BURKE, Eugene F. 

16 Greenview Way, Up. Montclair, N. J. 

p. 295 

BYLEBYL, Jerome J. 

239 Christiana St., N. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

p. 295 

CAFARELLI, Nicholas J. 

51 Eldred St., Lexington, Mass. 

CAIL, Harold F. 
169 Franklin St., Newton, Mass. 
p. 295 

CALABRIA, Paul E. 

892 N. William St., Baldwin, N. Y. 

p. 248, 296, 299 

CANNIFF, Nelson J. 

15 Adams St., Norwood, Mass. 

p. 100, 296 

CAREY, Thomas 

21 Westwood Rd., Shrewsbury, Mass. 

p. 296 

CARRARA, Antonio F. 

18 Wolcott St., Medford, Mass. 

p. 296 

CARROLL, John J. 

116 Wicklow Ave., Medford, Mass. 

p. 296 

CARUSO, Michael G. 

38-08 149th PL, Flushing Queens, N. Y. 

p. 296 

CASEY, Joseph W. 

5 Howes St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 296 

CASEY, Philip J. 

18 Bonmar Cr., Auburndale, Mass. 

p. 296 

CASHMAN, Edward J. 

618 Park Ave., EHzabeth, N. J. 

p. 297, 312 

CELONA, Florindo J. 

1096 Bennington St., E. Boston, Mass. 

p. 297, 321 

CHABOT, Paul L. 

77 Oakland Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 297 

CIARDELLO, Victor F. 

43 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 

p. 249, 297 



CI ARKF, Richard II. 

80 Kl-IIo^u Axcnuc, Amherst, Mass. 

p. 227. 2^7 

Cr FMENT, Richard F, 

I I Tanayer Rd., Tcwksbiirv, AFass. 

p. 297 

COAKLFY, Gcorse J. 

124 Bravton Rd., Rriuhton, Afass. 

p. 100, 24S, 297, ^24 

C:OLLIi\S, 1. Stephen 

28 Flillview Rd., S. Hraintree, Mass. 

p. 297 

COLLINS, John T. 

39 Fairmount .\\e., Wakefield, iMass. 

p. 298, 332 

COLLINS, Walter R. 

16 Hopedale Street, Allston, Mass. 

COLUCCI, Stephen R. 

151 Roekaway Ave., Garden City, N. Y. 

p. 298 

COMEAUX, George E. 

2206 Louisiana St., Baytown, Tex. 

p. 118, 290, 298 

COMPA, Paul B. 

242 Webb Ave., River Edge, N. J. 

p. 298 

CONLEY, David P. 

70 Buena Vista Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 298 

CONLON, Brian P. 

50 Turner St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 107, 121, 298 

CONNELLY, Paul J. 

24 Gerrv Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

p. 100,' 101, 228, 298 

CONNOLLY, Michael J. 
9 Capen St., Milton, Mass. 
p. 298 

CONNOLLY, Michael J. Jr. 

3 5 Packard Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 298 

CONNOLLY, Paul E. 

28 Lowell St., Woburn, Mass. 

CONNOR, John M. 

157 S. Main St., Mansfield, Mass. 

p. 299 

CONNOR, John P. 

24 Crest«ood Circle, Norwood, Mass. 

p. 299 

CONWAY, Thomas J. 

98 Fletcher St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 299 



CORBETT, William P. 

20 Virginia Terr., Lynn, Mass. 

COREY, Charles A. 

10 Regent St., W. Newton, Mass. 

p. 299 

CORMIER, Roger R. 

4 5 Grant St., Gardner, Mass. 

p. 299 

COSTELLO, Thomas M. 

20 Montvale St., Roshndale, Mass. 

p. 299 

COULOMBE, George L. 

751 St. James Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

p. 299 

COWAN, Robert B. 

862 Hillcrest Rd., Ridgewood, N. J. 

p. 299 

CREEDEN, John J. 

42 Undfrwood Pk., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 300 

CREMIN, Richard T. 

1630 Winford Rd.. Baltimore, Md. 

p. 184, 193, 300 

CROWLEY, John L. 

52 Morse Ave., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 300 

CULLEN, Richard L. 

81 Gardner St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 100, 101, 300 

CUNNIFFE, Martin J. 

87 West St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
p. 300 

CURLEY, James M. 

12 George St., Tenafly, N. J. 

p. 300 

CURLEY, Matthew J. 

141 North Broad St., Norwich, N. Y. 

p. 300 

CURRAN, Allan T. 

234 Ridge St., Fall River, Mass. 

CUTCLIFFE, Joseph G. 

83 Chittick Rd., Hvde Park, Mass. 

p. 100, 101, 300 

DALTON, Allen W. 

136 Jericho Turnpike, Mineola, L. I., N. Y. 

p. 301 

DALTON, Kenneth V. 

15 Summer St., Weymouth, Mass. 

DANESCO, Michael J. 

88 Bailev Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
p. 301 

DE COSTE, Albert W. 

5 Orange Street, Roslindale, Mass. 



DELANEY, Richard T. 

6 Burt St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 301 

DELCOL, Robert E. 

2033 Central Rd., Fort Lee, N. J. 

p. 301 

DELSIGNORE, Robert P. 

12 Imperial Rd., Worcester, Mass. 
p. 193, 301 

DEMAYO, Robert F. 

76 Mar^•cl Road, New Haven, Conn. 

DERAMO, Edward D. 

51 Suffolk Ave., Revere, Mass. 

p. 301 

DESIMONE, Christopher 

117 Hudson St., Somervillc, Mass. 
p. 301 

DEVIN. James E. 

13 Stafford St., Roxbury, Mass. 

DIC70K, Paul D. 

118 Wood Ter., Leona, N. J. 

DIFEO, Joseph C. 

92 Gilford Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 
p. 268, 301 

DIMATTIA, Arthur F. 

719 Washington St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 301 

DIMAURO, Ronald J. 

4 Church St., Rocky Hill, Conn. 

DIMOND, Paul K. 

10 Basto Ter., Roshndale, Mass. 

p. 115, 118, 301 

DINUBLIA, John J. 

897 Belmont St., Watertown, Mass. 

DOBRZYNSKI, Robert F. 

3764 St. Paul Blvd., Rochester, N. Y. 

p. 230, 301, 332 

DOHERTY, Kevin E. 

86 Linden St., Allston, Mass. 

DOLAN, Jean G. 

93 Sanderson Ave., Dedham, Mass. 
p. 301 

DONNELLY, Kevin J. 

9 Forbes St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
p. 302 

DONNELLY, Paul 

12 Mason St., Medford, Mass. 

p. 302 

DOODY, Louis P. 

87 Wompatuck Rd., Hingham, Mass. 
p. 302 



DOWNEY, Paul E. 

13 5 Woodlawn St., Lynn, Mass. 

p. 302 

DOYLE, Allen F. 

15 Oak Hill Rd., Braintree, Mass. 

p. 302 

DOYLE, Dennis T. 

25 Jennings Rd., White Plains, N. Y. 

p. 247, 302 

DRISCOLL, Mark J. 

4 North Ave., Norwood, Mass. 

p. 302 

DUFFLY, Paul R. Jr. 

71 High St., Canton, Mass. 

p. 302 

DUFFY, Philip G. 

88 Denver St., Saugus, Mass. 

p. 303 

DULLEA, Gerard J. 

67 Blue Hill Terrace, Milton, Mass. 

p. 102, 303, 323 

DUMAS, Joseph S. 

47 Park Vale Avenue, Allston, Mass. 

p. 303 

DUNLANY, William S. 

186 Park St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 303 

EASTON, Edward J. 

31 Dupont Circle, Brockton, Mass. 

p. 303 

EATON, Richard J. 

4 Agassiz Park, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
p. 303 

ECKHARD, Frederic G. 

5 Arcadia Court, Bloomfield, N. J. 
p. 303 

ECKLOFF, James C. 

4412 Highland Ave., Bethcsda, Md. 

p. 303 

EDGAR, Peter M. 

119 Hunterdon Blvd., Murray Hill, N. J. 

EZHAYA, Joseph B. 

17 Temple St., Waterville, Me. 

p. 98, 304 

FEDELE, John E. 

61 Boston St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 304 

FEENEY, James H. 

East Cross Rd., Springdale, Conn. 

p. 304 

FEENEY, John J. 

36 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FELL, Richard N. 

13 Davida Rd., Burlington, Mass. 

p. 304 



FERRIS, William V. 

61 Dolphin Ave., Revere, Mass. 

p. 304 

FITZGERALD, Thomas K. 
29 Locke St., Arhngton, Mass. 
p. 304 

FITZGERALD, William M. 

21 Pequossette Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 304 

FLAHERTY, Peter E. 

94 Gulliver St., Milton, Mass. 

p. 197, 207 

FLYNN, Kevin P. 

46 Dover St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 304 

FLYNN, Michael F. 

548 Heath St., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

p. 304 

FORD, Joseph D. 

183 Pauhne Street, Winthrop, Mass. 

p. 304 

FORD, Paul B. 

20 Lollcr Rd., Hamden, Conn. 

p. 247, 276, 304 

FORSTER, Jeffrey J. 

46 Francis St., Boston, Mass. 

FOX, David W. 

23 5 Edgewood Street, Stratford, Conn, 
p. 304^ 

FRAHER, Thomas F. 

391 La Grange St., W. Ro.xbury, Mass. 

p. 304 

FREIJE, George F. 

52 86th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 305 

FURBUSH, Robert C. 

26 Bovnton St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 213, 217, 220, 234, 249, 305, 

GADBOIS, James J. 

20 Rosaria St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 305 

GALLIGAN, John H. 
Route 1, Wells, Me. 

GARVIN, Thomas D. 

3 Silloway St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 84, 100, 291, 292, 305 

GAVIN, David R. 

3 West Hill Terrace, Melrose, Mass. 

p. 305 

GAVLICK, Thomas J. 
Winthrop Dr., Attleboro, Mass. 
p. 105, 305 

GERAGHTY, Paul L. 

28 Woodglcn Rd., Hyde Park, Mass. 

p. 305 



GERVASI, Frederick A. 

223 Beach St., Quincv, Mass. 

p. 306 

GIANTURCO, Nicholas D. 

140 Garfield Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 306 

GIFFUNI, Vincent O. 

20 Cranford St., Forest Hills, N. Y. 

p. 108, 247, 306 

GILVEY, Robert W. 

10 Huron Avenue, Jcrsev City, N. J. 
p. 122, 126, 228, 306 

GINGERELLI, George M. 

1 1 Edgewood Dr., Holdcn, Mass. 
p. 249, 306 

GLEASON, Walter J. 

73 Carroll St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 306 

GORMELY, Bruce D. 

16 Ox Yoke Lane, Norwalk, Conn. 

p. 127, 306 

GORMLEY, lames F. 

86 Berwick PL, Norwood, Mass. 

GOSS, Irving J. 

29 Randall Ave., Somerset, Mass. 

p. 122, 306 

GRANNIS, Frederic W. 

3 5 Woodcrcst Ave., Short Hills, N. J. 
p. 307 

GRIFFIN, John J. 

31 Lincoln St., Winchester, Mass. 

p. 84, 100, 118, 250, 291, 292, 307 

GRIFFIN, Stephen C. 

26 Windom St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 307 

GREENE, Michael T. 

28 Woodchester Dr., Milton, Mass. 

GUNDERSEN, Robert F. 

32 Woodchester Dr., Milton, Mass. 
p. 307 

HAIGHT, Gregory D. 

7615 Lansdale St., District Hts., Md. 

p. 268 

HAJEK, Theodore J. 

135 Terrace View Ave., New York, N. Y. 

p. 307 

HALKOVIC, Stephen A. 

314 Kenvon St., Stratford, Conn. 

p. 307 

HALLISEY, Dennis L. 

1 Edson St., Nashua, N. H. 
p. 307, 330 

HAMBLETON, John W. 

7401 Julian Place, Springfield, Va. 

p. 307 



HAMMILL, Tames F. 

312 Briarcliffe Rd., W. Enslcwood, N. J. 

p. 105, 307 

HANLON, Dennis J. 

23 Hathcrlv Rd., Quincv, Mass. 

p. 3, 289, 307 

HANNOLD, Howard T. 

201 Ellis Rd., Havertown, Pa. 

p. 307 

HANNON, William W. 

43 7 Hopper Ave., Ridge^-^ood, N. J. 
p. 307 

HANRAHAN, John W. 

68 Hope St., Stamford, Conn. 

p. 121, 308 

HARDIMAN, William P. 

605 Lagrange St., W. Roxburv, Mass. 

p. 308 

HARDY, Joseph M. 

W. Brookfield Rd., N. Brookfield, Mass. 

p. 105, 308 

HARRIGAN, Paul M. 

9 Hesston Ter., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 308 ^ 

HARRINGTON, Henry J. 

130 Grove St., W. Roxburv, Mass. 

p. 266, 308 

HARRINGTON, Thomas J. 

165 5 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 271, 308 

HARTNETT, James G. 

57 Lawson Rd., Winchester, Mass. 

p. 124, 286, 302, 308, 328, 362 

HARTZEL, Peter C. 

204 Jefferson St., Dedham, Mass. 
p. 308 

HASSEY, Francis E. 

31 Willoughby St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 308 

HEDSTROM, John G. 

2 Lee St., Tewksbury, Mass. 
p. 295, 308 

HIGGINS, John D. 

83 Standish Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 308 

HOEFLING, Richard K. 

1717 Normon St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 308 

HORTON, Lewis F. 
Main St., Southboro, Mass. 
p. 309 

HOSKER, Rayford P. 

44 Linden Terrace, Lynn, Mass. 
p. 309 



HOUSER, Vincent P. 

East Moutain Rd., Wcstfield, Mass. 

p. 309 

HOUSTON, John R. 

24 MayFair St., Norwood, Mass. 

p. 100, 309 

HOWARD, John C. 

510 Third St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 11, 309 

HOYE, William J. 

529 Orchard St., Rocky Hill, Conn. 

HUBBARD, Francis J. 

161 Senator Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HUNT, Neal E. 

8 Paul Ave., New Hvde Pk., N. Y. 

p. 247, 270, 309 

HURLEY, William J. 

18 George St., Norwood, Mass. 

p. 309 

HUSSON, Christopher J. 

70 Bellevue Dr., Rochester, N. Y. 

p. 309 

lANNACCONE, Fred A. 

237 E 18th St., Paterson, N. J. 
p. 309 

JESSOE, Francis A. 

96 Tvndale St., Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 310 

JONES, Michael E. 

12 Ohio Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 

p. 224, 310 

JOYCE, John J. 

62 Sheldon St., Milton, Mass. 

p. 310 

KANE, Joseph A. 

31 Farragut Rd., Swampscott, Mass. 

p. 326 

KARNS, Alfred B. 

40 Grayson St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 310 

KARR, Stephen H. 

12 Colbourne Crescent, Brookline, Mass. 

p. 310 

KEEFE, William N. 

18 Walter St., RosHndale, Mass. 

p. 310 

KELEHER, George L. 

425 Pleasant St., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 310 

KELLEY, Edward F. 

3 5 Eliot St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 310 

KELLEY, Joseph M. 

12 Witheridge St., Agawam, Mass. 

p. 310 



KELLIHER, Joseph A. 

16 Autumn Circle, Canton, Mass. 

p. 311 

KELLY, Robert J. 

74 Bourne St., Brockton, Mass. 

p. 231, 311 

KELLY, William I. 

3 5 Lindall St., Roshndale, Mass. 

p. 81, 97, 311 

KENNEDY, John J. 

153 Common St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 245, 311 

KEYO, John C. 

84 Theodore Pker. Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 105, 311 

KILEY, Gerard F. 

60 Lake Street, Winchester, Mass. 

KING, James M. 

113 East Cedar Lane, Teaneck, N. J. 

p. 311 

KINNEY, Peter M. 

18 High St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 311 

KOSIOREK, Richard A. 
918 Fulton St., Erie, Pa. 
p. 122, 311 

KOTERBAY, Robert J. 

110 Hale Terr., Bridgeport, Conn. 

p. 310, 311 

KOZLOWSKI, Chester E. 

73 Beach St., New Britain, Conn. 

p. 311 

LABRECQUE, Douglas R. 

132 Columbia Blvd., Waterbury, Conn. 

p. 118, 127, 249, 312, 328, 334 

LEGADEC, Gerald 

Gilmore Rd., Southboro, Mass. 

p. 312 

LAMONTAGNE, William H. 

69 Berlin Street, Dedham, Mass. 
p. 312 

LANDERS, John E. 

26 Lewis Terr., Newton, Mass. 

p. 100, 266, 312 

LANE, Christopher P. 

1117 Baker Street, Peabodv, Mass. 

p. 312 

LARCHEZ, Mark E. 

202 Governors Rd., Ouincy, Mass. 

p. 312 

LAREAU, NORMAN P. 

70 Miles Ave., Fairport, N. Y. 
p. 303, 313, 319 

LARKIN, George F. 

267 East 4th Ave., Roselle, N. J. 

p. 247, 313 



LAROCCA. Robert K. 

29 High St.. Everett, Mass. 

p. 100, 105, 313 

LA ROCHE. Roland A. 

538 Burgess St., Berlin, N. H. 

p. 313 

LAURENO. Laurence M. 

1106 Stilhvater Rd., Stamford, Conn. 

p. 313 

LEBEN, William R. 

361 Faneuil St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 313 

LECLAIR, Thomas E. 

10 Carol Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 

p. 313 

LEEKLEY, lohn R. 

Roast Meat Hill Road, Killingworth, Conn. 

p. 114 

LEGARDE, Charles N. Ill 

73 Arlington Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

LEGGERO. Louis A. 

166 Arlington St., Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 313 

LENTO, Thomas V. 

Countrv Club Circle, N. Scituate, Mass. 

p. 314 

LINNEHAN, David G. 

40 Hazel Avenue, Scituate, Mass. 

p. 314 

LOGAN, Joseph F. 

16 Sheridan Dr., Milton, Mass. 

p. 314 

LOMAC, James J. 

112 Clark St., Portland, Me. 

p. 270, 314 

LONERGAN, Edward J. 

36 Oliver St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 314 

LOPRESTI, John P. 

834 W. Eighth St., Plainfield, N. J. 

p. 314 

LUCEY, Diarmid M. 
Tunnel Rd., Newtown, Conn. 

LUCIE, James J. 

662 Cedar Lane, Teaneck, N. J. 

p. 2, 232, 232A, 233, 314 

LUNDGREN, James T. 

184 River St., N. Weymouth, Mass. 

p. 314 

LYNCH, JoseDh H. 

497 Dwight Rd., Springfield, Mass. 

p. 114, 115, 314 



LYNCH, William J. 

25 Morse St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 314 

LYONS, David J. 

31 Hendry St., Dorchester, Mass. 

LYONS, Richard C. 

28 Woodside Dr., Milton, Mass. 

p. 314 

MACDONALD, Paul E. 
78 Revere St., Milton, Mass. 
p. 314 

MACDOUGALL, Joseph W. 

61 Halliday St., Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 315 

MACKIN, John M. 

128 N. Woodstock Dr., Cherry Hill, N. J. 

p. 317 

MACNEIL, Daniel J. 

292 Main St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 315 

MADDEN, William E. 

346 Common St., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 317 

MADIGAN, John A. 

22 Sunnybank Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 317 

MAGNER, Joseph A. 

100 Montebello Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
p. 317 

MAHLE, David M. 

266 Slocum Wav, Fort Lee, N. J. 

p. 271 

MAHONEY, James J. Jr. 

349 Brookline St., Needham, Mass. 

p. 100, 124, 250, 253, 318 

MAITLAND, Gerald P. 

HE. Crescent Ave., Ramsey, N. J. 

p. 318 

MALKEMUS, Charles M. 

101 South Main St., Uxbridge, Mass. 
p. 318 

MANASSERI, Richard J. 

2402 Olson St., Marlow Hts., Md. 

MANNING, James K. 

5212 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, Md. 

p. 127, 247, 269, 318 

MANNING, Michael J. 

35 Loyed Ave., Brockton, Mass. 

MANSFIELD, Joseph G. 

110 Beacon St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

p. 121, 318 

MANSON, Melvin A. 

95 Pickering St., Danvers, Mass. 



MARIER, Robert L. 

34 Home Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 318 

MARIER, Vincent E. 

34 Home Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 128, 318 

MASON, John L. 

40 Hobart St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 318 

MASTROPOLO, John J. 

6 HoIl>^vood Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. 

p. 318 

MCCARTHY, Edward J. 

5 Marcia Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 315 

MCCARTHY, John J. 

225 Fairmount Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

MCCREARY, Eugene P. 
RR No. 2, Metropolis, 111. 

MCDONALD, John J. 

33 Betts Road, Belmont, Mass. 

p. 315 

MCDONOUGH, Edwin J. 

3 5 Morton Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 103, 248, 249, 313, 316, 334 

MCDONOUGH, Lawrence J. 

417 Geneva Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 316 

MCDONOUGH, Michael G. 
106 Broadway, Woodland, Me. 
p. 316 

MCFARLAND, Edward R. 

36 Oakmere Street, W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 316 

MCGAHAN, Peter M. 

850 East 38th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 316 

MCGOUGH, Philip F. 

8463 Kneeland Ave., Ehnhurst, N. Y. 

p. 316 

MCGOWAN, James E. 

531 Prospect Ave., Oradell, N. J. 

p. 186, 193, 224, 316 

MCGUINESS, John P. 

128 Train St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 316 

MCGUNNIGLE, Michael G. 

62 Hyde Rd., W. Hartford, Conn. 

p. 317 

MCGUIRE, Edward C. 

23 Lawndale St., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 100, 317 



MCINTYRE, Alan F. 

167 Edgewater Dr., Framingham, Mass. 

p. 317 

MCLAUGHLIN, Joseph T. 

246 Washington St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 104, 317 

MCLAUGHLIN, Justin S. 

585 Careswell St., Marshfield, Mass. 
p. 123 

MCLAUGHLIN, Michael J. 

436 Medford Street, Maiden, Mass. 

p. 317 

MCLAUGHLIN, WilHam A. 

76 Gilder Rd., Rfd., Buzzards Bay, Mass. 

MCMULLEN, James 

338 Maine Street, W. Concord, Mass. 

p. 317 

MCNEIL, Hugh W. 

351 Cornell St., Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 317 

MCRAE, Howard F. 

15 Branch St., Mansfield, Mass. 

p. 317 

MELLO, Douglas 

1 147 President Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

p. 84, 253, 271, 291, 292, 318 

MELOCIK, J. Russell 

2706 Glendale Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

p. 318 

MICHELS, Francis J. 

22 Olney Dr., Eggertsville, N. Y. 

p. 318 

MILHOLLAND, Arthur V. 
1923 Barry Road, Baltimore, Md. 

MILKS, William W. 

558 Minard Run, Bradford, Pa. 

p. 319 

MILLER, Gary L. 

1180 Merwins Lane, Westport, Conn. 

p. 319 

MIRANDA, John A. 

42 Cuba St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 319 

MIRARCHI, Francis J. 

593 Country Way, Egypt, Scituate, Mass. 

MISTLER, William A. 

31 Moville St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 319 

MITCHELL, Thomas F. 

71 Tower St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 319 

MONAHAN, Albert C. 

103 Rock Island Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

p. 319 



MORAN, Joseph M. 

172 N. Main St., N. Easton, Mass. 

p. 319 

MORASH, Ronald P. 

2 Becket St., N. Quincy, Mass. 
p. 319 

MORONEY, Paul R. 

10 Webster St., ArHngton, Mass. 
p. 320 

MORRISSEY, Edmond J. 

3150 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

p. 320 

MUDD, Raymond D. 

64 Woburn St., Medford, Mass. 

p. 320 

MULCAHY, James A. 

1.9 Darius Court, S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 320 

MULLARE, Paul A. 

90 Beech St., Braintree, Mass. 

p. 224, 320 

MURPHY, Joseph F. 

137 Krysiak Ave., Fitchburg, Mass. 

p. 320 

MURRAY, Peter H. 

1843 Trough Sprgs Ln., Louisville, Ky. 

p. 320 

MURRAY, Stephen P. 

17 Lincoln St., Milton, Mass. 

p. 320 

MURRAY, Thomas J. 

3 3 Bynner St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
p. 321, 361 

NAGY, Blaise 

Box 61, Acton, Mass. 

p. 321 

NICHOLSON, Francis H. 

209 Governors Ave., Quincy, Mass. 

p. 321 

NICOLAZZO, Antonio M. 
39 Moffat Rd., Waban, Mass. 
p. 321 

NEIF, Ronald P. 

8 Oak St., Westport, Conn. 

p. 3, 80, 80A, 81, 97, 123, 246, 321, 330 

NIOSI, Paul F. 

20 Ocallaghan Way, S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 321 

O'BRIEN, Andrew J. 

179 Cedar St., Braintree, Mass. 

p. 321 

O'BRIEN, Gerald R. 

56 Samson Rd., Medford, Mass. 

p. 322 



O'BRIEN, George J. 

8 Mill Lane, E. Braintree, Mass. 

O'BRIEN, James E. 

66 Paon Blvd., Wakefield, Mass. 

p. 322 

O'BRIEN, John R. 

24 Ken^vood St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 100, 322 

O'BRIEN, Matthew C. 

704 Lowell St., W. Peabodv, Mass. 

p. 231, 322 

O'CONNELL, Daniel J. 

17 Lawley St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 322 

O'CONNELL, Joseph T. 

68 Linwood St., Maiden, Mass. 
p. 322 

O'DAY, John J. 

53 Howard St., Norwood, Mass. 

O'DONNELL, James F. 

5 Larkhill Road, W. Roxbury, Mass. 

O'HARE, Robert J. 

13 Franklin St., Stoughton, Mass. 

p. 125, 322 

O'MALLEY, John R. 

69 Adams St., Norwood, Mass. 

p. 84, 291, 292, 316, 322, 325 

O'MALLEY, William T. 

1047 Walnut St., Newton, Mass. 

O'NEIL, Gerald J. 

100 Fales Avenue, Norwood, Mass. 

p. 322 

O'NEIL, Harold F. Jr. 

37 Franklin St., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 322 

O'TOOLE, John J. 

294 Highland St., Milton, Mass. 

p. 3, 98, 289, 322 

PATTEN, John G. 

Ethan Allen Lane, Stamford, Conn. 

p. 322 

PELLETIER, Alban J. 

10 Carrigg Rd., Squantum, Mass. 

p. 323 

PERROTTI, Robert A. 

27 Litchfield Tnpk., Woodbridge, Conn. 

p. 109, 270, 323 

PERRY, Stephen F. 

267 Centre St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 323 

PEZZOLI, Raymond J. 

52 Elmont Rd., Elmont, N. Y. 

p. 249, 296, 312, 323 



PHILLIPS, Eugene A. 

39 Clinton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 323 

PIANKA, Walter J. Jr. 

26 Orange St., Chelsea, Mass. 

PIOPPI, DENNIS A. 

6 Clvfton St., Plymouth, Mass. 
p. 323 

PIROZZOLI, Charles L. 

80 Lorma Ave., Trumbull, Conn. 

PISANI, Michael J. 

5404 Ridgefield Rd., Bethsda, Md. 

p. 100, 3^23 

PLEINES, William H. 

744 Savin Ave., W. Haven, Conn. 

p. 323 

PLOURDE, Robert F. 

7 Phillips Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 
p. 324 

PREVITE, Frank E. 

178 Mvstic St., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 324 

PURCELL, Edward R. 

42 Ruskin Ct., E. Aurora, N. J. 

p. 324 

OUIGLEY, Garry T. 

20 Oxford Ct., Stamford, Conn. 

p. 102, 324 

QUIGLEY, George E. 

150 Church St., Newton, Mass. 

p. 324 

QUINN, Dennis J. 

17 Marjorie St., PlvTriouth, Mass. 

p. 324 

QUINN, Frank J. 

41 Colgate Rd., Newton, Mass. 

p. 324 

QUINN, James T. 

26 Dover Ter., Westwood, Mass. 
p. 324 

QUINN, John P. 

29 Shamrock St., Worcester, Mass. 

p. 325 

RADOMSKI, Richard S. 

27 Raymond Ter., E. Norwalk, Conn, 
p. 325 

RAFANIELLO, Jerald A. 
55 Steele Rd., Bristol, Conn, 
p. 89, 325 

RAYMOND, Paul A. 

168 Forest St., Fall River, Mass. 

p. 325 

RAYNER, Thomas T. 

128 Westminster Ave., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 325 



REAGAN, William J. 

18 Sumner Rd., Salem, Mass. 

p. 325 

REARDON, Leo B. 

595 Beech St., Roslindale, Mass. 

REDFERN, John R. 

95 Erie Avenue, Newton, Mass. 

p. 324, 325 

REILLY, William A. Jr. 

3 Allen Circle, Milton, Mass. 

p. 325 

RENNIE, George F. 

3 54 Pelham St., Methuen, Mass. 

p. 326 

RENZI, Paul R. 

23 Irving St., Revere, Mass. 

p. 326 

RIBEIRO, John Jr. 

261 Havre St., E. Boston, Mass. 

p. 326 

RILEY, Thomas J. 

446 Main St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 326 

RITCHIE, Kenneth C. 

31 Herrick St., Beverly, Mass. 

ROBERTS, John A. 

21 Mt. Washington St., Lowell, Mass. 
p. 326 

RODRIGUES, William P. 

144 School St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 326 

ROGAN, Joseph P. 

123 Rice Road, Quincy, Mass. 

p. 326 

ROSIER, Ronald C. 

1373 Pentwood Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

p. 327 

RUDMAN, Lester C. 

25 Westchester Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 327 

RYAN, Thomas A. 

18 Telegraph St., S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 120, 121, 327 

RYAN, Thomas F. 

451 Washington Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 327 

RYAN, William A. 

88 Gary Ave., Milton, Mass. 

p. 327 

RYNNE, Edward M. 

300 Eliot St., Milton, Mass. 

SANTA BARBARA, John F. 

30 Blueberry Hill, Waterbury, Conn. 



SCALLY, Gerald F. 

425 W. Roxbury Pkwy., W. Rox., Mass. 

p. 327 

SCANGA, Francis N. 

31 Upcrest Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

SCARFO, William J. 

58 Betts Road, Belmont, Mass. 

SCHARAFFA, Frank J. 

882 Winthrop Ave., Revere, Mass. 

p. 327 

SCHNEIDER, Jon D. 

81 Williams St., Bradford, Pa. 
p. 327 

SCHULE, John J. Ill 

7406 Glendora Dr., District Hts., Md. 

p. 327 

SEABROOK, David G. 

3 Newton Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 327 

SENCIO, Gary J. 

67 Maplehurst Ave., New Britain, Conn. 

p. 248, 249, 327 

SEVIGNEY, Leonard A. 
Bellevue House, Wells Beach, Me. 
p. 231, 328 

SGARZI, Richard H. 

120 Main St., Kingston, Mass. 

p. 269, 326, 328 

SHANN, Robert A. 

73 Chandler Road, Andover, Mass. 

p. 193, 328 

SHERIDAN, Philip H. 

117 Child St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

p. 99, 328 

SHIELDS, John F. 

907 Main St., Maiden, Mass. 

p. 11, 306, 328 

SILVER, William S. 

102 Forest St., N. Dighton, Mass. 

p. 328 

SKEHAN, David G. 

51 Presentation Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 329 

SMITH, Edwin D. 

7216 113th St., Forest Hills, N. Y. 

p. 329 

SOLDANO, Matthew M. 

1934 U Place, S.E., Washington, D.C. 

p. Ill, 329 

SOMERS, Jeffery P. 

59 Park Avenue, Verona, N. J. 

p. 249, 268, 329 

SOUTHWICK, Charles J. 

859 Wallace Ave., Baldwin, L. I., N. Y. 

p. 126, 249, 329 



STENSON, James B. 

58 Horan Way, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

STEPHENSON, Edward R. 

361 Dedham Ave., Needham, Mass. 

p. 329 

STERLING, William A. 

624 Mayuood Dr., San Bernadino, Cal. 

p. 108,' 120, 329 

STEVENS, Thomas C. 

184 White St., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 329 

ST. PIERRE, John Raoul 

32 Woodland Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

SAUREZ, Alfredo A. 

2501 A Center St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 114, 329 

SUGRUE, Edward C. 

11 Brownell St., New Haven, Conn. 

p. 329 

SULLIVAN, Richard J. 

69 Glendale St., Dorchester, Mass. 

SWECH, Robert A. 

790 White Birch Rd., Westwood P O, N. J 

p. 249, 312, 329 

SWIET, Robert V. 

801 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

p. 330 

THORNTON, Martin T. 

88 Dudley St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 330 

THORNTON, Peter J. 

4624 243rd St., Douglaston, N. Y. 

TOMPSON, Allen E. 

1 Riverview St., Taunton, Mass. 

p. 330 

TOOMEY, Daniel F. 

3 5 Roseland St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 330 

TRAVERS, John C. 

42 Patten St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 330 

TREDEAU, Robert P. 

41 North Bow St., Milford, Mass. 

p. 330 

TREVISANI, Thomas M. 

23 Harding Avenue, Everett, Mass. 

p. 331 

TRYBULSKI, Walter J. 

14 Carlton Ave., Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

p. 331 

TYSON, George J. 

237 Winthrop St., Taunton, Mass. 

p. 331 



VARY, James P. 

2296 So. Belvair Blvd., Univ. Hts., Ohio 

p. 114, 331 

VENA, Joseph A. 

5 Duncan Ct., Jersey City, N. J. 

p. 271, 332 

VERNON, John E. 

I George St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 332 

VUJS, Gary R. 

14 Hawley St., Newington, Conn. 

p. 332 

WALSH, Robert E. 

405 North Ave., Weston, Mass. 

WARING, Paul C. 

137 Robbins Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 332 

WASSMANDORF, Mark J. 
60 Pawling Ave., Troy, N. Y. 
p. 332 

WATSON, William J. 

37 Bright Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 332 

WELBURN, Alfred T. 

1 Primuse Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

p. 333 

WEST, George J. 

202 Alabama Ave., Providence, R. I. 

WHITE, Holman T. 

52 Glennon Ave., Dalton, Mass. 

p. 333 

WHITE, Robert P. 

10 Plvmouth St., New Hyde Pk., L. I., N. "5 

p. 333 

WIESMAN, Hugh A. 

465 Crescent Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

p. 100, 334 

WILLIAMS, Dennis P. 

22 Sherwood Ave., Webster, N. Y. 

p. 125, 334 

WINO, Vincent G. 

152 Dellwood Road, Bronxville, N. Y. 

p. 334 

WOODS, James F. 

30 St. Marks Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 334 

YAUCKOES, John F. 

56 Evergreen St., Bedford, Mass. 

p. 193 

ZOLLER, David F. 

22 Marion Rd., Marblehead, Mass. 

p. 334 

ZOLLER, Eugene D. 

22 Marion Rd., Marblehead, Mass. 



EVENING COLLEGE 



BADDERS, Philip L. 

235 Lake Shore Drive, Cochituate, Mass. 

p. 337 

BERGERON, Joanne H. 

45 Winter Street, Nahant, Mass. 

p. 337 

BERRINI, Fulvio L. 

45 Trafford Street, Quincv, Mass. 

p. 337 

BRADLEY, John T. 

1457 Center Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 337 

COLLINS, Donald P. 

3 1 Newport Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 337 

CONLEY, Elizabeth A. 

210 Derby Street, West Newton, Mass. 

p. 337 

CONNOR, Roger L. 

79 Edwin Street, North Randolph, Mass. 
p. 337 

CORKERY, Dennis F. 

80 Clarkwood Street, Mattapan, Mass. 
p. 335, 336, 337 

CROWLEY, Edmund G. 

10 Clematis Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
p. 337 

FLANAGAN, John P. 

55 Teel Street, Arhngton, Mass. 

p. 337 

FLANSBURG, Joyce S. 

183 Arlington Street, Framingham, Mass. 

p. 337 

GORRIE, Edward J. Jr. 

1 1 Longwood Avenue, Beverly, Mass. 
p. 338 

HANRAHAN, Mary E. 

245 Kelton Street, Brighton, Mass. 

p. 338 

HASENFUS, David P. 

1 5 Kirk Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 338 

HAYES, William J. 

12 Hinckley Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
p. 338 

KELLY, Claudia 

1949 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 338 



KELLY, Francis J. 

4 Cotton Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 338 

KELLY, Grace P. 

1949 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 338 

KELLY, William M. 

34 School Street, Newton, Mass. 

p. 335, 336, 338 

LECLAIR, Sandra L. 

3 74 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

p. 338 

LYNCH, John J. 

96 Bellevue Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 338 

MCLEAN, Barbara J. 

36 Edson St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 339 

MARTIN, Gerald C. 

10 Hatch Street, South Boston, Mass. 

p. 339 

ONDZES, James J. 

571 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 339 

O'NEILL, Therese K. 

25 Bettinson Avenue, Everett, Mass. 

p. 339 

O'ROURKE, Donald M. 

158 Brown Avenue, RosHndale, Mass. 

p. 339 

PLANTE, Suzanne M. 

93 Mount Vernon Street, Boston, Mass. 

p. 339 

PLONOWSKI, Mary P. 

145 Haverhill Street, Andover, Mass. 

p. 340 

SABA, Raymond A. 

96 Magoun Avenue, Medford, Mass. 

p. 340 

SEVIGNY, Thomas E. 

44 Wcstland Street, Brockton, Mass. 

p. 340 

SWEENEY, ?>Liry E. 

10 Charles E. Ryan Road, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 335, 336, 340 

TAYLOR, Helen C. 

2032 Dorchester Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 340 

VOUTSELAS, Eleanore C. 

39 Pincrest Road, Holliston, Mass. 

p. 340 

ZANOTTI, Paul M. 

1857 Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton 

p. 340 



COLLEGE OF 

BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 



ALBERTI, Joseph F. 

8 A Brook St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 343 

ALLEN, William V. 

309 Newport Ave., WoUaston, Mass. 

p. 343 

AMBROSE, James F. 

15 Cornell St., Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 343 

ANGINO, Francis C. 

47 Sheldon Rd., Newton Ctr., Mass. 

p. 343 

ARMENIO, Salvatore D. 

20004 36th Ave., Bayside, N. Y. 

p. 193, 343 

BAILEY, Gary R. 

40 Kelton Avenue, Schenectady, N. Y. 

BALDWIN, George A. 

69 Buckman Dr., Lexington, Mass. 

p. 343 

BALLERENE, Louis T. 

59 Walden St., Newton, Mass. 

p. 343 

BARANOSKY, Joseph A. 

170 Central Ave., Needham Hts., Mass. 

p. 343 

BARRY, Edward G. 

1219 Washington St., S. Braintree, Mass. 

p. 343 

BARRY, Hugh J. 

4 Hill Street, Millinocket, Me. 

p. 119, 343, 345 

BATTOS, John J. 

3 5 Tcmpleton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 343 

BAUER, Paul D. 

33 5 Woodcrest Blvd., Kenmore, N. Y. 
p. 343 

BEADER, Stephen M. 

630 Beach St., Revere, Mass. 

p. 344 

BECKER, Frederick J. 

85 Harvard St., Dedham, Mass. 

BELFORD, Paul A. 

6 Grace Court, Bay Shore, N. Y. 

p. 11, 248, 249, 313, 344, 414 

BERRY, Robert H. 

91 Milton St., Arhngton, Mass. 

p. 344 



BERTOLAMI, Peter J. 

132 Wildwood Ave., Arlington, Mass. 
p. 344 

BEVIVINO, Joseph C. 

15 Dutton Ave., Bristol, Conn. 

p. 344 

BISHOP, Gene J. 

205 Manor Hill Rd., Stratford, Conn. 

p. 344 

BLANCO, Marcellino E. 
54 J J Esteves, Arecibo, P. R. 
p. 344 

BLEILER, Charles T. 

40 Ramshead Road, Medford, Mass. 

BLONGASTAINER, Augustin 

3 Mount Ida Ter., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 100, 344 

BLOWERS, Carl H. 

383 East Franklin St., Horseheads, N. Y. 

BOKOSKE, Charles K. 

3 Rockland Street, Natick, Mass. 

BOLAND, Robert F. 

342 Summer St., Framingham, Mass. 

p. 345 

BONO, Austen J. 

81 Brook Street, Wollaston, Mass. 

p. 345 

BRADY, Daniel J. 

140 Grant Ave., Medford, Mass. 
p. 345 

BREED, Joseph M. 

6 Cenacle Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 345 

BROGAN, James J. 

66 Bromfield Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 345 

BRUNELLI, John F. 

71 Brook Street, Franklin, Mass. 

p. 345 

BRYSON, Neil F. 

440 Roosevelt Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

p. 345 

BURKE, Thomas F. 

140 Spring St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 345 

BURKE, William F. 

163 King St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 346 

BURNS, Kevin J. 

16 Christine Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 346 

BUTLER, Edward P. 

45 Perry Ave., Brockton, Mass. 

p. 193, 247, 346 



BUTLER, L. Peter 

3S Willard St., Hamden, Conn. 

p. .^46 

CALLAHAN, John J. 

6 Samosct St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 346 

CALLAHAN, John i\L Jr. 

1168 Morton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 346 

CANNINGTON, James A. 
50 Walnut St., Reading, Mass. 
p. 347 

CAPPUCCL John R. 

71 Sammet St., Everett, Mass. 

CAPUANO, John O. 

129 Bucknam St., Everett, Mass. 

p. 347 

CARLONI, Thomas E. 
38 Hall PI., Quincy, Mass. 
p. 347 

CARMODY, Joseph P. 

6 Narragansett St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 347 

CARROLL, John J. 

Mass. Hospital School, Canton, Mass. 

p. 347 

CARROLL, Joseph P. 

93 Undine Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 

p. 347 

CARROLL, Robert W. 

9 Johnson Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 347 

CARROLL, Wallace E. 

900 North Waukcgan Rd., Lake Forest, 111. 

p. 347 

CARVELLL Albert B. 

19 Reedsdale Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 347 

CASEY, Daniel S. 

252 Appleton St., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 347 

CASEY, Donald P. 

54 Cutter Hill Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 347 

CEGLIA, Gerald C. 

1 2 Curtis Street, Somerville, Mass. 

CERCONE, Louis E. 

228 South St., Bristol, Conn. 

p. 109, 347 

CHADWICK, Lester W. 

54 Commercial St., Marblehead, Mass. 
p. 348 

CHIARIELLO, Leonard A. 

324 Vermont St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 348 



CHISHOLM, Paul 

52 Cotting Street, Medford, Mass. 
p. 231 

CHISHOLM, Thomas B. 

6 Grasshopper Lane, N. Scituate, Mass. 
p. 348 

CLARK, Thomas J. 

60 Weston Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. 

p. 348 

CLAYMAN, Burton H. 

27 Mora St., Dorchester, Mass. 
p. 348 

COLLERAN, Paul F. 

201 Stratford St., W. Roxburv, Mass. 

p. 348 

COLLINS, Edward J. 

104 Washington St., Hvde Park, Mass. 

p. 245, 253, 348 

COLLINS, Philip J. 

4 Upland Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 348 

CONGILIANDO, Ernest J 
42 Butler St., Revere, Mass. 
p. 348 

CONNOLLY, John J. 
233 L St., S. Boston, Mass. 
p. 348 

CONNOLLY, Robert F. 

7 Sedgewick Park, Woburn, Mass. 
p. 348 

CONNOR, Michael F. 

28 Phaneuf St., Middleton, Mass. 
p. 232, 348 

CONNOR, William C. 

Birch Lane, W. Scituate, Mass. 

p. 349 

COOKE, Peter J. 

14 Moore Street, N. Quincv, Mass. 

p. 349 

COPPOLA, John A. 

9 Calvin Rd., Bostona Plain, Mass. 

p. 349 

COTE, Thomas J. 

607 Spuhler Place, Uniondale, N. Y. 

p. 126, 349 

COTTER, John E. 

710 Webster St., Needham, Mass. 

p. 349 

COUGHLIN, Francis G. 

3 Wilmington Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 349 

COYLE, David 

1 1 Liberty Street, Beverly, Mass. 

COYLE, Ravmond A. 

17 Richfield Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 349 



CRANE, Thomas P. 

6 Brentwood Street, Foxboro, Mass. 

CREHAN, Lawrence J. 

93 Playstead Rd., W. Medford, Mass. 

p. 349 

CROKER, Henry H. 

95 Mann Hill Rd., N. Scituate, Mass. 

p. 350 

CRONIN, David M. 

67 Hill St., Auburn, Mass. 

p. 350 

CRONIN, William F. 

75 Mill St., Reading, Mass. 

p. 3, 176, 176A, 177, 182, 193, 350 

CRYAN, Peter J. 

7 Bachelder St., Lowell, Mass. 
p. 350 

CULLEN, James F. 

63 Concord Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 350 

CUNNIFF, Joseph R. 

145 Middlesex Ave., Medford, Mass. 

p. 350 

DALY, John F. 

33 Woodleigh Road, Watertown, Mass. 

p. 190, 193, 350 

DAUSCH, Stephen G. 

3093 Culver Rd., Rochester, N. Y. 

p. 350 

DECARO, Fred A. 

Sweet Briar Lane, Cos Cob, Conn. 

p. 351 

DEFELICE, Francis A. 

85 Sargent St., Winthrop, Mass. 
p. 7, 193, 224, 351 

DEMIANCZYK, Stephen C. 

RD 2, Castleton on Hudson, N. Y. 

p. 351 

DE PIETRO, Joseph F. 

158 O Street, S. Boston, Mass. 

DEROSIER, J. David 

3 Tallwood Dr., W. Barrington, R. I. 

p. 351 

DEVER, Joseph B. 

288 Vermont St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

DEVINE, James J. 

1 Range Road, Dorchester, Mass. 
p. 351 

DEVLIN, William P. 

2 Grotto Glen Road, Jamaica PL, Mass. 
p. 351 

DICKSON, John H. 

23 Jackson Ter., Newton, Mass. 

p. 100 ,351 

DOBBIN, Louis D. 

86 Hobart Street, Brighton, Mass. 



DOBBYN, Richard J. 

40 Aaron Street, Bristol, R. I. 

DOHERTY, David J. 

135 Beaconsfield Rd., Brookline, Mass. 

p. 351 

DOHERTY, Tames N. 

12 Pennsylvania Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 351 

DOLAN, Kenneth F. 

5 Range Road, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 351 

DONAHUE, Eugene J. 

21 Woodward Ave.. Roxburv, Mass. 

p. 124, 286, 352, 362 

DONNELLAN, Brian J. 

73 Marion St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 352 

DORA, Michael A. 

1878 State St., Hamden, Conn. 

p. 108, 352 

DOWNES, Edward J. 

9 Alden Rd., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 194, 201, 207, 241, 352, 369 

DOYLE, William T. 

50 St. Theresa Ave., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 271, 352 

DRUMMEY, William V. 

4891 Washington St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 85, 289, 341, 342, 352 

DUANE, John F. 

110 Evans Street, N. Quincy, Mass. 

DUFFY, Brian P. 

83 Colonial Ave., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 353 

DUFFY, James F. 

14 Woodbole Ave., Mattapan, Mass. 

p. 353 

DUGGAN, Edward D. 

78 Newton St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 93, 353 

DURSIN, Robert M. 

Farm Dr., Cumberland, R. I. 

p. 353 

ENGLISH, Bruce M. 

226 Westminster Ave., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 353 

ERIKSEN Robert J. 

5 3 Bay State Ave., Somer\ille, Mass. 

EZELL, John F. 

308 Osborne Rd., Loudonville, N. Y. 

p. 208, 211, 213, 214, 218, 220 

FALWELL, David G. 

14 Park Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 108, 349, 353 



FARREN, John B. 

125 Brattle St., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 353 

FAY, Thomas J. Ill 

7 Main Drive, Wenham, Mass. 

p. 353 

FEENEY, Charles F. 

57 Belrose Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

p. 353 

FISH, John H. Jr. 

127 Wcthcrsfield St., Rowlev, Mass. 

p. 353 

FITZGERALD, William H. 

47 Juliette St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 353 

FITZGERALD, William P. 

422 Ashmont Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

FITZGIBBONS, George J. 

9 Maguire Court, Newtonville, Mass. 

FLAHERTY, Paul R. 

24 Clinton St., Everett, Mass. 

p. 353 

FLAHERTY, Thomas V. 

93 Belmont Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

FLATLEY, Kevin M. 

52 Kendall St., Brookline, Mass. 

p. 354 

FLYNN, Walter A. 

91 Loftus Circle, Bridgeport, Conn. 

p. 354 

FOISY, Bernard A. 

85 Fairmount St., Marlboro, Mass. 

p. 354 

FOLEY, Paul J. 

1241 North Main St., Randolph, Mass. 

p. 354 

FORTIN, Richard E. 

164 Oakland Ave., Manchester, N. H. 

p. 354 

FRECHETTE, John D. 

71 Virginia Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 109, 183, 186, 193, 253, 354 

FRISOLI, Leonard M. 

291 School St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 85, 341, 342, 354 

FRYDRYCH, Paul M. 

7 Masconomet Rd., Ipswich, Mass. 
p. 354 

FUCILE, Robert T. 

39 Homestead Ave, Weymouth, Mass. 

p. 354 

GAETA, Edwin L. 

506 Bennington St., E. Boston, Mass. 



GALLO, Paul G. 

10 St. Paul's PL, Garden City, N. Y. 

p. 3 54 

GAMEL, Russel J. 

410 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 354 

GERETY, William J. 

62 Arlington St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

p. 354 

GHILANI, Frank A. 

15 Bethanv Rd., Framingham, Mass. 

p. 355 

GIORDANO, Michael F. 
Elizabeth St., Branford, Conn, 
p. 355 

GIUFFRE, William J. 

292 Summit Avenue, Brighton, Mass. 

p. 355 

GLEASON, John F. 

2683 Old Town Rd., Bridgeport, Conn. 

p. 355 

GLOVER, David R. 

41 Hickorv Dr., Maplewood, N. J. 

p. 232, 355 

GORMAN, Michael J. 

131 SafFord St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

p. 355 

GOSSELIN, Jean P. 

395 Farmington Ave., Bristol, Conn. 

p. 3, 109, 115, 288, 288A, 289, 355, 367 

GOUBEAUD, Charles H. 

34-15 84th St., Jackson Hts., N. Y. 

p. 355 

GRIFFIN, Donald J. 

3 5 Old Morton St., Mattapan, Mass. 

p. 356 

GRISWOLD, Steven G. 

8802 Chardel Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

p. 356 

GROVER, Barry 

107 Wcstbourne Ter., Brookline, Mass. 

p. 356 

GRYWALSKI, Frank T. 

200 Brookside Dr., Fairfield, Conn. 

p. 193, 356 

GUTHRIE, John F. 

340 Cross St., Belmont, Mass. 

p. 356 

HALEY, Dennis J. 

18 Wales Ave., Randolph, Mass. 

p. 356 

HANDWERK, John E. 

28 Packard Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 356 



HANLEY, Jeffrey T. 

465 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, R. I. 

HANSCOM, George P. 

6 Grew Hill Road, Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 356 

HARDY, William J. 

18 Colgate Rd., Needham, Mass. 

p. 357 

HARKINS, Edward J. 

32 Rowe Ave., Lynbrook, N. Y. 

p. 357 

HARTE, Cornelius J. 

29 Simpson Avenue, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 100, 101, 357 

HAYWARD, William G. 

69 Gerald Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 109, 357 

HEASLIP, Paul M. 

40 Edward Ave., Lvnnfield, Mass. 

p. 357 

HENRY, Charles M. 

4 Roslvn Road, Trenton, N. J. 

HOGAN, Edward Joseph 

106 W. Chestnut St., Brockton, Mass. 

HOLLAND, George V. 

49 South Main St., Milford, Mass. 

p. 3 57 

HOLLAND, Lawrence W. 

I Pemberton Ter., Cambridge, Mass. 
p. 357 

HORAN, John C. 

133 Perdue Street, Manchester, N. H. 

p. 357 

HOWARD, David R. 

I I Barstow Street, Maiden, Mass. 
p. 358 

HUMANN, George W. 
34 Metropolitan Oval, New York, N. Y. 
p. 208, 209, 211, 218, 219, 220, 
358, 371 

HURSTAK, Robert J. 

5 Garden Rd., Concord, Mass. 
p. 358 

HUTCHISON, Robert B. 

24 Spaulding St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 358 

JOYCE, Michael P. 

15 N. Munroe Ter., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 358 

JUTRAS, Phillip F. 

324 East High St., Manchester, N. H. 

KANE, Paul J. 

211 W. Ninth St., S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 358 



KEARNS, Francis X. 

159 Highland Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 224, 358 

KEEFE, Timothy F. 

19 Lantern Lane, Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 3 59 

KELLEHER, Joseph J. 

67 Willis St., New Bedford, Mass. 

p. 359 

KELLIHER, Colin E. 

1 1 Plumer St., Everett, Mass. 

p. 359 

KELLY, Charles T. 

114 Fletcher St., Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 359 

KELLY, Eugene T. 

84 Sartell Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 359 

KELLY, John D. 

88 Alban St., Dorchester, Mass. 
p. 359 

KELLY, Richard G. 

15 Grandview Ave., Barre, Vt. 

p. 359 

KENNY, Andrew R. 

5333 42nd St., Washington, D.C. 

p. 193 

KENNY, Thomas C. 

240 Mystic Valley Pk., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 359 

KEYES, Douglas R. 

853 East St., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 360 

KILDERRY, John F. 

18 John St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 360 

KILGALLEN, Francis J. 

1233 Washington St., S. Braintree, Mass. 

p. 360 

KILPATRICK, Richard J. 

6 Livingstone Road, Bloomfield, Conn. 

KILROY, John F. 

89 Stearns Street, Brookline, Mass. 
p. 360 

KING, Thomas C. 

11 Brackenburv St., Maiden, Mass. 

p. 360 

KLEINER, Emil J. Jr. 

Box 36, A3, Main St., Assonet, Mass. 

p. 193 

KOEHLER, Edward V. 

87 Ravenhurst Ave., Staten Island, N. Y. 

KOERBER, Karl T. Jr. 

39 Carle Road, Wollaston, Mass. 

p. 360 



KOUGHAN, Francis M. 

31 Chisholm Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

KOWALSZYK, Thomas J. 

58 Chapman Pkwy., Hamburg, N. Y. 

p. 360 

KRAIEWSKI, Matthew B. 
South Street, Norwell, Mass. 

LACKS, Stanley B. 

90 Webb Street, Weymouth, Mass. 

p. 360 

LADD, Nathaniel F. 

28 Lincoln Street, Belmont, Mass. 

p. 360 

LAMBERT, Laurent P. 

222 Main St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 360 

LANDERS, A. Cole 

173 College Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 360 

LAURANO, Michael A. Ill 

719 Bennington St., E. Boston, Mass. 

p. 360 

LAWLESS, John J. 

7 Champney St., Brighton, Mass. 

LEONARD, John S. 

326 Dorchester St., S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 361 

LEWIS, Gregory F. 

16 Lvall Street, W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 361 

LICHTENSTEIN, Stephen D. 

15 Hackensack Ct., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
p. 361 

LOCKE, Robert A. 

16 Partridge St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 
p. 361 

LOVETT, Richard P. 

1 Asheville Rd., Hvde Park, Mass. 

p. 361 

LOVETT, Wilham R. 

1 Asheville Rd., Hvde Park, Mass. 

p. 361 

LUCEY, Gerald F. 

43 White St., Winchester, Mass. 
p. 361 

LYNCH, Edward B. 

222 Pleasant St., Newton Ctr., Mass. 

p. 361 

LYNCH, Mark S. 

149 Central Ave., Medford, Mass. 

LYNCH, Peter S. 

44 Salisbury Rd., Newton, Mass. 
p. 231, 362 



MACCINI, Louis J. 

1 Yerxa Rd., Cambridge, Mass. 

MACDONALD, Frederick A. 

15 Bavberry Road, N. Scituate, Mass. 

p. 362 

MACGILLIVRAY, William 

34 Folsom St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 362 

MAHAN, Thomas E. 

38 Areola St., Lexington, Mass. 

p. 247, 363 

AL/^HER, John P. 

40 Tacoma St., Boston, Mass. 
p. 363 

MAHON, John F. Jr. 

401 Hoghes Street, Bellmore, N. Y. 

p. 108, 364 

MAHONEY, Francis A. 

92 Pleasant^'iew Ave., Longmeadow, Mass. 

p. 364 

MALMO, James G. 

490 Blauvelt Rd., Blauvelt, N. Y. 

p. 109, 364 

MALONEY, John F. 

41 Lee St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

MANCINL Paul R. 

740 Highland Ave., Maiden, Mass. 

p. 108' 

MARTELL, Ronald N. 

110 Murdock Street, Brighton, Mass. 

p. 364 

^TASTERSON, Edward H. 

234 Clark Avenue, Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 364 

MAURER, David H. 

78 Fitchburg St., Watertown, Mass. 
p. 364 

MCCABE, John P. 

Lloyd La., Lloyd Neck, Huntington, N. Y. 

p. 362 

MCCARTHY, Eugene E. 

3 5 Tonavvanda St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 362 

MCCARTNEY, John J. 

662 Atlantic Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 

p. 362 

MCFARLAND. Francis J. 

135 Theodore Pker. Rd., W. Rox., Mass. 

p. 363 

MCGILLICUDDY, John K. 

70 Fairview Street, Ishngton, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCGOVERN, Edward M. 

260 Bedford St., Lexington, Mass. 

p. 363, 367 



MCLAUGHLIN, Hugh J. 

1 Kimball Road, Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCLAUGHLIN, Philin M. 

503 7 Washington St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCNAMARA, Paul J. 

54 Countrv Club Rd., Melrose, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCNEIL. Harold C. 

98 Montebello Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCNEIL, Lawrence C. 

30 Rustlewood Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCSWEENEY, Robert G. 

117 Pearson Rd., W. Somerville, Mass. 

p. 363 

MCTIGUE, Thomas C. 

24 S. Munroe Ter., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 363 

MICALE, Vincent J. 

72 Orient Ave., Melrose, Mass. 

p. 364 

MIRABELLO, Frank 

332 Broadway, Everett, Mass. 

MITCHELL, Robert B. 

181 East St., E. Walpole, Mass. 

p. 364 

MITCHELL, Thomas A. 

24 CHfF Street, Quincy, Mass. 

p. 364 

MOLLICONE, Joseph 

9 Hollvwood Rd., Providence, R. I. 

p. 109, 364 

MONTMINY, Edward J. 

29 Waldo St., New Bedford, Mass. 

p. 364 

MONTMINY, Richard D. 

2 Beverly Rd., ArHngton, Mass. 

p. 364 

MORAN, Donald F. 
184 Lewis St., Bridgeport, Conn, 
p. 7, 183, 186, 187, 188, 193,286, 
346, 365 

MORELLO, Arthur R. 

72 Elliott Rd., Trumbull, Conn. 

p. 108, 365 

MORIARTY, Albert F. 

19 Flagg St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 365 

MOULTON, Vincent A. 

36 S. Main St., Randolph, Mass. 

p. 365 



MULCAHY, Richard M. 
79 Pond St., Cohasset, Mass. 
p. 271, 366 

MULCAHY, WilHam J. 

76 Landseer St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 224, 366 

MULDOON, James E. 
Turnpike, Rowley, Mass. 
p. 366 

MULLALEY, George T. 

187 Milton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 366 

MULLEN, John F. 

1 1 James Way, Scituate, Mass. 

p. 366 

MURPHY, Frank W. Jr. 

165 Montgomery PI., Paterson, N. J. 

p. 366 

MURPHY, James G. 

30A Mann Street, Hingham, Mass. 

p. 366 

MURPHY, Robert J. 

54 Kenwood St., Portland, Me. 

p. 224, 366 

MURPHY, William J. 

8 Cottonwood Lane, Westbury, N. Y. 

p. 193, 247, 366 

MUSE, Ravmond L. 

16 Grant Rd., Salem, Mass. 

p. 366 

MUSKA, Thomas A. 

P. O. Box 254, Broad Brook, Conn. 

p. 366 

NEALON, Robert T. 

65 Havden Rowe, Hopkinton, Mass. 

p. 366 

NEARY, Peter A. 

102 Mt. Vernon St., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 367 

NELSON, James E. 

131 John Corcoran Pk., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 212, 214, 219, 220, 255, 367 

NELSON, Norman F. 

4 Loring Rd., Lexington, Mass. 

p. 367 

NIRO, Donate F. 

95 High Street, Milford, Mass. 

p. 367 

NOTTAGE, Edward G. 

13 Sparrow Dr., Livingston, N. J. 

p. 367 

O'BRIEN, Robert M. 

151 H. Street, S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 367 



O'CONNELL, Joseph P. 

103 Wren St., W. Roxburv, Mass. 

p. 367 

O'CONNOR, Edward J. 

Mary Ave., Lake Katrine, N. Y. 

p. 108, 253, 367 

ODONNELL, John E. 

516 Western Ave., Augusta, Me. 

p. 368 

OLIVIERI, Charles P. 

44 Spring St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 5, 368 

O'NEILL, John M. 

96 Rogers Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 368 

O'REILLY, John S. 

397 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 

O'TOOLE, William P. 

35 Academy Rd., Leominster, Mass. 

p. 220, 368 

PAINE, WiOiam S. 

78 Bond Street, Norwood, Mass. 

p. 125, 365, 368 

PARK, Robert J. 

10 Woodlawn Ave., Needham, Mass. 

p. 368 

PELLINI, Paul A. 

237 Whitford Ave., Providence, R. I. 

PERGOLA, Carl V. 

173 Charles St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 368 

PESCATORE, Paul E. 

31 A Trull St., Somerville, Mass. 
p. 85, 341, 342, 368 

PETIT, Robert M. 

133 Bedford St., New Bedford, Mass. 

p. 368 

PHELPS, John F. 

56 Bramble Lane, Riverside, Conn. 

p. 368 

PIEMONTE, Richard M. 

25 Sticknev Rd., Medford, Mass. 

p. 100, 368 

PIONTEK, Raymond F. 

35 Maltby Place, New Haven, Conn. 

p. 368 

PIRONE, John P. 

49 Sandrick Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

POOR, James N. 

181 High St., N. Andover, Mass. 

p. 369 

POYANT, Marcel R. 
Box K, Hvannis, Mass. 
p. 369 



PRIANTE, William A. 

138 Allcrton Rd., Newton Hinds., Mass. 

p. 369 

PYBURN, John N. 

187 Lowell St., Peabodv, Mass. 

p. 369 

PYNE, Ed^vard W. 

24 Hood Rd., N. Scituatc, Mass. 

p. 369 

OUIGLEY, William D. 

24 5 Spcen St., Natick, Mass. 
p. 369 

RAEDEL, John R. 

280 Collins Ave., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

p. 104, 115, 119, 369 

RAFTERY, Brian J. 

2318 Mass. A\cnue, Lexington, Mass. 
p. 369 

REGAN, John T. 

202 Powder House Blvd., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 370 

RIDGE, Coleman 

3 3 Wildwood Avenue, Newtonville, Mass. 

RILEY, Jcffrev E. 

267 Aquidneck St., New Bedford, Mass. 

p. 370 

RILEY, Paul L. 

40 Taylor St., Quincy, Mass. 

p. 85, 111, 266, 341, 342, 370, 371 

RITUCCI, Domenic P. 

52 Kenelworth Ave., Brockton, Mass. 

p. 370 

RODDY, Michael P. 

3115 Avenue M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 370 

ROSS, Paul A. 

213 Derby Street, W. Newton, Mass. 

p. 370 

ROTONDO, John V. 

3 5 Richardson St., Woburn, Mass. 

p. 224, 370 

RUBERTO, Anthony J. 

85 Spadina Pkwy., Pittsfield, Mass. 

p. 370 

RUMLEY, Robert P. 

23 Englehutt Rd., Medford, Mass. 

p. 3 70 

RYAN, Bruce J. 

10 Anawan Ter., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 370 

RYAN, Richard P. 

34 Sixth Street, Providence, R. I. 

p. 370 

RYAN, Robert E. 

18 Telegraph St., S. Boston, Mass. 



SAVAGE, Richard R. 

19 Rhodes Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

p. 370 

SCACCIA, Angelo M. 

59 Readville St., Readville, Mass. 

SCHILPP, David W. 

324 Trcmont St., Newton, Mass. 

p. 109, 207, 253, 371 

SCHOECK, William E. 

5 3 Griffith Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. 

p. 193, 371 

SELLERS, William L. 

64 Chetwvnd Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 371 

SEMENSI, John J. 

64 North St., Randolph, Mass. 

p. 371 

SEVIGNY, John F. 

182 Manthorne Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 372 

SHEEHAN, David M. 

289 Maple St., New Bedford, Mass. 

p. 83, 109, 372 

SHEEHAN, John F. 

19 Dakota Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 3 72 

SHERLOCK, Robert L. 
150 Taft St., Revere, Mass. 
p. 372 

SHERMAN, Vernon F. 

66 Warren St., Medford, Mass. 

p. 372 

SHIRLEY, Paul V. 
Main St., Norfolk, Mass. 
p. 372 

SILVA, Edward P. 

89 Hildreth St., Marlboro, Mass. 

p. 372 

SMARRELLA, Vincent F. 

59 Barnes .Ave., E. Boston, Mass. 

p. 372 

STATUTO, Stephen A. 
13 Jarvis St., Revere, Mass. 
p. 288, 373 

STONEHOUSE, Robert P. 

34 Hill Top St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 373 

STURGIS, Richard P. 

265 Adams St., Quincy, Mass. 

p. 373 

SULLIVAN, Francis T. 

12 Ceha Rd., W. Ro.xbury, Mass. 

SULLIVAN, James M. 

11 Avon St., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 413 



SULLIVAN, Leo J. Jr. 

589 East 8th St., S. Boston, Mass. 

p. 3 73 

SULLIVAN, Robert E. 

Ill Standish Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 373 

SULLIVAN, Thomas M. 

3 3 Bradford Rd., Milton, Mass. 

SULLIVAN, William C. 

307 Forest Ave., Brockton, Mass. 

p. 373 

SULLIVAN, William T. 

126 Curve St., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 373 

SWEENEY, Thomas E. 

27 St. James St., Lowell, Mass. 

p. 373 

SZARKOWSKI, Lester M. 

89 Congress Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 373 

TACELLI, Kenneth V. 

107 Princeton St., E. Boston, Mass. 

p. 119, 355, 374 

TESTA, Gary L. 

29 Essex Ave., Montclair, N. J. 
p. 193, 374 

TOCCI, Ronald C. 

51 Bonwood Road, Needham, Mass. 

p. 108 

TOMASI, James L. 

649 Main Street, Bennington, Vt. 

p. 374 

TONDERYS, Jan S. 

428 No. Main St., Brockton, Mass. 

p. 374 

TONTODONATO, Joseph H. 
6 Swift Ter., E. Boston, Mass. 
p. 374 

TRASK, Richard P. 

189 Corey St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 374 

TURNER, Kenneth A. 

34 South St., W. Bridgewater, Mass. 

p. 374 

VALENTI, Michael F. 

76 Westover Street, W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 374 

VERCOLLONE, Stephen E. 
Weston Rd., Lincoln, Mass. 
p. 375 

VISCIONE, Jerry A. 

9 Beachview Rd., E. Boston, Mass. 

p. 119, 288, 375 



VORIAS, Anthony D. 

128 Marshall St., N. Revere, Mass. 

p. 375 

VOTO, Frederic A. 

85 Olmsted St., E. Hartford, Conn. 

p. 375 

WALDRON, Mark A. 

591 Morton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 375 

WALSH, David I. Jr. 

163 Rice Ave., Rockland, Mass. 

p. 375 

WALSH, John F. 

41 Butler Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

p. 247, 375 

WALSH, William L. 

1109 S. 19th St., Arlington, Va. 

WANSIEWICZ, James C. 
46 Judge Rd., Lynn, Mass. 
p. 375 

WEIS, John F. 

646 Lafavette Ave., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

p. 246, 375 

WELCH, Laurence K. 

228 Depot Street, S. Easton, Mass. 

p. 375 

WEST, William 

60 Allerton Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 375 

WHALEN, James F. 

45 Plymouth St., Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 190, 193, 224, 375 

WHELAN, Thomas B. 

2 Ballard Ter., Lexington, Mass. 

p. 376 

WHITE, Richard C. 

521 Pleasant St., Milton, Mass. 

p. 376 

WILCOX, Frederick J. 

283 Litchfield St., Torrington, Conn. 

p. 231, 376 

WILLS, James A. 

118 Church St., Mansfield, Mass. 

p. 376 

WILSON, David M. 

227 Munsey Place, Manhasset, N. Y. 

p. 109, 253, 376 

WILUSZ, Joseph S. 

22 Country Club Ave., Adams, Mass. 

p. 376 

WRIGHT, George J. 

16 Cherry St., Milford, Mass. 

p. 376 



YELLE, Paul J. 

82 School St., Taunton, Mass. 

p. 376 

ZIBEL, Michael D. 

21 Fessenden St., Mattapan, Mass. 

p. 376 



SCHOOL OF 
NURSING 



AUCELLA, Dianne M. 

627 South St., Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 379 

BENSON, Patricia A. 

9 Spring St., Haverstraw, N. Y. 

p. 379 

BIANCHI, Margaret E. 

11 Swift Rd., Framingham, Mass. 

p. 4, 101, 128, 379 

BISSETT, Sally A. 

33 Moncrief Rd., Rockland, Mass. 

p. 379 

BOUCHER, Elaine M. 

149 Eutaw Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

p. 379 

BOURQUE, Claire M. 

120 Jason St., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 379 

BRESLIN, Virginia M. 

141 Berkeley PL, Glen Rock, N. J. 

p. 379 

BROWNE, Barbara A. 

5510 Jordan Rd., Washington, D. C. 

p. 112, 379 

BROWNE. Carol A. 

26 Vogel St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 379 

BROX, Nancy J. 

149 Beech St., Lowell, Mass. 

p. 249, 379 

BUCHWALD, Karen M. 

2 Peabodv Place, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 379 

CALVI, Annette M. 

69 Kilby St., Hingham, Mass. 

p. 380 



CAMPBELL, Margaret M. 

11 Colonial Drive, Arlington, Mass. 
p. 380 

CHOQUETTE, Martha L. 

12 Summer St., Adams, Mass. 
p. 377, 377A, 378, 380 

COLEMAN, Ann M. 

54 Aberdeen Ave., Warwick, R. L 
p. 380 

CONTE, Marie E. 

260 River St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 380 

COTTER, Joan W. 

173 Vine Rock St., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 380 

CULLEN, Blainid F. 

55 Homestead Ave., Wevmouth, Mass. 
p. 380 

CURLEY, Nadine E. 

495 Algonquin Rd., Fairfield, Conn. 

p. 87, 89, 380 

DOYLE, Claire T. 

62 Eliot St., Watertown, Mass. 

p. 381 

DOYLE, Donna M. 

25 Stowecroft Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 381 

DUGGAN, Kathleen M. 
45 Oak Rd., Milton, Mass. 
p. 381 

EDWARDS, Kathleen N. 

184 Wvndham Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

p. 97, 381 

EVANS, Mary E. 

3 Richmond Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 

p. 381 

EVANS, Susan R. 

205 5 Shadvwood Lane, Shreveport, La. 

p. 382 

FAHEY, Margaret E. 

52 Hillsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 382 

FEELEY, Sr. M. Helen, CSJ 

615 Cambridge St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 381 

FINN, M. Virginia 

10 Lantern Lane, Milton, Mass. 

p. 382 

FLYNTZ, Jeanne M. 

83 Lycett St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

p. 82, 117, 382 

FORMICHELLI, Marie C. 

148 Webster St., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 382 



FRENZ, Catherine N. 

318 Maple Ave., Oradell, N. J. 

p. 382 

CALVIN, Geraldine A. 

2 Rindge Terrace, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 382 

CALVIN, Geraldine M. 

18 Creighton St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 382 

GARDINER, Janet E. 

190 Edgehill Rd., Milton, Mass. 

p. 383 

GARLAND, Edna J. 

2 Morrison Court, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 383 

GATELY, Frances A. 

109 Washington St., Walpole, Mass. 

p. 383 

GHERLONE, Ada L. 

440 So. Main St., New Britain, Conn, 
p. 383 

GRAINGER, Jane B. 

Box 423, R. R. #1, Westerlv, R. I. 

p. 383 

GUTCH, Mariann 

12 Holland Ave., Dcmarest, N. J. 

p. 101, 117, 128, 290, 381, 383 

HOWE, Beatrice 

111 Shore Ave., Quincv, Mass. 

p. 383 

HUNT, Janet R. 

176 Monroe St., Dedham, Mass. 

p. 383 

JEWELL, Dorothy M. 

32 Washington St., Mvstic, Conn. 

p. 383 

KEEGAN, Kathleen A. 

8 Eastman St., Concord, N. H. 

p. 117, 377, 377A, 378, 383 

KELLY, Ann M. 

24 Argyle Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 384 

KELLY, Evelyn A. 

103 Midland Ave., Glen Ridge, N. J. 

p. 384 

KENNEDY, Gail-Ann 

Pepperrell Rd., Kitterv Point, Maine 

p. 384 

KNIGHT, Josephine A. 

14 Harrington Rd., No. Kingstown, R. I. 

p. 384 

KOSOWICZ, Stella A. 

92 Plain Rd., Nabnassett. Mass. 

p. 384 



LEE, Marcia M. 

94 Montview St., W. Roxburv, Mass. 

p. 13, 246, 384 

LETKIEWICZ, Barbara A. 

148 Sidncv Ave., W. Hartford, Conn. 

p. 384, 385 

LIUM, Carole A. 

North Park Drive, Harrison, New York 

p. 384 

LOBAN, Patricia A. 

128 Newton St., Stratford, Conn. 

p. 385 

LYNCH, Sheila A. 

31 Baker Hill Rd., Great Neck, N. Y. 
p. 385 

MAHER, Catherine D. 
Webster St., Marshfield, Mass. 

MALFA, Virginia M. 

8 Althea Rd., Randolph, Mass. 

p. 385 

MCCARROLL, Beth D. 

1815 Centre St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 385 

MCCOOL, Mary E. 

59 Paul Gore St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 385 

MCGREGOR, Joan M. 

57 Gordon St., Allston, Mass. 

p. 385 

MICHALSKI, Elizabeth L. 

160 Stratford Rd., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

p. 13, 385 

MOYNEHAN, Susan J. 

67 Grant Ave., Glens Falls, N. Y. 

p. 386 

MURPHY, Ellen J. 

170 Manning St., Hudson, Mass. 

p. 386 

NELSON, Elaine M. 

184 Parker Hill Ave., Boston, Mass. 

p. 386 

NISIUS, Judith A. 

20780 Vallev Forge Dr., Fairview Park, O. 

p. 386 

O'CONNOR, Ann G. 

51 Winter St., Medford, Mass. 
p. 386 

O'NEILL, Elizabeth D. 

32 Rose Hill Way, Waltham, Mass. 
p. 386 

PIETRASZEK, Ann M. 

342 Lowell St., Methuen, Mass. 

p. 386 



PLASSE, JoAnn E. 

224 Pondview Dr., Springfield, Mass. 

p. 126, 386 

POLEK, Claire A. 

92 Elm St., Thompsonville, Conn. 

p. 387 

PULTINAS, Brenda A. 

701 Washington Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 

p. 387 

QUINN, Sheila M. 

69 Forbes Hill Rd., Wollaston, Mass. 
p. 387 

ROSS, Diane A. 

202 Oliver St., Fall River, Mass. 

p. 382, 387 

SALTER, Rachel L. 

64 Westwood Rd., Augusta, Maine 

p. 380, 387 

SHEA, Elizabeth R. 

9 Meadowbrook Rd., Bedford, Mass. 

p. 387 

SIWINSKI, Jovce V. 

53 Acrebrook Rd., Springfield, Mass. 

p. 126, 387 

SOUSA, Nancy E. 

19 E. Normandv Dr., W. Hartford, Conn. 

p. 388 

STABILE, Sandra 

133 Ocean St., Brant Rock, Mass. 

p. 117, 387, 388 

SULLIVAN, Patricia M. 

3-c River Park Apts., White Plains, N. Y. 

p. 388 

SYLVESTER, Gail A. 

70 South St., Burlington, Vt. 
p. 248, 249, 388 

THIBEAULT, Judith A. 

8 Cushing St., Berkeley, R. I. 

p. 388 

THOMAS, Rosemary M. 

41 Hamlet St., Arlington, Mass. 

p. 117, 377, 377A, 378, 388 

TREMLETT, Carole A. 

4 Mt. Vernon St., Brighton, Mass. 

p. 377, 377A, 378, 388, 393 

WAREING, Betty A. 

116 Warren St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 385, 388 

WIKER, Janet M. 

156 Russell St., Waltham, Mass. 

p. 384, 388 

WILLETT, Sr. William Mary 
444 Centre St., Milton, Mass. 
p. 385 



ZALEWSKI, Charlotte E. 
30 Ridge Rd., Milton, Mass. 
p. 388 



GRADUATE 
NURSING 



ABRAHAMS, Helen 

32 Druid Hill Rd., Newton Hglds., Mass. 

p. 391 

AUCLAIR, Marie F. 

P. O. Box 93, Rogers, Conn. 

p. 391 

BAK, Sister M. Cornelia 
Immaculate Cone. Convent 
Osgood Ave., New Britain, Conn. 

BARBRICK, Margaret A. 

44 Conant St., Danvers, Mass. 

p. 391 

BONNETTE, Elaine J. 

1 1 Racicot Avenue, Webster, Mass. 

p. 391 

BRAMBILLA, Mary A. 

15 Yorktown St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 391 

BRENNAN, Susan J. 
Spring Road, Prospect, Conn. 

BURKE, Sister M. Immaculate 
Pro\'idence Mother House 
Holyoke, Mass. 

CARNEY, Joan A. 

103 Mooreland St., Springfield, Mass. 

CARRESSE, Kathleen Mooney 

R. D. #2, Ballston Lake, New York 

CHASTNEY, Genevieve A. 
5 5 Ehzabcth St., Athol, Mass. 
p. 391 

CLARK, Carol A. 

87 Florian St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

COX, Carol 

25 Glenwood Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 389, 390 

CRONIN, Patricia A. 

1842 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

CUMMINGS, Mary A. 

119 Broad St., Woonsocket, R. I. 



DALBEC, Sandra A. 

1 58 Tinkham St., New Bedford, Mass. 

DANNAHY, Maureen D. 

11 Emerald Ave., Lawrence, Mass. 

DAVIDSON, Diana L. 

96 Colton Place, Longmeadow, Mass. 

p. 391 

DESROSIERS, Sister Muriel 
45 Colder St., Lewiston, Maine 
p. 391 

DORGAN, Mary 

62 Beacon St., Lawrence, Mass. 

DUFFICY, Janet K. 

315 Summer St., New Bedford, Mass. 
p. 391 

DWYER, Patricia M. 

103 High St., E. Weymouth, Mass. 

EMOND, Lucille G. 

26 Van Buren St., Taunton, Mass. 

p. 391 

FOLEY, Helen A. 

2 Shear St., Wrentham, Mass. 

CALVIN, Gcraldine M. 

140 Milton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

GILDEA, Joanne E. 

8 Theurer Park, Watertown, Mass. 

COWAN, Mary E. 

2494 Princeton Rd., Cleveland Hghts, O. 

p. 392 

GRUETER, Marguerite M. 

32 Melbourne Rd., Milton, Mass. 

HADDOCK, Janice A. 

16 Patterson Place, Augusta, Maine 

HANLON, Joan E. 

11 Carol Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

HANNEY, Sr. Laurence Mary 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chnt. HI., Mass. 

HARRISON, Gail P. 

1837 Robeson St., Fall River, Mass. 

HAYKAL, Theresa 

3 Caswell Ave., Methucn, Mass. 

HEIM, Mary A. 

9 No. Blvd., Albany, New York 
p. 392 

HENNESSEY, Luella R. 

271 Main St., Walpole, Mass. 

HIBEL, Doris E. 

15 Woodmere Rd., Framingham, Mass. 



HOGAN, Patricia A. 

115 Clyde Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 

p. .^92' 

HORGAN, Judith F. 

105 Addington Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 

HOUDE, Gloria A. 

85 Childs St., Lynn, Mass. 

p. 392 

jEDRYCHOWSKA, Ewa M. 
56 Cross St., Foxboro, Mass. 

JOY, Sister Mary Mercy, S.P. 
Providence Mother House, Holyoke, Mass. 

KALOYANIDES, Elaine E. 

83 Wallace St., Somerville, Mass. 

KARPINSKI, Rose M. 

37 North Baldwin St., Johnson City, N. Y. 

p. 392 

KEEFE, Anna J. 

3 5 Denver St., Saugus, Mass. 

KENNEDY, Kathan 

51 Rockland Ave., Woonsocket, R. I. 

p. 392 

KOPCHIK, Eileen 

44 Meadow St., Ansonia, Conn. 

LAROCHELLE, Claudette D. 
129 Farwell St., Lewiston, Maine 
p. 392 

LAWLER, Nancy M. 

24 Aklrich Ave., Auburn, N. Y. 

p. 393 

LEABO, Catherine M. 

3 Clarcmont Ave., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

LOMBARD!, Carol F. 

1 19 Hillside Rd., Franklin, Mass. 

p. 82, 88, 393 

MAHANY, Kathryn J. 

34 South Main St., Albion, N. Y. 

MARANDA, Claire D. 

19 Chester St., No. Smithfield, R. L 

p. 393 

MARCOLINL Linda A. 

78 Springfield St., Quincy, Mass. 

MARRONE, Elizabeth L. 
36 Hudson St., Trenton, N. J. 

MCCARTHY, Carolyn A. 

42 Brook St., W. Barrington, R. L 

p. 393 

MCGUIRK, M. Marcia 

12 Oakdale St., Providence, R. L 

p. 393 

MCLELLAN, Georgia B. 

475 Trapelo Rd., Waltham, Mass. 



MONACO, Justine A. 

3 5 Venus Street, South Weymouth, Mass. 

p. 393 

MORIARTY, Maureen A. 

62 Belden St., New Britain, Conn. 

p. 394 

MORIN, Leona C. 

43 Hodges Ave., Taunton, Mass. 

p. 394 

MORRIS, Mary Jane 

1300 Sussex Road, Teaneck, New Jersey 

p. 394 

MUKHERJEE, Nina A. 

1242 Comm. Ave., Boston, Mass. 

p. 395 

MURRAY, Carolvn E. 

250 Atwatcr St., New Haven, Conn. 

NOLAN, Rosemary 

138 Poplar Drive, Cranston, R. L 

p. 395 

NORRIS, Patricia M. 

62 William St., INTedford, Mass. 

p. 39 5 

NORTH, Helen M. 

17 Panncll Circle, Fairport, N. Y. 

p. 395 

NORTON, Barbara A. 

230 Pine St., Burlington, Vermont 

p, 39 5 

PENNEY, Sister M. Brigid, O.P. 

109 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 

QUEALY, Ann G. 

2 7 Clinton St., Everett, Mass. 
p. 389, 390, 395 

REARDON, Joan F. 

1846 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

REDMOND, Gertrude T. 

139 Franklin St., Lawrence, Mass. 

p. 395 

ROPER, Jean M. 

42 Codman Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

SCHNEIDERS, Maryjane 

21 Pondview Road, Canton, Mass. 

SLACK, Patricia A. 

52 Plymouth Ave., Milton, Mass. 

SPELLMAN, Maureen 

92 Grove St., Quincy, Mass. 

THIBODEAU, Dorothy J. 

67 Elm St., New Rochelle, New York 

p. 395 

THIMM, Emma L. 

442 Walnut St., Newtonville, Mass. 



TOWNSEND, Sister Francis Richard 
8 30 Merrimack St., Lowell, Mass. 

VANESCHAK, Beverly E. 

631 Brace St., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

p. 395 

VASOLI, MaryAnn 

1 Belvedere St., Barre, Vermont 

p. 395 

WALSH, Joanne M. 

64 Proxidence St., Worcester, Mass. 

p. 395 



SCHOOL OF 
EDUCATION 



AHERNE, Maureen 

29 Grayson Lane, Newton, Mass. 

ANDERSON, Elaine D. 

21 Ewell Avenue, Lexington, Mass. 

p. 399 

ANTHONY, George S. 

144 Rockland Street, Brockton, Mass. 

p. 399 

ANTONELLIS, Concetta M. 

42 Hawthorne Street, Newton, Mass. 

p. 399, 400 

BALONEK, Sandra K. 

48 Mareeta Road, Rochester, New York 

p. 399 

BARRY, Anne M. 

54 Pond Street, Westwood, Mass. 

p. 399 

BARRY, John M. 

2 Black Horse Terrace, Winchester, Mass. 

p. 257, 399 

BARYS, Mary E. 

90 Chestnut Street, Chelsea, Mass. 

p. 399 

BATTLE, Sheila E. 

639 Bridge Street, Lowell, Mass. 

p. 399 

BRANNELLY, Maureen R. 

96 Railroad Avenue, Norwood, Mass. 

p. 399 

BRESCIA, Marie-Elaine 

341 Salem Street, Maiden, Mass. 

p. 82, 399 



BRODLEY, Sally M. 

44 Maryland Avenue, Lowell, Mass. 

p. 399' 

CADWALLADER, Ralph L. 

54 Barnard Avenue, Watertown, Mass. 

p. 110, 399 

CAEFREY, Daniel J. 

810 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

p. 400 

C'ALDICOTT, Mary A. 

1 14 Hamilton Road, Hempstead, New York 

p. 400 

CALLAHAN, Edward A. 

26 Ash Street, Woburn, Mass. 

CAMACHO, Robert M. 

2 56 Pleasant Street, Arlington, Mass. 
p. 232, 400, 401 

CAMPANA, Patricia A. 

46 Ledgelawn Avenue, Lexington, Mass. 

p. 400 

CARLUCCL Angelo A. 

74 Munson Street, Port Chester, New York 

p. 400 

CARROLL, Janet E. 

70 Craftsland Road, Brookline, Mass. 

p. 400, 412 

CAVANAUGH, Jane F. 

360 Union Avenue, Eramingham, Mass. 

p. 400 

COLE, Robert A. 

372 Hyde Park Avenue, Roslindale, Mass. 

CONDON, Joseph W. 

137 West Adams Street, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 400 

CONLON, Maureen A. 

29 Msgr. Reynolds Way, Boston, Mass. 

p. 400 

COOKE, Mary A. 

3 1 Murray Avenue, Milton, Mass. 
p. 312, 397, 398, 400 

COUCH, Cynthia M. 

8 Standard Street, Mattapan, Mass. 

p. 112, 401 

COVINO, Anthony M. 

48 Ridgeway Road, Medford, Mass. 

p. 401 

COX, Priscilla E. 

101 Chestnut Street, Wakefield, Mass. 

p. 401 

COYLE, E. Wallace 

16 Buckingham Road, Milton, Mass. 

p. 401 



CROKE, William E. 

10 Revere Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 110, 401 

CRONIN, Diane M. 

20 Levton Road, Norwood, Mass. 
p. 126, 246, 401, 402 

CURLEY, Thomas M. 

16 Thornton Place, Newton, Mass. 

p. 116, 257 

CURRAN, Kathleen M. 

23 Claymoss Road, Brighton, Mass. 

p. 401 

D'ANGELO, Lorraine M. 

30 Flovd Street, Everett, Mass. 

p. 401' 

DEEDY, Dorothy C. 

21 Lochstead Avenue, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
p. 402 

DEGRINNEY, Roberta M. 

95 Newland Road, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 402, 405 

DIX, Pamela A. 

581 Hale Street, Prides Crossing, Mass. 

p. 402 

DOUGHERTY, John F. 

56 Garrison Street, Portland, Maine 

p. 402 

EMERY, Maureen E. 

91 North Street, Stoneham, Mass. 

p. 402 

EYDENBERG, John F. 

54 Trevalley Road, Revere, Mass. 
p. 224, 402 

FAHERTY, Sheila M. 

106 West Street, Ouincy, Mass. 

p. 102 

FELKEL, Robert W. 

22 Longacre Road, Needham, Mass. 
p. 402^ 

FEMINO, Peter G. 

151 Fairbanks Road, Dedham, Mass. 

p. 402 

FINN, Mary E. 

12 Watson Street, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 402 

FISHER, Wanda A. 

25 Colonial Avenue, Waltham, Mass. 

p. 403 

FLANAGAN, Judith M. 

10 Johns Avenue, Medfield, Mass. 

p. 403 

FONTAINE, Patricia J. 

76 Newbert Ave., South Weymouth, Mass. 

p. 246, 403 



FRAZETTI, Joanne T. 

45 Ho\^land Street, Needham, Mass. 

p. 403 

GASPAROTTO, Mirella 

1047 Pleasant Street, Canton, Mass. 

p. 403 

GERMANO, Beverly A. 

1 Access Road, Norwood, Mass. 

p. 257, 403 

GHERSON, Joan M. 

23 Waverlv Street, Everett, Mass. 

p. 403 

GIBBONS, Richard F. 

51 Arlington Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 

p. 403 

GILLIGAN, Geraldine M. 

77 Falmouth Road, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 97, 403 

GILLIS, Peter C. 

3 32 Washington Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

GORDON, Ellen F. 

121 Bacon Street, Natick, Mass. 

p. 248, 403, 414 

GORDON, Thomas J. 

1 7 Church Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 404 

GOVATSOS, Gerald A. 

51 Randolph Street, Canton, Mass. 

p. 404 

GRADY, Noreen P. 

64 Stuart Street, Watertown, Mass. 

p. 404 

GRAY, Roselyn L. 

12 Newport Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 404 

GUMULA, V. Ursula 

17 Pine Street, Ware, Mass. 

p. 404 

HARDING, Barbara A. 

5 5 Robin Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 404 

HARRIS, Mary 

979 Salem Street, Lynnfield, Mass. 

p. 404 

HAYES, Rena M. 

15 Osborne Road, Medford, Mass. 

p. 257, 404 

HEFFERNAN, Mary E. 

82 Charles River Road, Watertown, Mass. 

p. 405 

HENTZ, Dorothy H. 

61 Kenmore Place, Glen Rock, N. J. 

p. 405 



HOLLAND, M. Karen 

164 Elgin Street, Newton Centre, Mass. 
p. 405^ 

HOLLAND, Timothy F. 

26 Wave Way Avenue, Winthrop, Mass. 

HOUGHTON, Kathleen A. 

42 Draper Avenue, Mansfield, Mass. 

p. 257, 405 

HUGHES, Helen J. 

2 5 Ashland Street, Melrose, Mass. 

p. 405 

HUSE, James G. 

51 Century Street, Medford, Mass. 
p. 95, 404, 405 

JACKSON, William J. 

14 Dale Street, Needham, Mass. 

p. 405 

JOHNSON, Peter B. 

152 Cornish Street, Weymouth, Mass. 

KEEFE, James E. 

2 Breed Terrace, Lynn, Mass. 
p. 110, 405 

KELLEY, Donald A. 

80 Pleasant Street, North Attleboro, Mass. 

p. 110, 127, 405 

KELLEY, Judith E. 

3 Oak Street, Belmont, Mass. 
p. 406 

KINGSBURY, Mary M. 

5 59 Main Street, Stoneham, Mass. 

p. 406 

KOLEDO, Alicia H. 

32 Coolidge Road, Springfield, Vermont 

p. 8, 116, 403, 406 

LAFLAMME, Lucille M. 

23 Providence Street, Amesbury, Mass. 

p. 406 

LAWLER, Kathleen A. 

87 Richardson Road, Lynn, Mass. 

p. 406 

LEARY, Jeanette E. 

30 Elm Street, Wethersfield, Conn, 
p. 406 

LECLAIR, Carol M. 

52 Cedarwood Avenue, Waltham, Mass. 
p. 249, 406, 408 

LEE, Richard A. 

727 McKinlev Parkway, Buffalo, New York 

p. 193. 406 

LEHTO, Sandra M. 

31 Mt. Carmel Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 
p. 406 



LINN, Edward F. 

73 Columbus Avenue, Stoughton, Mass. 

LOMBARDI, Helen P. 

10 Newacre Road, Hyde Park, Mass. 
p. 406 

LONG, Helen M. 

1 1 Ober Street, Salem, Mass. 
p. 257, 406 

LONGOBARDI, Marilyn A. 

3 8 Arlington Street, Franklin, Mass. 
p. 407 

LYONS, Paul J. 

5 Shenandoah Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 407 

MACDOUGALL, Ritajane 

70 Willard Street, Dedham, Mass. 

p. 407 

MACMILLAN, Paulette M. 
Storey Street, Forge Village, Mass. 
p. 407 

MACNEIL, Rita K. 

24 Powder House Ter., Somerville, Mass. 

p. 112, 407 

MADORE, Margaret A. 

Hillside Court, Southbridge, Mass. 

p. 408 

MAHONEY, Timothy F. 

16 Norris Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
p. 110, 257, 408 

MALLON, Robert M. 

108 Jersey St., Apt. 8, Boston, Mass. 

p. 408, 409 

MALONSON, James S. 

43 Summerhill Street, Stoneham, Mass. 

MANN, Barbara E. 

157 Perham Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

p. 408 

MANNIX, Linda E. 

3 3 Summit Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 
p. 408 

MARTIN, Elizabeth M. 

270 Route 59, West Nvack, New York 

p. 408 

MCCARTHY, Jacquelyn A. 

4 Pemberton Terrace, Cambridge, Mass. 
p. 407 

MCCARTHY, Kathleen M. 

17 Oakland Avenue, Arlington, Mass. 
p. 407 

MCCARTHY, Margaret J. 

817 Dorchester Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 103 



MCCARTHY, Patricia A. 

11 Hardwick Street, Brighton, Mass. 
p. 407 

MCLAUGHLIN, Marv Jane C. 

91 Strickland Street, Manchester, Conn. 

p. 407 

MCNAMARA, Mary C. 

24 Fountain Road, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 407 

MCNULTY, K. Patricia 

50 Laurel Street, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 397, 397A. 398, 406, 408 

MCVARISH, Kathleen V. 

110 Warren Street, Brighton, Mass. 

p. 408 

MONTAGUE, Jean M. 

44 Brookside Avenue, Belmont, Mass. 

p. 257, 408 

MOONEY, John D. 

59 Fuller Terrace, West Newton, Mass. 

p. 408 

MULLEN, Paul E. 

22 Howe Road, Needham, Mass. 

p. 409 

MURPHY, Judith A. 

1974 Washington Street, Newton, Mass. 

p. 409 

MURPHY. Margaret M. 

12 Vinewood Road, Milton, Mass. 
p. 409 

MURPHY, Marilyn A. 

251 Tremont Street, Newton, Mass. 

p. 409 

MURPHY, Maureen V. 

14 Llewellyn Road, West Newton, Mass. 

p. 409 

MURRAY, Stephen G. 

1 5 Walnut Street, Allendale, New Jersey 

p. 193, 224, 409 

NANNINI, Peter E. 

48 Patton Road, Wellesley, Mass. 

p. 110, 409 

NARCISO, Sheila A. 

88 Gordon Avenue, Hvde Park, Mass. 

p. 253, 409 

NATALIE, Marijane V. 

54 Cambridge Street, Revere, Mass. 

p. 410 

NEY, Carol A. 

7 Edmore Lane, West Islip, New York 

p. 410 



NICOLORO, Aminda L. 

15 Harding Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 410 

NIGRO, Joseph P. 

96 East Main Street, Milford, Mass. 

p. 410 

O'DONNELL, Mary T. 

1 1 Westerly Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 410 

O'KEEFE. James G. 

10 Vista Street, Roslindale, Mass. 
p. 410 

O'MALLEY, Joanne M. 

11 Woodland Road, Maiden, Mass. 
p. 410 

O'NEILL, Laurence J. 

3 Garden Road, Stoneham, Mass. 

p. 410 

ORLANDELLO, John R. 

29 Eastern Avenue, Revere, Mass. 

p. 410 

PAGLIARO, Joseph A. 

13 Homer Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 110, 410 

PASSACANTILLI, Victor E. 
422 Hanover Street, Boston, Mass. 
p. 411 

PAULHUS, Richard L, 

1114 Providence Road. Whitinsville, Mass. 

p. 411 

PISINSKT, Robert F. 

3 Pitt Street, Worcester, Mass. 

p. 193 

POELAERT. Donna L. 

3 Lawrence Road, Milton, Mass. 

p. 411 

PRINCE, Judith F. 

1 1 Foxmeadow Lane, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 411 

PROIETTI, A. Peter 

32 Carter Street, Leominster, Mass. 

p. 411 

QUIGLEY, David R. 

1442 Hamilton Avenue, Waterburv, Conn. 

p. 411 

RAWSON, Sharon M. 

422 Branch Drive, Sihcr Spring, Marvland 

p. 411 

REILLY, Maureen A. 

470 Prospect Street, Stoughton, Mass. 

p. 411 

RICE, Diane L. 

Brooksidc Drive, Greenwich, Conn. 

p. 410, 411 



RICHARDSON, Anne F. 

5 3 Lake Street, Middleton, Mass. 

p. 411 

RICHMOND, Arland J. 

107 Cross Street, Maiden, Mass. 

p. 412 

RIDGE, Barbara A. 

68 Fremont Avenue, Chelsea, Mass. 
p. 412 

RIHA, Kathleen F. 

3 59 Cornell Street, Roslindale, Mass. 
p. 412 

RISGIN, John E. 

Boston Road, Groton, Mass. 

p. 412 

RODDY, Clare M. 

1024 South Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

p. 412 

ROSSI, Sheila A. 

2 Ingalls Terrace, Lynnfield, Mass. 

p. 249, 411, 412 

RYAN, Rosemary E. 

17 Prince Street, Needham, Mass. 

p. 412 

RYDER, Janet M. 

5 7 ClifF Street, Plvmouth, Mass. 

p. 412 

SALVI, Irene J. 

31 Cutter Avenue, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 412 

SANMIGUEL, Linda 

472 Webber Road, Spartanburg, S. C. 

p. 412 

SCIMONE, Therese M. 

33 Clyde Street, Belmont, Mass. 

p. 413 

SERGI, Richard J. 

8 54 Belmont Street, Brockton, Mass. 

SHAW, Pauhne A. 

Main Street, Dunstable, Mass. 

p. 413 

SHEA, Virginia C. 

221 Waverlv Street, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 299, 413 

SIMMONS, Alfred M. 

5A Roberts Road, Cambridge, Mass. 

p. 413 

SKARROW, Margaret T. 

5 Chase Street, Pawcatuck, Conn. 

p. 413 

SMITH, Donna M. 

7 Clearview Dr., Framingham Cntre, Mass. 

p. 413 



SMITH, Mary E. 

12 Carver Road East,.Watertown, Mass. 

p. 312, 413 

SPORE, Mary K. 

41 Oxbow Road, Weston, Mass. 

p. 103, 413 

STAGEY, A. Claire 

14 Marlton Road, Waltham, Mass. 
p. 413 

STEVENS, Sally T. 

90 Cottage Street, Franklin, Mass. 

p. 413 

SULLIVAN, Barbara A. 

216 River St., Mattapan, Mass. 

SULLIVAN, James D. 

12 Brooksweld Road, Canton, Mass. 

p. 231, 397, 397A, 398 

SULLIVAN, James M. 

15 Carmel Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

SULLIVAN, Paul J. 

11 Upland Road, Watertown, Mass. 

p. 224, 414 

SULLIVAN, Sheila P. 

14 Grove Street Place, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 414 

SULLIVAN, Thomas J. 

54 Laurel Street, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 414 

SWEENEY, Linda A. 

North Avenue, Mendon, Mass. 

p. 414 

TESSIER, Lucien C. 

7 Bedel Street, Manchester, N. H. 
p. 227, 414, 415 

THOMAS, Stephanie M. 

5 5 Bourne Street, lamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 414 

THORNTON, Eleanor M. 

50 Hall Avenue, Somerville, Mass. 

p. 116, 415 

TORAN, Ralnh A. 

69 Marshall Street, Needham, Mass. 

p. 197, 198, 200, 206, 207, 415 

TORREGROSSA, Alfred C. 

328 Appleton Street, Arlington, Mass. 

p. 415 

TROTTIER, Robert H. 

29 Lvman Street. Waltham, Mass. 

p. 415 

TRUDEAU, Suzanne T. 

East Main Street, Stockbridgc, Mass. 

p. 415 



TRUDEL, Patricia A. 

244 Strawberry Hill Ave, Stamford, Conn. 

TUBEROSA, Michele J. 

50 Barnes Avenue, East Boston, Mass. 

p. 257, 312, 415 

VAUGHAN, Michael P. 

14 Hathaway Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

p. 415 

WALSH, David J. 

16 Eisenhower Avenue, Beverly, Mass. 

WALSH, Elizabeth M. 

1966 Valentine Avenue, Bronx, New York 

p. 415 

WOJDYLAK, Sally A. 

70 Harvard Street, Gardner, Mass. 

p. 397, 398, 416 



WOLFF, Harold T. 

247 Danbury Circle So., Rochester, N. Y. 

p. 100, 416 

YOUNG, Prudence M. 

3 3 Aspinwall Road, Dorchester, Mass. 

p. 416 

YUROF, Anne M. 

10 Osceola Street, Mattapan, Mass. 

p. 416 

ZOLLO, Madelyne L 

56 North Main Street, Beacon Falls, Conn. 

p. 116, 246, 249, 416 




GENERAL INDEX 



Accounting Department 32 

Alpha and Omega 116 

Alpha Kappa Psi 108 

Alpha Sigma Nu 115 

Apartment Living 268-271 

Artist-in-Residence 276-277 

Arts and Sciences Administration 22-23 

Arts and Sciences Student Senate 84 



Band 94-95 

BasebaU 221-225 

BasketbaU 208-220 
Bellarmaine Law and Government 105 

Betta Gamma Sigma 119 

Biology Department 33-34 

Business Law Department 35 



Inter-Departmental Programs 55 



Campus Council 


82-83 


Chemistry Department 


36-38 


Circle K 


110 


Citizens Seminar 


274-275 


Classics Department 


39 


CBA Administration 


24-25 


CBA Student Senate 


85 


Council of Resident Men 


89 


Delta Sigma Pi 


109 


Dramatic Society 


102-103 


E.C.A.C. Hockey 


237-239 


Economics Department 


40-41 


Education Administration 


26-27 


Education Department 


43-46 


Education Student Senate 


86 


Education Skits 


254-257 


Enghsh Department 


47-49 


Evening College Administration 


30 


Evening College Student Senate 


88 


Finance Department 


50 


Fine Arts Department 


51 


Football 


178-193 


Fulton Debating Society 


104 


Geology Department 


52 


Gold Key Society 


100-101 


Golf 


231 


Graduate Nursing Student Senate 88 


Graduates, A&S 


291 


CBA 


341 


Education 


397 


Evening College 


335 


Grad Nursing 


389 


Basic Nursing 


377 


The Great Debate 


272-273 


The Heights 


121-123 


History Department 


53-54 


Hockey 


194-207 


Ian and Silvia 


283 


Ice Chips 


282 



Junior Prom 
Junior Show 
Junior Year Abroad 



Kappa Pi 

Knights of Columbus 



Lay Apostolate 



Marketing Department 
Mathematics Department 
Military Ball 

Military Science Department 
Modern Languages Department 



N.C.A.A. Hockey 
N.I.T. Basketball 
Nursing Administration 
Nursing Department 



Order of the Cross and Crown 



244-247 
248-249 
280-281 



110 
111 



278-279 



56 

57-58 
264-267 
59 
60-61 



240-243 
234-235 
28-29 
62-65 



118 



Philosophy Department 


66-69 


Physics Department 


70-71 


Political Clubs 


106-107 


Political Science Department 


72 


Production Department 


73 


Psychology Department 


74 


R.O.T.C. 


98-99 


St. John Berchmans' Society 


93 


Scholars of the College 


114 


Sienna Society 


117 


Skiing 


231 


Sociology Department 


75 


Sodahty 


90-93 


Speech Department 


76 


The Stylus 


120 


The Sub Turri 


124-127 


Theology Department 


77-79 


Track 


226-229 



Undergraduate Nursing Student 

Senate 87 

University Administration 16-21 

University Chorale 96-97 



Women's Council 86 

Women's Dormitory Council 89 

Women's Recreation Association 112 

Wrestling 230 

Writer-in-Residence 259 

WVBC 113 



NINETEEN HUNDRED SIXTY FIVE 
SUB TURRI STAFF 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
James G. Hartnett 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Eugene J. Donahue 



LITERARY EDITOR 
Dennis P. Williams 



LAYOUT EDITOR 
Douglas R. LaBrecque 



PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 
John J. Lambert, Jr. 



ACADEMIC EDITORS 

Robert J. O'Hare, Jr. 

Thomas J. Cote 



ACTIVITIES EDITORS 
Donald A. Kelley 
Jeffrey P. Somers 



UNDERCLASS EDITORS 

Michael R. LaFontaine 

Patricia A. Podd 



SPORTS EDITORS 

Irving J. Goss 

Robert W. Gilvey 



FEATURES EDITORS 

James K. Manning 

Neal E. Hunt 



GRADUATE EDITORS 

William S. Paine 
V. Ursula Gumula 



ADVERTISING MANAGER 
Eugene J. Donahue 



SALES MANAGER 
Bruce D. Gormley 



PATRONS MANAGER 
George Baldwin 



INDEX EDITOR 
James J. Mahoney, Jr. 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 

James M. Peters, Jr. 

Douglas R. LaBrecque 

Bruce D. Gormley 

I Thomas J. Cote 

I James G. Hartnett 



SENIOR STAFF 
Joyce V. Siwinski 
Diane M. Cronin 
Sandra L. LeClair 



SECRETARIES 

Patricia L. Hanna 
Martha L. Choquette 

JoAnn E. Plasse 
Kathleen M. Gaumont 

Kathleen Wright 



MODERATOR 
Rev. John P. McNamara, S.J. 



the last word . . . 



This year, as in the last fift\'-two years of the 
Sub Turn's existence, the goals and ideals of the 
editor were met, but not without the traditional 
degree of headaches, anguish, and near despair. 
What ostensibly appeared a simple job, proved, 
with the addition of unexpected comphcations, to 
be far from that ideal. Three previous years on the 
staff and the experience gained therein made the 
task somewhat easier, but with it, brought bigger 
ideals, goals, and ambitions for the book, and the 
realization of them became a far from easy task. 
But that same realization which was envisioned last 
year has been fulfilled with the delivery of this 
volume. 

This year's Suh Turri contains a blend of the 
most unique concepts in yearbook production, de- 
signs which have never before been used in any 
publication of this kind. That fact in itself makes 
this, the fifty-third edition, the most unique in the 
history of Boston College. Not because this book 
is the most lengthy of any previous edition, but 
because of the care and quality which has been 
taken in its production, the graduating class of 
1965 has been immortalized in the finest yearbook 
ever to be produced by the Sub Turri staff. 

As if quality alone were not the single criterion 
to be evaluated in a yearbook production, this 
edition of the Sub Turri became the first, since 
World War II, to be priced lower than fifteen 
dollars. This financial challenge was not enough 
for the editors to meet; one step further was made. 
For the first time in the history of this University, 
a separate edition of the Sub Turri was programed 
for the students of the freshman, sophomore, and 
junior classes, hopefully to stir or replenish a lack- 
ing spirit for the University among the members 
of those classes. The Sub Turri is no longer a year- 
book solely for the members of the graduating class. 
It is a publication for the total University. I am 
proud to have been responsible in part for this 
newest step forward in creating and maintaining 
a total University here at the Heights. 

All the credit for the success of a given yearbook 
in a given year can not be directed to the members 
of its staff. Many people who contributed to the 
production of this publication must be given their 
due. Here, then, is an attempt to do just that. 

The Sub Turri this year was published by New 
England Yearbooks, of Waltham, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Douglas Mitchell, their representative, more 
than adequately assisted us in producing these 
pages. The photographs in the Graduate section of 
the book were taken by the Warren Kay Vantine 
Studio of Boston; all the personnel of the 
studio deserve our thanks. Our moderator, 
Fr. McNamara, exercised his office in a manner 
which has always been praised by editors of the 
Sub Turri. He was always at the right place at the 
right time, forceful when necessary — and it was 
at times — but understanding and totally coopera- 



tive, as it was more of the time. The Registrar of 
the University, Fr. Fitzgerald, and the individual 
College Registrars once again proved to be invalu- 
able in keeping us supplied with vital information 
about the students. Fr. Calvin, Director of McElroy 
Commons, in which our subterranean offices are 
located, again this year met the challenge of our 
late night deadlines and constant requests for 
special permissions. John Larner, Public Relations 
Director for the University, with instant recall on 
names, dates, and events, supplied us with the 
factual data needed in completing this book. Sports 
proved to be a gigantic and thrilling spectacle at 
the Heights this year. And so in covering the vari- 
ous events in which our teams competed it was 
necessary to go through the office of Eddie Miller, 
Director of Sports Publicity; never was the answer 
no. I hope his trust in us has been justified by the 
Sports section we have produced in this volume. 
We think it is a more than outstanding representa- 
tion of our athletic prowess for the past year. While 
on the subject of sports, I want, at this time, to pay 
a special debt of thanks to Mr. Fred Kaplan, who 
supplied the Sub Turri with the sole color photo- 
graph of Bill Cronin's fantastic catch at the Syra- 
cuse game last fall. This was a great moment in 
Boston College sports history; we are grateful to 
Mr. Kaplan for being able to have that moment re- 
corded in this year's book. A yearbook, especially 
this one this year, could not exist if it were not for 
the financial support given us by the persons listed 
as Patrons in the closing pages of this volume. It 
is to them that thanks must be given; were it not 
for their generosity and enthusiasm, this book could 
never have been sold for such a low price. Last, 
but not least, as the old cliche goes, thanks from 
me to the members of my staff who met their indi- 
vidual responsibility, placing it before any personal 
pleasure not connected with the production of this 
book. A yearbook is not a one-man job; the staff 
too, takes the credit for what has been printed on 
the preceding pages. It is the biggest edition ever 
printed; I think it is the best. Next year the chal- 
lenge will be met by another; I hope his luck with 
the task will be as good as mine has been. 

For those of you who relish the technical infor- 
mation concerning the production of this volume, 
I offer the following data. The 1965 Sub Turri has 
been printed on 80 lb. Warren's Lustro Offset 
Enamel Dull; the tissue dividers are 13 lb. Ripco- 
master translucent. The book was printed at New 
England Yearbooks, a division of Pembrooke Com- 
pany, Inc., Main Street, Waltham, Massachusetts, 
on a Harris 25 x 38 Lum, two color press. The 
typeface used for main text was 12/14 Fairfield. 
Color section text and that on divider pages is 
14/18 Fairfield Itahc. Headings are 30 pt. Lydian 
Bold, except on the divider pages where they are 
60 pt, and in the table of contents where they are 
24 pt. Captions are 9/10 Fairfield. 



James G. Hartnett, Editor-in-Chief 




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